4 posts tagged “walking”

Could the Rolling Stones be part of Parkinson’s disease management? (Check out Pamela Quinn’s blog)

Posted April 26th, 2017 by

It’s Parkinson’s Awareness Month, and we’re continuing to find meaningful stories in the world of PD. Did you tune into our recent podcast featuring Pamela Quinn – a professional dancer who’s living with Parkinson’s? She teaches dance classes in New York City for people with PD. Now, she’s taking her dance and movement tips to a broader audience online in a cool new blog (psst – Rolling Stones fans, read on…)!

Pamela Quinn Parkinson's

Some members have noted in the PatientsLikeMe PD forum that they’ve attended and benefited from dance classes for people with PD (even ones that reference Pam’s teachings!). But what if you have PD and live where classes like this aren’t available – or if dance classes just aren’t up your alley? Check out Pam’s blog, PD Movement Lab.

Songs to step to

Pam uses visuals, like photos and videos, in a series of mini-lessons for moving and walking with PD. In one of her first posts, she shows how walking to music can make a big difference, and offers a playlist of her favorite songs to walk to at varying tempos, including:

  • “Fever,” Peggy Lee (68 beats per minute)
  • “Clarinet Concerto in A Major,” Mozart (94 bpm)
  • “Moon Rocks,” Talking Heads (124 bpm)
  • “Brown Sugar,” Rolling Stones (129 bpm)

(Hint: You can find out the tempo of your own favorite songs using this neat BPM calculator, and then create your own playlist.)

“We can put it back together”

Pam’s blog is all about empowering people with PD to keep moving, although she knows first-hand that it’s not easy (she has lived with PD for more than 20 years).

Dancing for Parkinson's

“Why are we breaking a walk down into all these bits and pieces?” she says in her latest blog post (about arm swing – featuring Judy Garland). “It’s because with Parkinson’s, we lose the ability to move unconsciously. But if we understand how things work, we can put it back together. It may require a conscious effort but at least we have the opportunity to move with coordination, fluidity, skill and awareness.”

Do you have any tips for moving or walking with PD, or favorite songs that keep you moving? Make a comment below!

On PatientsLikeMe, dozens of patients have reported trying various forms of dance to help manage their condition. Take a look.

A note from Pam: The content of this post is intended to provide experiential advice from a fellow patient about ways of moving to help manage your PD. It is in no way intended as a substitute for medical consultation. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider before engaging in any new exercise program. Pamela Quinn or PD Movement Lab will not be responsible for any injury or harm you sustain in performing any exercises or following any advice presented here in. 

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How Heart Attack Warning Signs Differ in Women

Posted February 21st, 2012 by

A heart attack is unmistakable, right?  Not exactly.  And especially not if you’re a woman.

Elizabeth Banks in "Just a Little Heart Attack"

We kicked off February by recognizing National Wear Red Day and sharing a hilarious video created by actress Elizabeth Banks for American Heart Month.  In the short piece, a harried working mother begins having strange symptoms one morning, including tightness of the jaw, dizziness, nausea, shortness of breath, muscle pain and pressure on her chest.  Despite all of this, she remains more concerned about getting her husband and kids off to work and school, respectively.  Her son is the only one to recognize what’s going on, saying “Mom!  I think you’re having a heart attack.”

Part of 2012 Heart Month message is that the warning signs of a heart attack for women can be different than for men.  Unlike the stereotypical image of a man clutching his chest and falling down, heart attacks may appear less dramatic in women.  For example, a woman can experience a heart attack without severe chest pressure (“an elephant sitting on my chest”).  Also, women are somewhat more likely than men to report more subtle symptoms such as back or jaw pain, shortness of breath and nausea/vomiting.  The danger is that even when the signs are subtle, the consequences can be deadly.

The Key Statistic Behind This Year's American Heart Month

Would you be shocked to have a heart attack?  That’s what many women report – that they never thought it could happen to them.  As a result, they assume their discomfort must be something more routine like the flu, acid reflux or normal aging.  They also may downplay it in order to put their family’s needs first.  Don’t make this mistake.  A heart attack strikes someone every 34 seconds, and heart disease is the number one killer of women.  So if you think you or someone you love might be having a heart attack – even if the symptoms are subtle – don’t wait more than five minutes before calling 911.

Beyond knowing the warning signs, a little prevention (such as quitting smoking or walking just 30 minutes a day) goes a long way.  Learn your heart attack risk – as well as how you can lower it – with the American Heart Association’s Risk Calculator.