2 posts tagged “tricks”

13 spring cleaning + laundry hacks when you have a health condition

Posted April 5th, 2018 by

Pain, fatigue and other symptoms can make spring cleaning and household chores… stink! We’ve rounded up some tips, tricks and life hacks for cleaning and doing laundry when you have a health condition.

1. Make a plan. Write out your cleaning to-do list (or find a free printable one online) and tackle your top priorities first. Pace yourself, even if it means spreading your chores out over several days or weeks. Think of spring cleaning as spring/summer cleaning – no rush.

2. Set time limits. Chelle Iredale, a writer for The Mighty who’s living with fibromyalgia, knows her cleaning limits: “15 minutes is a good amount of time for me,” she says. “Do what you can in that amount of time, then take a break. Re-evaluate how you’re feeling after each chore so you don’t overdo it.” Try to squeeze in some quick scrubbing or dusting sessions during TV commercial breaks.

3. Become a “no shoe” household. So what, if a few guests grumble? This rule will cut down on dirt. “When it comes to your health, do what’s best for you – not the masses,” Chelle says.

4. Pick products that make cleaning easier. It might be time to retire that ol’ mop and broom, writes Justina Bonilla, another Mighty contributor. Time-saving products like cleaning wipes, disposable dusters and wet mops can work wonders. You can even buy dust mop slippers and microwave steam cleaners these days. Also, shop online for cleaning supplies so you can take stock of your current stash and remember what you need.

5. Make things fun and comfortable. Listen to music. Or a podcast. Or an audio book. Anything that entertains or motivates you will make your cleaning session a little better, Justina says. Also, try to stay as comfy as possible by doing some chores sitting down (such as cleaning the kitchen table or wiping floor boards) and using a padded surface (think: garden kneeling pad or thick yoga mat).

6. Give into the urge to purge. Spring feels like a new beginning, which can make it a little easier to part with old clothes and clutter. Go with it! Less stuff = less work. While you’re at it, ditch some of your baskets and bins where junk mail and unworn shoes pile up.

7. Ask for help. Know someone who loves to clean and declutter? Time to phone a friend! And next time your birthday or the holidays roll around, consider asking for gift cards for a cleaning service or a new gadget (think lightweight or robo-vacuum) that’ll make cleaning easier.

Bonus: 6 laundry shortcuts! The Mighty recently shared a list of 24 laundry hacks for people with chronic illness, and here are a few favorites:

  • Skip the hamper — leave the washing machine lid open and ask everyone in your household to put dirty clothes straight in the washer at the end of the day.
  • Invest in a “grabber” to pick up dirty clothes off the floor.
  • Set a stool or folding/camping chair near the washer/dryer to sit on and help prevent fatigue.
  • Rather than sorting by color, sort into two baskets: one for pants, and the other for tops, socks and underwear — which makes for easier sorting/folding later.
  • If you have closet space, quit folding and hang everything on a hanger.

Got any tried and true tips for tackling chores with a health condition? Join PatientsLikeMe today to connect with others and swap ideas like these!

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3 energy-saving tips for people with lupus

Posted March 31st, 2017 by

lupus fatigue tips

Fatigue can be a big deal when you have lupus. About 43 percent of PatientsLikeMe members with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are tracking fatigue as a symptom say that it’s “severe.” A rough day can feel like “walking through knee-deep water,” notes one member.

Here’s a roundup of energy-saving tips from a few different sources (spoiler alert: routines and planning ahead can help):

  1. A PatientsLikeMe member’s advice: schedule, schedule, schedule. “You can’t schedule too much with lupus because one activity can knock you out,” she says. “I learned to say no in advance to over-scheduling social engagements or things that would keep me out too late or keep me from getting enough sleep.” She also sets alarms and reminders on her phone to keep her on track, including one at 9:30 every night that says, “Time to unwind” – put away electronics, take meds and go to bed.
  1. Hint from a writer with lupus: manage your mornings. Heather Glantz, who has been living with lupus for more than 20 years, says it took her several years to nail down a morning routine that preserves energy for the rest of the day.

lupus fatigue tips

“I try to stay in bed as much as possible before I start my day, so my curling iron, mirror, brush and makeup are all in a drawer next to my bed,” she writes. She has a bench in her shower and stays seated on her bed when she gets dressed. She also avoids clothes that need ironing or have lots of buttons, zippers and buckles – every little bit of energy counts.

  1. More scheduling pointers from the experts at the Lupus Foundation of America:  
    • Balance busy times with periods of rest throughout the day, if possible.
    • Prep meals in advance, whenever you have a bit more energy.
    • Plan ahead for big events like the holidays – shop for gifts throughout the year.
    • Establish good sleep patterns. (PatientsLikeMe bonus tip: iPhones have a new “Bedtime” feature that reminds you when it’s time to hit the hay based on how many hours of sleep you’d like to get – pretty cool.)

Is fatigue a symptom you’re living with? Make sure you’re tracking it so you can see how you’re doing over time. Do you have a routine that helps you manage fatigue? Add a comment on what works for you.

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