7 posts tagged “Transplants”

Listen Up! Here Comes The Patient Voice

Posted January 20th, 2011 by

In addition to hearing from you through our PatientsLikeMe newsletters, we sometimes get a chance to meet you in person to hear what you have to say about living with your condition.   Here are two videos highlighting interviews we conducted in 2010 with patients just like you.  In the first video, you’ll hear directly from members of our Parkinson’s Community, representing Team PatientsLikeMe at the 2010 Parkinson’s Unity Walk.  The second video is from the U.S. Transplant Games, where we interviewed YellowisJoy, a member of our Transplant Community and National Kidney Foundation’s Team Mid New England. Listen up – here comes the patient voice!

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Comparing Our Transplants Community to the UNOS/OPTN Databases

Posted January 13th, 2011 by

Last November (2010), PatientsLikeMe was fortunate to have the opportunity to showcase our research at the world’s largest gathering of kidney and kidney transplant professionals.  The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) annual meeting is the premiere event platform for debuting revolutionary treatments, cutting-edge technological breakthroughs and top research findings.

PatientsLikeMe presented a poster about our Transplants Community to more than 12,000 physicians, scientists and other healthcare professionals from all 50 states and around the world.  The poster was very well received, and it allowed us to introduce our relatively young Transplants Community to a wide array of industry professionals, many of whom will pass the word on to their patients.

screen-shot-2011-01-13-at-35839-pmThe poster we presented was elegant yet simple in its design.  Essentially, we compared the profile of our Transplants Community – now with more than 3,100 patient members – to published data from the United Network for Organ Sharing/ Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (UNOS/OPTN) databases.  What did we find?

  • About half of our kidney transplant patients knew the exact degree of tissue matching they had with their donor (referred to as HLA matching)
  • The fewest HLA mismatches in kidneys came from deceased rather than living donors
  • Within the living donors, the closest matches came from siblings, followed by parents and children

These preliminary findings set the stage for more advanced research.  Our goal is to answer a number of questions that are important to patients like you.  For example, who is able to keep their transplanted organs the longest, and why?  Which pre- and post-transplant medication regimens are the easiest on you?  And what is the best outcome you can hope to achieve – and how can you get there?

Thanks to all of our transplants members for contributing to this exciting research.  With your help, we look forward to presenting the answers to these questions and more at future ASN conferences.

PatientsLikeMe member cbrownstein


Aligning Interests: A PatientsLikeMe Year in Review (Part VII – Business Development)

Posted January 12th, 2011 by

2010 was a strong year for business development at PatientsLikeMe.  Our goal was – and continues to be – to align patients’ needs with industry interests in order to maximize interaction between the two.  Here are a few of our successes and challenges over the year.

Successes

1.  New Partnerships, New Communities

In the first quarter of 2010, PatientsLikeMe launched two communities with corporate partners.  UCB helped us develop our Epilepsy Community, while Novartis partnered with us to create our Transplants Community.  Both communities have grown to more than 3,000 patient members and are now the largest of their kind in the world.

As with all of our partnerships, we made sure the focus is on the patient experience.   For example, what are your perceptions about the medications you take?  How do you see these treatments impacting your quality of life?  Getting quantifiable data on such questions can help our partners understand how they can help patients like you improve your health outcomes.

2.  Enhanced Services for Partners

When we create products and services for our corporate partners, it’s with a single objective:  to amplify the patient voice.  As a result, healthcare companies who wish to improve health outcomes have the information to improve their products and services accordingly.  In 2010, PatientsLikeMe further heightened the voice of patients by enhancing two existing products.

PatientsLikeMeListenTM and PatientsLikeMeLandscapeTM

screen-shot-2011-01-12-at-113913-amThese complementary services help measure both the frequency and sentiment of treatment discussions in our community forums.  In 2010, we added functionality that allows our partners to see a longitudinal comparative view of patient sentiment (using  PatientsLikeMeListenTM) as well as identify discussion topics that are rising within a forum (using PatientsLikeMeLandscapeTM ).  Both products help to elevate patient concerns and bring their importance and relevance to life for industry partners.

Challenges

As a for-profit health company that enables data sharing by patients, we knew we’d face our share of challenges.  2010 was no different.  Many groups, including patients, nonprofits, government and industry, had valid concerns about working with PatientsLikeMe because of our Openness Philosophy.

1.  Guidance on Industry Interaction with Social Media

One of the main (and valid) concerns our industry partners express is that the Food and Drug Administration has yet to deliver clear guidelines on how to interact with social media.  Dipping their collective toes into the social media wave pool is perceived as risky because the FDA levies severe penalties for companies attempting to directly sell to patients.

PatientsLikeMe has taken a leadership role in addressing this concern by further developing our PatientsLikeMeLeadersTM service. After investigating all privacy and regulatory conditions, PatientsLikeMe has created a fully compliant solution for direct industry-patient feedback in an online forum that we moderate.  Now you as patients will be heard directly by those making decisions on what treatments are developed and how they are introduced, while our partners can learn what patients like you want and need – without fear of non-compliance.

2.  Being Open About the Data Scraping Incident

In May 2010, we discovered that a major media monitoring company had created a patient account and automatically downloaded forum posts in order to add data to their sentiment analysis client service.  Not only is that a violation of our User Agreement (“You may not use any robot, spider, scraper, or other automated means to access the Site or content or services provided on the Site for any purposes.”), but it reduces the trust patients have with our site.

We dealt with this challenge openly by disclosing our discovery of this “data scraping incident” the day it occurred.  We sent a message informing all patient members, and about 200 patient members left the site as a result.  In October 2010, The Wall Street Journal included PatientsLikeMe in its special series on the benefits and risks of sharing health information online, with the practice of data scraping highlighted as a risk to patients.  We welcomed this article coverage and continue to engage with other leaders in this ongoing discussion.

Since our PatientsLikeMeListenTM product measures sentiment of discussions in our forums, we reminded our members about this similar service.  We will continue to inform and educate our members about how we conduct business so there are no surprises.

Summary

In 2010, we continued to grow our patient communities and further confirmed that the success of our business lies in aligning patient and industry interests.  In fact, we have recently been cited by the Board of Innovation as one of 10 Business Models That Rocked in 2010.

Because of the sensitivity of sharing health data online, however, we remain upfront, open and transparent about our business practices so that patients like you can be informed participants in your health, medical research and the development of effective treatments.  Happy 2011!

PatientsLikeMe member dwilliams


Overcoming Obstacles – Newsletter Highlight 2010

Posted December 27th, 2010 by

Last week, we posted highlights from our December community newsletter interviews. As we close out 2010, we want to spotlight another question asked this month – one that is relative to all members, all patients (no matter the condition).  What obstacles have you faced and overcome this year?

To review all of our newsletters, you can visit our archives page here.

* * *

2166 (Amy) What obstacles have you overcome this year?
ellie
(ellieGADsufferer – Mood Conditions Community)

First of all, I became well enough to leave my local psychiatric hospital after having been an inpatient for six months. My anxiety means that all new things – even getting on a bus to go somewhere new – make me have severe panic symptoms.

I now make sure I am out of bed by 0700hrs during the week and make myself go out at least three times per week, whether it is meeting friends for coffee or attending appointments. Otherwise I will return to “avoidance,” whereby I cut off all contact with friends and family, including calls and text messages.

kidneygirl (kidneygirl1198and0505 – Transplants Community)

I have had to deal with and overcome the struggles that come with tardive dyskinesia. Reglan has been black-boxed [with a FDA-mandated warning about the risk of tardive dyskinesia] over the past two years, but I took it for three or four years before that. [Read kidneygirl1198and0505’s Reglan treatment evaluation for more details.]

Signs of tardive dyskinesia may include: continuous and repetitive movements of the mouth, tongue, and jaw; facial grimacing; lip smacking, puffing of the cheeks; uncontrollable movements of the arms, legs, fingers, and toes; and swaying motions of the trunk or hips.

Mine has gotten so bad that I have regular grand mal seizures from time to time, and sometimes it’s hard to carry on a conversation without looking weird.

mtnlady (mountain lady – Parkinson’s Disease Community)

One of the biggest obstacles in my life this year was getting over the death of a very close friend.  This person became ill and died within a few months.  Her death made me more aware of how precious life is.

Another obstacle was in the adjustment of my medicine for Parkinson’s.  My doctor wanted me to try a new medicine with fewer long-term side effects.  I tried it for several months but did not do very well.  I am currently back on my original medicine, taking a little more than before, but I have readjusted well.

andrew (andrewn78 – HIV Community)

This year I overcame a hard breakup. It was difficult because I thought we were going to be together for a longer term relationship than we were (only nine months).

It was also difficult to start dating again. I forgot how many people don’t know much about how HIV is contracted and that there are many people who would never date someone who is living with HIV or will date someone living with HIV but the fear of contracting HIV puts too much of a damper on the relationship. It’s a difficult process.

tommymkr (Tommy Maker – ALS Community)

I’ve spent a lot of time this year getting used to the fact that I have become dependent on others.

Prior to diagnosis, I sat on the local council, was involved in the organization of all types of public elections and I was a trade union official. These were voluntary roles which involved helping others. Yet, initially, after diagnosis, I had an enormous difficulty accepting help from others. However, I’ve come to realize that I have a loving family, fantastic friends and very supportive colleagues. I have found that many of them don’t know what to do and are very glad when I am specific as to what they can do for me.

I’ve also learned that no question is too personal. I struggled a lot with questions about personal hygiene and when I found the courage to ask these most intimate questions, I found that the professionals were so familiar with the questions asked that, beyond the initial embarrassment, we quickly went on to find solutions. I have also found that when people ask questions about my condition, they are entitled to an answer, an honest answer.

nates (Nates-Sweetpea – Fibromyalgia/CFS Community)

Oh my, 2010 has been a huge year! I didn’t know how I was going to get through it whole, but here I am knocking on 2011, one step at a time. I had to rejoin the workforce on a part-time basis this year, after years of not working (not being able to work), but I had to as my husband had lost his job about 18 months previously, and we were facing bankruptcy!

So I’ve been working part-time since last February, about 17 to 32 hours a week. We did go through bankruptcy, lost our home, vehicles and our high 700’s credit score with it. But you know what, I survived.  Actually, no, I overcame, with the help of a very supportive Sunday School class, great friends, and a wonderful husband and daughter.

kg
(kg10043 – Epilepsy Community)

I work for the US Forest Service and, as of July, made it to retirement age still working. Two times they tried to force me to take a disability retirement. To keep working I have had to move around to several jobs in four different states because of my health. Not only have I made it to retirement age, but I am still working even though they are trying to get rid of me once again. (What a joke when you consider that the federal government has a quota for disabled employees).

It has meant I have not only had to work in a variety of locations, but doing different kinds of work. Just in the time on this forest I have worked as the Oracle DBA in the computer shop, in GIS, later in Forest Planning, with a crew of five Soil Scientists, a Botanist and myself mapping the soils and ecological types and writing recommendations for management.  And now for the last two years I have been “unfunded” and doing all kinds of random jobs for projects in the office. Just this year that has included supporting the USFS in legal challenges as well as jobs so simple as filing paperwork and addressing envelopes.

cobe (cobebu8 – MS Community)

For me, with multiple sclerosis and ADHD, my main problems have been the concentration to do what I need and want to do and fighting the progression of MS. I have RRMS [relapsing remitting MS] but since I have had it for 25 years, ever so slowly, it is progressing at the same time I get exacerbations. I have a new neurologist too, and he is part of a big group and getting through when I am having problems, is a problem.

Plus, with only SSDI [social security disability insurance] and not being able to find a part-time job, I have had to stop taking some needed meds and not going to necessary doctor’s appointments (e.g. my eye surgeon/doctor to see if the optic nerve is still swollen and I can’t do a necessary MRI because the insurance company won’t pay.) So to get help for my asthma, I am doing a research study to get free care. I haven’t found one for MS or depression yet.


PatientsLikeMe member lscanlon


Sharing and Learning with PatientsLikeMe

Posted December 22nd, 2010 by

In December community newsletters (launched earlier this week), we asked some of our members to think about what they’ve shared and compared in 2010.  Below are highlighted answers from each interviewee across all nine community newsletters.  Thank you for your contributions.

We also want to thank all of you who have contributed to the 90 newsletters we ran this year, including the newly launched ones in our Epilepsy and Transplants communities.  Finally, a special thanks goes out to our newsletter writer, Amy Morton, for pulling these together every month.

To review all of our newsletters, you can visit our archives page here.

* * *

2166 (Amy)

How has PatientsLikeMe helped you learn and share this year?

tommymkr (Tommy Maker – ALS Community)

PatientsLikeMe has provided me with new friends-people who are experiencing the same problems as I am. I’ve learned that there isn’t a single question that won’t get a vast myriad of answers from the community. I’ve learned that we’re all very different people, and I’ve learned we don’t always agree.  I’ve learned that we all care enormously for each other and are very eager to help those who find themselves in the same boat as we are. But most of all I’ve learned that I am not on my own.  I’m not the only one facing a bleak future and not the only one who is able to appreciate what he has at the moment.

cobe (cobebu8 – MS Community)

I really like it here in that I can keep track of all my meds with their side effects, etc.  Plus I like it that I can list symptoms and have a history of all of it to review and learn from and share with my doctors. I hope that my input on meds, therapies, etc., helps other people. It is good not to be alone.


mtnlady (mountain lady – Parkinson’s Disease Community)

It has given me the experience of reading about others who are in situations similar to mine.  It has shown me that I am not alone.  I love reading the newsletters and the comments from other readers. It also helps to keep me up-to-date on any new suggestions or treatments.

Also, I became acquainted with someone online through PatientsLikeMe.  We actually live in the same town, both work in the field of Education and have had Parkinson’s for the same length of time.  Getting together with her was a pleasure, and she introduced me to the idea of meeting with a support group, which I had never done before.

ellie
(ellieGADsufferer – Mood Conditions Community)

It is invaluable. I find the Symptoms and Treatments areas so helpful. I have learned (from genuine people who are taking these meds) that some of my “quirky” side effects and sufferings from the meds I take can and do happen to others and are not imaginary.  (My general practitioner and Consultant just brush the list aside and shrug their shoulders).

I have learned that I am not alone with my illnesses, which is good to know, and I have also learned that there is “light at the end of the tunnel.”  I try to keep my profile as up to date as possible in the hope that it will be helpful to at least one or two members. I rate my Daily Mood [now called InstantMe] at least five days per week and always complete my Mood Map, again for the same reasons.

Well done PatientsLikeMe and its members. Keep going, you are doing really good work and long may it continue.

andrew (andrewn78 – HIV Community)

I love organization and having PatientsLikeMe help me to organize all of my medical information. I would like to have an ability to log simple notes on the PatientsLikeMe profile so every time I go to my doctor I can make some general notes (if needed) for that visit on my experience and what was covered with my provider.

(Note that all users can now use InstantMe to add notes/annotations to your Doctor Visit Sheet)

nates (Nates-Sweetpea – Fibromyalgia/CFS Community)

PatientsLikeMe has been such an encouragement to me, not only in what others have given to me through sharing their stories, but also by opening up a window for me to be an encourager also. I love the newsletters that are super reminders of how to not get off track, and also how to be good to myself.

kg
(kg10043 – Epilepsy Community)

I think I have been pretty good at sharing, but this has been one new method, especially with some of the health issues with others facing similar situations. In the past I have answered questions for people who had their first seizure or just questions, but with this site, I am able to communicate with others who have had the same operations, take the same medications, etc., and really understand things better (from a different perspective).

kidneygirl (kidneygirl1198and0505 – Transplants Community)

PatientsLikeMe has helped me so incredibly much!  I’ve made so many friends that I thank God for every day.  It’s just like, no matter what you have or haven’t had transplanted, whichever organ you need or have, everyone on here understands you and what you’re going through.

I just really hope that people can say that about me.  It took me awhile, but no one is alone out there.  Everyone is going through their own personal struggles.  I just want everyone to know I am all ears!

PatientsLikeMe member lscanlon


Drug Safety: It’s About More Than Just Compliance

Posted September 30th, 2010 by

pillsEngaging in social media presents a number of uncertainties to pharmaceutical companies. In a world where much of the medical dialog has moved online, these uncertainties have emerged due to absent or unclear guidelines from the Federal Drug Administration (FDA), privacy and regulatory concerns about engaging directly with patients, and the potential for significant consequences.

When I recently spoke before the FDA, we highlighted how our pharmaceutical partners are taking a leadership role by navigating through these issues. In so doing, our partners are learning about real world experiences of patients and how to meet their adverse event reporting responsibilities in the PatientsLikeMe Epilepsy, Organ Transplant and Multiple Sclerosis communities.

“…as the FDA contemplates the Internet and social media as an emerging source of drug safety data, it is essential to consider what characteristics distinguish a social media site as being capable of contributing to drug safety in a meaningful, computable and quantifiable manner.”

Meaningful, computable and quantifiable are three words that underscore all that we do at PatientsLikeMe. This includes the creation of our patient safety program. Early on, we approached patient safety proactively with a pilot program in our Multiple Sclerosis Community. Launched in 2009, this program allows patients to voluntarily report adverse events that funnel to the FDA’s MedWatch system. Our system automatically pulls relevant data from the patient’s existing profile into an FDA 3500 form, dramatically reducing form completion time.

Going beyond that in areas where we work deeply with our pharma clients, we developed an integrated and comprehensive drug safety reporting platform that monitors patient data and free-text for potential adverse events. This data is then medically curated into standard MedDRA terminology and submitted electronically to meet regulatory timelines and reporting criteria. Of note, PatientsLikeMe is the only online health data platform in social media that has passed multiple drug safety compliance audits.

The reality today is that patients are sharing their real-life experiences with post-marketed drugs online. By using structured data collection tools within the PatientsLikeMe platform overseen by a drug safety professional, industry partners can improve patient safety.

This is about more than just compliance, though. We believe it’s about leadership – patients and pharma working together in new ways. Listening – to understand the positive and negative patient experience – is the right step in developing a trusted relationship. And this trust-based relationship is the only foundation upon which to build your social media strategy.

PatientsLikeMe member jamie


Know Thy Self – Measuring Your Quality of Life

Posted June 17th, 2010 by

Last Fall, PatientsLikeMe introduced our Quality of Life (QoL) tool which is displayed on the profiles of members in the HIV community.  By answering a few questions, patients can see how HIV is impacting them – physically, socially and mentally.  Today, this same QoL measure is used by thousands of patients across the HIV community and other communities, such as Epilepsy and Organ Transplants.

PatientsLikeMe Research Scientist, Michael Massagli, recently spoke with us in a PatientsLikeMeOnCallTM podcast interview about the goal, outcomes and benefits to measuring your quality of life. Listen here:

“[In the HIV community], we’ve taken a look at the relationship between QoL and CD4 level and find the average score of patients with CD4 below 200 is significantly lower for physical, mental and social well-being.  People with the most comprised immune systems have worse quality of life, across all 3 domains, than other patients… “

To date, several of our members have at least three QoL scores on their profile.  Mike says, “Multiple uses of the QoL instrument by the same person over time helps researchers determine how small a change in QoL scores is meaningful to patients or important enough to evaluate how a treatment is working.”

Adds R&D Director, Paul Wicks, “We all know that measuring disease is important; tumor size in cancer, blood tests in cardiovascular disease, or frequency of seizures in epilepsy, for instance. Increasingly though, clinicians and researchers are coming to realize that these measures don’t give the whole story; they’re missing the real impact of a condition on patient’s ability to function. You might have high blood pressure but it doesn’t affect your life at all, or you might have a relatively low amount of pain (as measured by, say a 0-10 pain scale), but it could be interfering with your work life a great deal.”

So have you completed a quality of life survey recently?  If so, you’ll also notice a cool new feature on the site that helps you better understand how your quality of life compares to others.  When you take 5 minutes to answer the 24 questions in the survey, here’s what you’ll see:

screen-shot-2010-06-16-at-105445-am

As Mike says in his podcast, this is just the beginning.  Stay tuned for more about quality of life measurements.