11 posts tagged “TBI”

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. Let’s learn more, together.

Posted March 21st, 2017 by

Brain injuries can happen to anyone, anywhere at any time. The important thing to know is that you’re not alone, which is the primary theme of Brain Injury Awareness Month organized by the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA).

At least 2.5 million children and adults sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the U.S. each year – on PatientsLikeMe alone there are 7000+ living with a traumatic brain injury. Take a look at the diverse community living with TBI on PatientsLikeMe:

Brain injury awareness gender spread

Brain injury awareness age groups

 

PatientsLikeMe members have spoken up about living with TBI, how they manage it and their initial thoughts after being diagnosed. Here’s what one member, Vicki, had to say about life after her diagnosis with TBI.

Want to get involved? There are a few different ways you can show your support during Brain Injury Awareness Month – you can share one of BIAA’s six promotional posters, better educate yourself and others about brain injuries with this fact sheet, or join the conversation on BIAA’s Facebook page.

If you’ve been diagnosed with a brain injury, join the more than 7,000 members on PatientsLikeMe who are living with traumatic brain injuries. Ask questions, track your experience and find a place in the community.

 

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“The most important thing is to know you are not alone” — Member Vicki opens up about her TBI

Posted September 13th, 2016 by

Vicki (Vickikayb) is an avid gardener, volunteers at a wildlife rehabilitation center and loves to cheer on the Kentucky Wildcats. She’s also been living with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) since 2004. In a recent interview, Vicki shared how she lives a full life in spite of her condition and how it’s inspired a new interest in brain injury advocacy: “Who better to give a voice to this cause than someone who is living with a TBI?”

Check out what she has to say about discovering new coping methods and finding support from others who understand.

Can you tell us a little about yourself? What are your hobbies and interests?

I am originally from the Kansas City area in Missouri until 2010 when I moved to Kentucky to be closer to my daughter and her family. I received my traumatic brain injury in 2004 from an impaired driver who rear-ended me going 74 miles per hour while I was at a dead stop.

I spend my time volunteering for Kentucky Wildlife Center in Lexington, KY. We take in all kinds of wildlife babies and rehabilitate them so that one day they can be released into the wild again. I helped them with a vision that they had to raise a vegetable garden with no pesticides which has been successful. I am also helping with a garden at Neuro Restorative where I attend therapy sessions. I find working in the dirt and growing plants, vegetables and flowers is a successful coping skill, which is helpful when I become emotional.

I also volunteer with Brain Injury Awareness of Kentucky. Just this past summer I helped distribute bicycle helmets, bringing awareness to the safety of riding a bicycle with proper equipment — a helmet — no matter what age. We fitted the helmets to children, teenagers and adults.

When it comes to watching sports on TV or at a stadium, I am there supporting my team, the Kentucky Wildcats. I am always eager to learn about different topics, especially brain injury, which is close to my heart. At the end of the day I am working towards being an advocate for any type of brain injury. Who better to give a voice to this cause than someone who is living with a TBI?

What was your diagnosis experience like?

Getting my diagnosis was the easy part for me; the difficult part was finding the right help I needed to start my journey to healing. At the time I was still living in Missouri and my daughter was living in Kentucky. So everything was left up to my doctor and me to work on my deficits, which at the time I didn’t view as severe. I participated in physical therapy and speech therapy until I hit the amount of units you were allowed per year on Medicaid. My daughter found out from other people that I was not doing as well as I was portraying. I was broke because of my impulsivity with money and I was sleeping on other people’s couches here and there. This is why at the end of 2009 I moved to Kentucky because my daughter was expecting her first child and I wanted to be close by.

Even in Kentucky I continued the downward spiral till I hit bottom, not taking my medication when prescribed, sleeping at odd times of the day and not eating well. That is when my family said they didn’t have the education or knowledge to be able to help me. That is how I ended up at NeuroRestorative in Georgetown in 2011. I started in the residential program where during the days I received occupational therapy, behavioral support, counseling, and speech therapy. Since that time, I have graduated from speech therapy and moved out on my own in November of 2012. I am fortunate that Kentucky has a waiver program that covers the cost of these services. I wish more states would have this option as well. This is when my journey to healing started!

In your profile you talk about writing down your thoughts as a form of therapy. How has it helped you manage your TBI? Do you have any other coping methods?

When I came to Neuro I had no idea what coping skills were, let alone how to practice them. First of all, I learned about the Coping Skills Triangle which consists of thoughts, behavior and emotions (pictured).

At first I started journaling for my sessions with my counselor so I wouldn’t forget to talk about certain topics. That’s when I started seeing that writing was a way to express myself. At the time they had a newsletter at NeuroRestorative in which I decided to write each month entitled, “Just My Thoughts,” where I would write about my struggles, coping skills and any issues that I was going through at the time. My purpose was to show other participants that they were not alone and that other people were struggling just like them. I have everything that I have written since 2012 and recently have put them all into a blog called “Learning Vicki.”

Furthermore, I have a big list of different coping skills that I use to help me when I feel overwhelmed or I’m not thinking clearly. I had them written down at first so I could pull them out when needed but today I find myself just doing them without thinking. Some of these coping skills are taking pictures of nature, walking my dog and visiting with my neighbors. At home I even turn up the radio and start dancing in my apartment. I do whatever brings enjoyment to me and takes my mind off the situation until I am ready to handle what is bothering me.

You’ve mentioned that “education is the biggest tool you can give other patients.” What’s the most important thing you’ve learned in your journey with TBI?

First of all, I have put myself out there to others to let them know that they are not alone on this journey. I feel the most important thing I have learned in this process is to share my experience. When I first found out that I had a brain injury, my thoughts were all over the place and I wondered what my next step would be.

I found out that a few of the people I went to high school with also had head trauma. So, I contacted them personally saying that I also had a TBI and maybe we could support one another. I kept talking to one friend in particular to see how he was doing and gave him an outline of how I began my treatment — who diagnosed me, how to talk to his doctor and how to receive therapeutic rehabilitation. That was a year ago, and I am happy to say that friend is now back at work and starting to regain some of his life back.

If I can’t answer a question for someone, I will see if I can find out the answer and get back to them. The most important thing no matter what disease or injury you might have is to know you are not alone and there are others who are either going through the same battle or have beaten it. We all need to be each other’ cheerleaders, to encourage each other to hang on because tomorrow is going to be better and we will get through it together.

How has it been connecting with others on PatientsLikeMe?

It has been a wonderful experience being able to talk to other people who are going through the same illness that I’m experiencing. It helps because you realize, “I am not the only person going through this or that feels like this.” It has also taught me to be thankful for what I have. It has been a tool to educate myself on what some other people might be trying or what didn’t work. I love being able to keep track of my moods, my emotion charts and how I’m feeling overall, and to read others’ messages of encouragement.

I also like sharing my data with researchers to help them with clinical trials, and being able to find articles that help me better understand my condition. It is great to be able to go to one site and find everything that you need. I wish I had known about PatientsLikeMe back in 2004. Every chance I get I tell people to go check the site out!

 

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Brain Injury Awareness Month: Roxana’s story from our partners at One Mind

Posted March 21st, 2016 by

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, so we’re sharing the story of Roxana Delgado, whose husband Victor is one of the 2.5 million Americans who survive traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) each year.1

In this video from our partners at One Mind, Roxana opens up about the challenges of caring for Victor after he suffered a TBI while serving in Afghanistan in 2009. Roxana says, “Research is something that is needed to be able to meet the needs of this population, to identify, diagnose and treat brain injuries.”

Here’s what else she has to say:


Having trouble watching the video? Click the button below:

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury, share your experience and connect with more than 5,000 TBI members in the injuries and traumas forum on PatientsLikeMe.

 

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1 http://www.biausa.org/brain-injury-awareness-month.htm


From our partners at One Mind: Zack Lystedt’s football story

Posted December 17th, 2015 by

Accidents happen, anywhere to anyone. Whether it’s from playing soccer or football, snowboarding, riding a bike, competing in synchronized swimming, slipping on ice or falling off of a ladder. In sports, even with the best safety procedures in place, there are still accidents. That’s why our partners at One Mind have started the #TreatBrainsBetter campaign. In this campaign, they share Zackery Lystedt’s story:

In October 2006, 13-year-old middle school football player Zackery Lystedt collapsed from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) when he was allowed back into a game just 15 minutes after suffering a concussion. From the time of his injury, Zack spent the next three months in a coma, nine months before speaking his first word, 13 months before moving a leg or an arm, 20 months living on a feeding tube, and nearly three years before standing with assistance on his own two feet.

Zack and his family worked tirelessly to change the rules around concussion, and in May 2009, Washington State enacted the Zackery Lystedt Law, becoming the first state in the nation to enact a comprehensive youth sports concussion safety law. Today, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have followed suit by enacting strong concussion safety laws called “Return to Play” laws. This is the fastest growing public safety initiative to go into law in all 50 states. Nine years later, Zack continues daily therapies and is regularly asked to speak on the dangers of mismanaged concussions. We applaud Zack and his family for their tireless efforts to protect young athletes from returning to the game too soon.

With support from the Lystedt Family, One Mind is also working to protect athletes by advancing the research and supporting studies around concussions and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Although strides have been made in brain research, our understanding of the brain has a long way to go – some say brain research is where heart research was 50 years ago. One Mind is working with brain scientists across the US and around the world to find answers for concussions and other brain injuries and diseases by supporting researchers collaborating to come up with answers sooner.

Learn more about One Mind and the #TreatBrainsBetter campaign.

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Joining the effort to find answers from brain diseases and injuries

Posted November 11th, 2015 by

In honor of Veterans Day, we wanted to share two stories from our partner, One Mind.

First, the story of retired Colonel Gregory Gadson, who was wounded during his military service and was living with post-traumatic stress (PTS). PTS affects more than 7.7 million Americans each year.

The second video shares the story of Roxana Delgado, Ph.D. Roxana’s husband Victor was hit by an IUD during military service. She has lived the emotional toll of being his caregiver.  

If you’re a veteran, you can connect with more than 9,300 others in the PatientsLikeMe Veterans forum. Together, we can join the effort to find answers to brain diseases and injuries.

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“I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress” – An interview with PTS and TBI member Trevor

Posted October 14th, 2015 by

Trevor Martin, a Veteran of the United States Army was deployed to Afghanistan twice from 2009 to 2012 and was later diagnosed with both a mild TBI and PTS. He joined PatientsLikeMe to connect with others living from these conditions. Our friends over at PatientsLikeMe sat down with Trevor to learn more about his life with PTS and TBI. Here’s what we learned….

Some people talk about PTSD ‘triggers.’  Do you know your triggers, or do symptoms happen unexpectedly?

I know some of my triggers, like trash on the side of the road. In Afghanistan they would put IEDs under piles of trash to hide them on the side of the road. So I know if I see that today, my heart starts to race, I get hyper-vigilant, and I start to think something’s about to happen that I need to avoid.

You mentioned that you feel a lot of pressure to be who you were before the war.  How are you different since returning home? 

I used to be the fun guy. All my friends would come to me and we’d go out and go shooting and joke around. It’s hard now because a lot of my friends don’t really understand. They don’t really know what I’ve gone through and what I’ve seen because it’s hard to talk about. The friends that I have told don’t really believe it.

What has it been like connecting with other vets on PatientsLikeMe?  

There are things you’ve done or seen that you will never forget. I don’t want anyone to ever imagine the things I see when I close my eyes at night. I wouldn’t wish that on anyone. It takes a lot for me to come out and talk about it. It’s been easier to connect with people online instead of in person. If I hadn’t found the site, I honestly don’t think I’d be here right now.

I haven’t been on this site for very long but man, I’m glad I found it. Since telling my story in a forum called “PTSD, my story and a cry for help” a couple months ago and reading all of your stories, I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress within myself. I’ve only had maybe 5 “freak outs” since joining. Whereas I was having 5 a day before. Half of the battle is knowing that you’re not alone in this, we’ve all done and seen different things but in reality, we’re all the same.

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Tackling brain illness, together

Posted September 4th, 2015 by

Our partners at One Mind are advocating for a better understanding of the brain in general, and they’ve narrowed it down to a single statement:

Our brains need answers.

And that’s why they launched the “Needs” campaign story, underneath the hashtag #BrainsNeedAnswers. Think about it – what does your brain, or the brain of a friend or family member, need? It’s not just about researching better treatments or improving the diagnostic process for conditions like PTS and TBI. Rather, it’s about everybody coming together to share their own experiences with brain injury to help raise awareness and increase general knowledge about brain health. Tankmartin, a PTS member of PatientsLikeMe, is the centerpiece of the campaign. Read what he had to say:

If you’d like to participate in the #BrainsNeedAnswers campaign, visit One Mind’s website to learn more about how you can make a difference. And if you’re living with PTS, TBI or another mental health condition, reach out to others like you in the PatientsLikeMe community and find the answers to your own brain questions.

Don’t forget to share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for #BrainsNeedAnswers.


You are not alone in brain injury

Posted March 16th, 2015 by

#NotAloneinBrainInjury. That’s the overarching theme of the 2015 Brain Injury Awareness Month, organized by the Brian Injury Association of America (BIAA). 2.5 million Americans survive a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year, and and it’s time to raise awareness for the 5.3 million people currently living with a brain injury.1

In addition, Wednesday, March 18 is “Brain Injury Awareness Day.” There are many different ways to get involved – you can share one of six promotional posters created by the BIAA, listen to several public service announcements and even get involved with the TBI Portrait Project.

Finally, don’t forget to share your support for TBI awareness on social media through the #NotAloneinBrainInjury hashtag. Just click on the Twitter icon below or spread the word on your Facebook page.

Our co-founder, Jamie Heywood, said it best when discussing PatientsLikeMe’s recent partnership with One Mind, a non-profit organization dedicated to benefiting all affected by brain illness and injury:

“We are both of one mind when it comes to the challenges of living with and researching these understudied and largely misunderstood conditions. Our partnership with One Mind and the individuals dealing with PTS and TBI will provide insights about effective treatments from people in the real world, and drive new understanding about gaps in care. It will also provide a new resource where people are empowered to help themselves as they learn how to live better with their condition.”

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with a TBI, join the more than 1,500 PatientsLikeMe members living with different traumatic brain injuries. The community is ready to answer any and every question you might have.

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1 http://www.biausa.org/brain-injury-awareness-month.htm


Give veterans access to the care they need

Posted March 11th, 2015 by

By Peter Chiarelli, retired U.S. Army general & CEO of our partner One Mind

As originally seen in the Washington Post

Soldiers listen as U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (not pictured) holds a question-and-answer session with U.S.military personnel at Kandahar Airfield in Kandahar February 22, 2015. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

 

The high-grossing film “American Sniper” was nominated for an Academy Award for best picture, but it deserves higher honors for highlighting one of the greatest causes of casualties in our recent wars: post-traumatic stress (PTS).

The story of Iraq war veteran Chris Kyle, who was killed by a Marine veteran suffering from the effects of PTS and other mental-health problems, makes a powerful case that PTS needs to be a higher national priority. (You’ll note that I don’t include the word “disorder” at the end of PTS; the longer PTSD label actually discourages some service members from seeking treatment.) Since “American Sniper” debuted, Veterans Affairs and Defense Department leaders have been highlighting their programs for helping veterans diagnosed with PTS. But are those programs working?

In too many cases, the answer is no. Our PTS diagnostics remain crude, and no drugs have been approved specifically for treating the condition. Complicating matters, because of genetic and other differences among individuals, patients react differently to varying drugs and dosages. Finding the right mix can be a frustrating saga of trial and error. The wrong drug or dose can, if not caught in time, become a factor in other serious mental-health and behavioral issues, even including suicide.

It only makes sense that once Defense Department doctors identify an effective treatment for a service member, that same treatment should be available when the service member leaves active duty and moves to VA for care. More often than not, however, it is not.

The disconnect occurs because Defense has an all-inclusive drug formulary that allows clinicians to prescribe almost any medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration, while VA has a very limited formulary, primarily to control costs. Medically discharged service members who are given a 90-day supply of PTS prescriptions eventually must report to their VA medical facility for refills, where they are often denied — not for medical reasons but because the medications they rely on are not on VA’s approved list.

This is not a case of one prescriber issuing Bayer aspirin while another uses Saint Joseph. Service members whose symptoms are being controlled by specific anti-depressant, anti-anxiety or anti-psychotic drugs, as well as pain and sleep medications, are forced to give them up and search for a replacement — often a painful and dangerous process — simply because Congress has failed to require Defense and VA to harmonize their drug formularies.

Let me be clear: The problem is not that doctors within the two systems disagree over which drugs should be part of their formularies. Their hands are tied. They must operate within the rules set out by Congress.

Rather than repeating the laborious process of finding another drug that works, many veterans have told me they sought out private providers to fill their prescriptions, usually paying for their medications out of pocket. Imagine how they feel about VA when their first experience with the agency is a doctor telling them they cannot fill a prescription that has relieved their PTS symptoms for months or even years. In some cases, the veteran is not even given enough of the recommended drug to safely discontinue its use.

I have testified about this serious discrepancy, most recently as a member on the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission, and have discussed it privately with members of Congress. A few have said they will try to address the problem, but most have declined, citing the added cost to VA of a fuller formulary and the time the Government Accountability Office would require to determine the budgetary impact of such a change. Shouldn’t the long-term cost, danger and social impact of denying vital medications to veterans provide a sufficiently compelling reason for Congress to act?

The obvious solution is to include the same medications in both formularies. If this is not possible, Defense Department doctors should exhaust all the options available on VA formulary first before considering any drugs not covered by VA. If neither of these options can be adopted, Defense doctors should at least warn service members that their current prescriptions will be unavailable in the VA system.

This problem needs to be fixed immediately. A directive released by VA in late January seeking to address the problem without correcting the misaligned formularies contains too many loopholes and is totally inadequate. We need a solution, and not a patch. Chris Kyle’s death underlines the urgency of providing effective treatments for PTS. We can start by getting the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments on the same page.

Learn more about One Mind.

Read what the PatientsLikeMe community is saying about Peter Chiarelli’s article.


Raising awareness on Veteran’s Day

Posted November 11th, 2014 by

Right now, there are almost 22 million American veterans living in the United States, and every one of them has a story to tell. So today, we’re honoring their service by raising awareness for life after the military.

Like many others who are living with chronic conditions, the injuries our military men and women sustain are not always visible. Thousands of veterans are affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 30,000 have been diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) since 2000 and many others are living with depression. Sometimes their symptoms don’t even manifest until many years after their service.

These eye-opening statistics are why we’ve recently announced a new multi-year collaboration with One Mind to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress traumatic brain injury, or both. We’ll work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research.

If you’re looking to learn more about US veterans, head to your nearest book store and grab a copy of “For Love of Country,” Howard Schultz’s and Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s new book (just released on November 4). Check out the video synopsis below:

 

There’s also the Concert for Valor today – it’s a free live event that is being organized on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for veteran’s awareness. If you can’t make it in person, tune in on iHeartRADIO.

If you’re a veteran living with PTS or TBI, you can find others and connect to people who understand what you’re going through on PatientsLikeMe. There are more than 4,000 of members in the Veterans Forum, and every day, veterans are learning more about their health and the best ways to cope. Share a bond, and live better, together.

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A Traumatic Brain Injury Can Happen to Anyone

Posted March 18th, 2013 by

Did you know that 1.7 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury each year?  Or that the term includes any type of blow, bump or jolt to the head or penetrating head injury that disrupts normal brain function?

Brain Injury Awareness Month Banner

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, a time for reinforcing the seriousness of head injuries, given that traumatic brain injuries are a contributing factor in a third of all injury-related deaths in the US.  In addition, 3.1 million individuals are living with life-long disability as a result of a traumatic brain injury. Some common causes of these injuries are falls, car accidents, workplace accidents and assaults, but the effects can vary greatly from person to person.  No two brain injuries are alike.

Brain Injury Global Picnic Logo

Are you living with a traumatic brain injury?  Share your symptom and treatment histories with the 500+ members of PatientsLikeMe’s traumatic brain injury community and discuss your experiences in our Injuries and Traumas Forum.  In addition, consider raising awareness in your area by getting involved with the Brain Injury Global Picnic, which takes place September 21, 2013.  The goal is to organize 1,000 picnics around the world – thus setting the Guinness World Record for the most people picnicking in a 24-hour period – to promote awareness, education and change.