12 posts tagged “sleep”

Talking medication and sleep for National Sleep Awareness Week

Posted April 24th, 2017 by

Do medications disturb sleep?

Did you know this week is National Sleep Awareness Week? Sleep disorders affect around 50-70 million US adults, and troubled sleep is common within the patient community – just take a look at the results from a patient poll we did with you in 2015. There are many reasons someone might be struggling with a sleep disorder, and one of the contributors could be when you take your medication.

Some medications cause drowsiness, while others can keep you awake, so taking your medication at a certain time could impact your sleep schedule. Below are some medications that can affect sleep. Make sure you talk to your doctor before making any changes on your own!

  • Anti-arrhythmics (for heart rhythm problems)
  • Beta blockers (for high blood pressure)
  • Clonidine (for high blood pressure)
  • Corticosteroids (for inflammation or asthma)
  • Diuretics (for high blood pressure)
  • Cough, cold, and flu medications that contain alcohol
  • Headache and pain medications that contain caffeine
  • Nicotine replacement products
  • Sedating antihistamines (for colds and allergies)
  • SSRIs (for depression or anxiety)
  • Sympathomimetic stimulants (for attention deficit disorder)
  • Theophylline (for asthma)
  • Thyroid hormone (for hypothyroidism)

Find out more.

Think your medication might be causing difficulty with your sleep schedule? Bring it up with your doctor, they may be able to work with you on finding a solution. You can also join the conversation on PatientsLikeMe, there are over 31,000 topics in the forum on sleep!

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Sleep and Daylight Saving: 3 ways to spring forward with confidence

Posted March 10th, 2017 by

Daylight Savings adjustment

Daylight Saving Time is here again. This Sunday, March 12th, clocks will move forward one hour from 2:00am to 3:00am. While the hour change may seem small, it can have a big impact on sleep and health.

Want to hit snooze? You might feel sleepier than usual Monday morning since the average person sleeps 40 minutes less the night following spring Daylight Saving Time than usual. From taking medication at the same time every day to finding the energy for an afternoon walk, many people rely on daily routines to manage their condition. For some, losing an hour of sleep can throw off more than just a sleep cycle.

Here are a few tips from the National Sleep Foundation to prepare yourself so you can stay on track and spring forward with confidence:

  1. Make sure you’re caught up on sleep. If you’re already sleep-deprived when Daylight Saving Time comes, it’s going to hit you harder than if you’ve been regularly getting seven to nine hours a night. So, in the week leading up to the time change, pay special attention to clocking the right amount of shut eye.
  2. Use light to your advantage. Light affects your sleep cycle. So, whenever possible, head outside early in the mornings and soak in some sunlight. At night, make sure you dim your lights when you want to signal to your body that it’s time to go to sleep and avoid staring at computer screens late in the day.
  3. Rethink your evening activities. Tweaks to your nighttime routine can help you drift off more easily—something that’s tough to do when you spring forward. A few important ones: Limit caffeine and alcohol intake in the hours leading up to bedtime and don’t schedule a nighttime workout.

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