2 posts tagged “sharing your information”

Living with a mental health condition? See these helpful pointers for your next job interview

Posted 5 months ago by

Unsure of how to navigate that job interview? You’re not alone. Members have exchanged their experiences and strategies here on PatientsLikeMe — from worrying about how to control nervous twitches to advice about not oversharing. Read on for more info about what you need to disclose to your potential employer, and hear how other members get through their interview jitters.

To disclose or not disclose? Sharing your mental health condition

“I’m damned if I’m open about it, and I’m damned if I try to hide it,” writes a person living with schizo-affective disorder in this Fast Company article. Weighing whether to disclose your condition and risk not getting the job against the stress of hiding a condition while performing a job isn’t easy. But Art Markman, PhD, professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, offers some guidance:

While you don’t have to disclose your mental health condition during the interview, Markman recommends that you should at some point set up supports at work for success. To get protection under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), you must tell your employer about your condition to get accommodations before there are any issues. This also enables your employer to structure your job in a way that might reduce stress.

Remember to breathe

Shana Burns, contributor to The Mighty advises dealing with anxiety you might have ahead of an interview by focusing on your breath:

“In through the nose, out through the mouth, count to 10 and slow everything right down. You are tingling because you are breathing too quickly, slow it down, and it will stop. This is a temporary feeling. It will not last forever.”

Burns adds, “Remember that you are OK; distract yourself — however you need to distract yourself, do it, and be kind to yourself.”

4 interview tips from PatientsLikeMe members

1. Overdressing is OK, but try not to overshare

“I have a Doctorate degree in Education. …I tend to want to overshare thinking it will make the interviewer realize that I know a lot about the subject or position. Oversharing things about myself frustrates my friends and family but at least they understand why…. I’m just trying to connect, but it is so out of [whack].”

“I have visible tattoos and piercings. I’m willing to remove a piercing while working if I have to. My tattoos are on my wrists…I plan on wearing long sleeves to the interview.”

2. Gaps in your resume? Practice what you want to say about your work history ahead of time

“I guess it’s a fine line between saying too much and just coming off as smart and enthusiastic…I always have too little to say. In my interview on Monday, the first thing they asked was ‘why aren’t you working up to your education?’ That, and gaps of time off due to illness, make a decent resume look suspicious to employers. I stammered something about ‘illness’ but should have been more prepared. Role playing is a good idea, at least for those painful questions. And I just have to keep doing it (ugh)…”

  • Tip: Speaking of preparing for tough questions, The Muse provides some common interview questions and coaching to how to answer them.

3. Show your interest in the company and the job

“Eye contact is very important. Smile. Sell your good points, you have many.”

“Learn a little bit about the company before going into the job interview (“I learned a little bit about the company going into the job. For example, I worked at Victoria’s Secret. So I learned what my favorite part about the company was. You can be a little cheesy and say things like ‘I love that _______ store remembers its audience. It’s a strong quality of this store to have sizes and styles for every shape.'”)

4. Come with questions (even simple ones)

“Have a question or two prepared for when they ask ‘So do have any questions for me?’ That shows that you are truly interested. They can be simple like what is the dress code or roughly how many hours will you work a week.”

What has your job interview experience been like? Do you have any helpful tips to share? Log in or join PatientsLikeMe and jump in the conversation.

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Transparency, Openness and Privacy

Posted May 20th, 2010 by

The following message was sent this morning to all members of PatientsLikeMe.  Please read what we have to say about openness, sharing and its privacy implications and join the conversation.

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Dear PatientsLikeMe Members,

What are the privacy implications of sharing in this open, online community?  We talk a lot about this and, as a company, strive to be transparent about the risks and rewards to sharing here.  Two recent events have prompted me to reach out to all the members of PatientsLikeMe to ensure we all understand openness, sharing and its privacy implications.

The first event happened last month when a patient asked us to remove all the data on his/her profile from the system.  The member wrote:

“The reason I’m leaving is I feel I didn’t fully understand the privacy impact of having all my health information for practically anyone in the world to see.”

We rarely receive a request like this, but since receiving this one, I have thought about it every day.   We do not want anyone to be surprised by the impact of sharing data on PatientsLikeMe.  We believe in openness, but we also want people to knowingly make the choice to be open with their health information.

This brings me to the second event.  Recently, we suspended a user who registered as a patient in the Mood community.  This user was not a patient, but rather a computer program that scrapes (i.e. reads and stores) forum information.  Our system, which alerts us when an account has looked at too many posts or too many patient profiles within a specified time interval, detected the user.  We have verified the account was linked to a major media monitoring company, and we have since sent a cease and desist letter to its executives.

While this was not a security breach, it was a clear violation of our User Agreement (which expressly forbids this type of activity) and, more significantly, a violation of the community’s trust.  Your Account Information (e.g. your names and emails) was NOT in danger of being stolen.  It is likely that the forum information that was “scraped” would be sold as part of that company’s Internet monitoring product.  In fact, we sell a similar service, PatientsLikeMeListenTM, to our clients so they better understand the voice of the patient.

What does this all mean to you?  What can you do?

  1. We recognize that people write very personal things in the forum and often use real names.  In any growing network of tens of thousands of members, there is no way to ensure that information you share in the forum or on your profiles will not be read by others.  Know that the information you enter in our system is shared (unless we tell you it is private, like full name and email in your Account Information).  It can and will be read by other patients, the PatientsLikeMe team, researchers, and others that use PatientsLikeMe, including our partners with whom we share de-identified data.
  2. Please weigh the benefits of sharing and the amazing value you all create in helping each other versus the risks of people, unknown to you, reading your posts.  Your input helps PatientsLikeMe and our partners learn about your disease and make better products to meet your needs.
  3. Learn and understand why we value openness.  If you haven’t, please read the Read This! FAQ.  If you want to know how we make money, you can take a look at this FAQ or go to our Partners Page and know that we sell your data and insights (but not your identity) to our customers.
  4. Consider the value of being part of the PatientsLikeMe community and make the right risk decisions for yourself.  Together, we can really change the way diseases are treated and managed by putting you, the patients, in the center of healthcare.  We can hold companies accountable for the strengths and weaknesses of their products and also help make those products better – but that requires openness and that is your choice.

We welcome your comments and questions and we love feedback. This has been posted on our blog, which is a good place to dialogue, as is the forum.

On behalf of the entire PatientsLikeMe team, I want to thank you for being part of our communities and sharing your experiences.

Sincerely,
Ben Heywood
President and Co-founder, PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood