8 posts tagged “rheumatoid arthritis”

Arthritis by the numbers: 50 million+ Americans live with it

Posted May 5th, 2017 by

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month. How many people are living with this condition? 53 million Americans and counting. Various forms of arthritis – including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus and fibromyalgia – are all on the rise, according to the CDC.

arthritis awareness month

Let’s look at some other facts and stats about arthritis, courtesy of the Arthritis Foundation:

  • 67 million – the estimated number of Americans who’ll be living with arthritis by 2030
  • 300,000 – the number of babies, kids and teens living with arthritis or a rheumatic condition today
  • Nearly 1 million – the number of hospitalizations each year due to arthritis
  • 172 million – the combined number of work days people with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis miss every year
  • $156 billion – the annual cost of arthritis in terms of lost wages and medical expenses
  • # 1 – arthritis is the nation’s top cause of disability

arthritis awareness month

Arthritis experts are also concerned that more than half of people with arthritis are also living with heart disease or diabetes, and they typically have worse outcomes because of activity limitations.

Who’s tracking arthritis and related conditions on PatientsLikeMe?

 

Connect with people living with these conditions in the Muscle, Bones and Joints Forum and the Immune, Inflammatory and Infections Forum.

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Top Rheumatoid Blogs of 2016

Posted February 2nd, 2017 by

Today is Rheumatoid Awareness Day and this year we wanted to share some of the top rheumatoid arthritis blogs that were included in Healthline’s 16 Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Blogs of 2016 list:

  1. Itis

Stay up-to-date to learn about RA’s long-term effects and practical tips for living with RA. This blogger’s socks help treat the pain of RA and of Raynaud’s, (an autoimmune blood vessel dysfunction that sometimes co-occurs with RA).

2. All Flared Up

This blog is about “living rather than wallowing” with RA. Check in to see how blogger Amanda is learning to understand her body and how it works with RA.

3. Arthritic Chick

Before Arthritic Chick was finally diagnosed with RA, she suffered with pain in her hands, feet and ribs for years. On her blog, she shares the good days, and her bad days with openness, honesty and strength.

4. An Attitude of Gratitude

Julie Faulds’ easygoing blog gives us a peek into her life with her family, thunder-phobic dog — and, her RA and fibromyalgia. Julie chooses an “attitude of gratitude” and her bad days make her good days better and brighter. Always an advocate of finding the positive, she suggests thinking of your RA downtime as a “spa day” instead of a sick day.

5. Carla’s Corner

Carla Kienast’s RA journey has included knee, hip, and back surgery and her posts cover everything from the latest CDC guidelines, to how her 12 doctors each have just a glimpse of her whole self, through the lens of each of her individual health issues.

Want to see what other blogs made the list? Check out the Top 16.

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Rheumatoid Awareness Day: 7 things you might not know about RA

Posted February 2nd, 2016 by

Today is Rheumatoid Awareness Day, and we’re spreading the word about the condition that affects over 9,000 PatientsLikeMe members. Rheumatoid disease can manifest in many different ways – fatigue, joint pain, stiffness and fever, to name a few — so it can be hard to understand the full scope of this condition. To show the world what living with #TheRealRD is like, the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation has shared these seven interesting facts:

1.Rheumatoid disease is not a type of arthritis; arthritis is just one symptom.

Rheumatoid disease (RD) is a systemic disease related to immune function that can affect any part of the body including the heart, lungs, eyes, skin or joints.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Available treatments are not adequate for many people with moderate to severe rheumatoid disease.

About 1/3 of patients don’t respond to available biological disease modifying drugs. 

3. Rheumatoid disease is different in each person — and even in the same person over time.

Some people experience constant pain, and some have a series of “flares” and periods of lower disease activity. Symptoms can vary greatly from day to day

4. RA research is severely underfunded in the U.S.

RD is funded at about 1/12th the per-patient rate of similar diseases with comparable impact.

5. Rheumatoid disease is often an invisible illness.

Just because someone with RD looks good doesn’t mean he or she feels good.

6. Early, aggressive disease treatment has been shown to provide the best outcomes.

Those whose disease has been treated early have the best chance at achieving remission or low disease activity.

7. Remission is rare. Pain is not.

Remission rates have been reported as low as 6% in the average clinical environment. Most people with RD experience pain every day.

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Spreading the word for arthritis

Posted May 23rd, 2014 by

Lupus? Check. Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS? Check. ALS, cystic fibrosis, Huntington’s disease, mental health, schizophrenia, anxiety and depression? Check!

There’s been a ton of awareness going on in May, but there’s still one more theme to go – National Arthritis Awareness Month. This month, the Arthritis Foundation (AF) is encouraging us all to spread the word to everyone we know.

According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe over 100 medical conditions and diseases, known as rheumatic diseases.1 The CDC estimates that 52.5 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia).2 Common symptoms generally include, but are not limited to:

  • Joint pain
  • Stiffness
  • Inflammation or swelling (most frequently in the hips, knees, hands and wrists)

If you’d like to learn more, the ACR has gathered a wealth of information on all the different kinds of arthritis. And if you’re not sure how to participate in Arthritis Awareness Month, here are a few places to start:

Finally, with over 6,000 members, the rheumatoid arthritis community is the largest group of arthritis members on PatientsLikeMe, but many more are living with osteoarthritis (3,994) psoriatic arthritis (1,278) and other forms of the inflammatory condition. They’re donating their personal health data to help others learn about life with arthritis, and they’re always sharing in the forum about symptoms, treatments, advice and more.


1 https://www.rheumatology.org/about/arthritismonth.asp

2 http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/arthritis_related_stats.htm


Patients as Partners: The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale questionnaire results

Posted April 18th, 2014 by

Back at the beginning of April, we launched a new blog series called Patients as Partners that highlights the results and feedback PatientsLikeMe members give to questionnaires on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. This time around, we’re sharing the results of the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS), a health measure that looks at how confident people are in managing their own conditions. More than 1,500 members from 9 different condition communities on PatientsLikeMe took part. They worked with our research partner Ken Wallston from Vanderbilt University to make the tool the best it can be. (Thank you to everyone that participated! This is your data doing good.) Check out the PMCSMS results and keep your eyes peeled for more ORE questionnaire results as we continue the series on the blog.

What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.


First-Ever Rheumatoid Awareness Day

Posted February 2nd, 2013 by

In an ongoing effort to raise awareness, the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation (RPF) has now established February 2nd as Rheumatoid Awareness Day. This is the first time ever that a day has been designated for rheumatoid disease and it will give a voice to the millions who are living with this condition.

rheumatoid-awareness-day

Rheumatoid disease (also known as rheumatoid arthritis) affects nearly 2 million people in the U.S. and one percent of people worldwide. It’s a progressive inflammatory disease causing joint and organ damage that can lead to severe pain and joint disabilities. Studies have also shown that rheumatoid disease has an impact on the heart causing higher incidence of stroke for patients.

Want to get involved? The RPF is hosting several social media events and is asking everyone to share educational materials via social sites and blogs to raise awareness.

You can also connect with other rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients just like you on PatientsLikeMe. Nearly 5,000 RA patients are tracking their health and learning from each other’s shared experiences every day. Add your voice to this growing community.


Mayo Clinic. 2011. Mayo Clinic Determines Lifetime Risk of Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis. http://www.mayoclinic.org/news2011-rst/6137.html?rss-feedid=1

Jesper, L et al. British Medical Journal. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis: Danish nationwide cohort study. http://www.bmj.com/content/344/bmj.e1257


Spirited Support at the Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

Posted December 24th, 2012 by

We’ve sponsored hundreds of fundraising teams through our PatientsLikeMeInMotion program, but we’re pretty sure this team wins the blue ribbon for most festive.

Yes, This Is the First Time We've Seen a PatientsLikeMe T-shirt Worn with a Red and Green Tutu

Please meet PatientsLikeMe member Kennqueen’s very colorful team, who donned their best tutus and striped socks for the Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis in Richland, Washington, on November 17, 2012.  Kennqueen has been living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for more than a decade, and her supportive family and friends came out to raise spirits and jingle in her honor while raising money for the Arthritis Foundation.

Festive from All Sides!

This particular Jingle Bell Run/Walk in Richland, Washington, part of the Tri-Cities area, raised more than $20,000 for arthritis research, while all Jingle Bell events across the country have raised more than seven million dollars to date!  How’s that for some holiday cheer?

Life Is Better with Teammates!

Inspired to get into the fundraising spirit in 2013?  Learn how the PatientsLikeMeInMotion program can help with t-shirts and a monetary donation for your team.

Until then, Happy Holidays from PatientsLikeMe!


Get Moving for Arthritis Awareness Month

Posted May 3rd, 2012 by

Did you know that arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the US?  Or that this disease – which affects some 50 million Americans – has more than 100 different types?

Why Is Movement Important?  Obesity Prevalence Is 54% Higher in Adults with Arthritis.

May is Arthritis Awareness Month, a nationwide event sponsored by the Arthritis Foundation (AF) to raise awareness and funds.  All across the country, Arthritis Walks will be held this month as part of the Let’s Move Together campaign, which encourages people everywhere to get moving to prevent or treat arthritis.  That’s because walking is an easy, effective way to keep your joints mobile, lose weight and boost overall health.

Another way you can get involved is by honoring a loved one who is living with (or lived with) arthritis through Hope Through Heroes.  Celebrate your father, mother or another important person in your life by sharing their inspirational story.  Then email your tribute or memorial page to other friends and family, who can post their own testimonials and/or make donation in that person’s name.

Given that arthritis strikes 1 in 5 adults, you likely know someone with the condition.  But you may not know how extensive it is.  A common myth is that arthritis only occurs in old age.  Yet two-thirds of those with arthritis are under the age of 65, and 300,000 of them are children with juvenile arthritis (JA).  (JA itself has several subtypes, including polyarticular onset JA and systemic onset JA.)

Some of the Commonly Reported Symptoms in the PatientsLikeMe Osteoarthritis (OA) Community

At PatientsLikeMe, our rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) communities confirm that these two common forms of arthritis can affect people of all ages.  For our 2,737 patients with RA, the most common age bracket is age 40-49.  And amongst our 1,900 patients with OA, the 50-59 age bracket is the largest.  Another key takeaway is that women are disproportionately affected (92% women vs. 8% men for our RA community, and 90% women vs. 10% men for our OA community).

Have you been diagnosed with a form of arthritis?  Got questions for others like you?  Chat with the 19,000+ members of our Muscles, Bones & Joints Room today.