2 posts tagged “PTSD Awareness”

Meet Christopher – “PTSD is not just soldiers whining and complaining about struggles in life”

Posted February 15th, 2017 by

Say hello to Christopher (ChrisBC), a father, musician and Purple Heart recipient living with PTSD and bipolar disorder. We recently caught up with him to hear about how PTSD affected his marriage and how his diagnosis pushed him get the help he needed and connect with his feelings.

Keep reading to learn how he copes with stigma and the one thing he wishes people understood about PTSD.

Can you tell us a little about yourself? What are you passionate about?  

I was born in Seattle WA, and my family moved to Alaska where I grew up. I joined the Army when I was 19 years old and went to my first assignment at Fort Polk, Louisiana. I spent the next 22 years in the Army. During my time in the Army, I was stationed in seven different locations including Germany. I had five different deployments of varying lengths with three combat, and two peacekeeping. I received a Purple Heart as well as many others in my platoon during my Iraq tour for being wounded under enemy fire. I retired in 2014 and have one daughter who is 11 years old.

I am passionate about music and I play the electric bass guitar for the church that I attend now here in NY. I have played guitar since I was 8 years old and have been playing bass guitar about 12 years. I’m also passionate about family, church community, and raising my daughter.

How has PTSD affected your life? What’s the most challenging aspect of your diagnosis?

PTSD affected my life in a big way in my marriage. It was my then wife who noticed the differences in me and encouraged me to go get help. I finally went after struggling with the symptoms and believing that I didn’t have it and I was strong enough to forget the things I had been through.  Once I knew that I had PTSD and was diagnosed, then I started getting help for even more things that I was struggling with that needed to be addressed.

The most challenging aspect of my diagnosis is being in touch with my feelings. I would tend to block out my feelings and hide them deep inside and put on a false persona because I was scared. I still struggle with this today and have so much support helping me to make it through this.

How do you cope with stigma? 

I believe there should be a law against stigmatizing those of us with PTSD and other mental illnesses. I cope with stigma by not talking about it with those that stigmatize, that don’t understand it, because they already have their views and I don’t like to confront people. I believe the stigma is a real thing and when I see it makes me angry and upset. People are going to do what they are going to do and I just don’t want to discuss issues with them when they won’t understand it. Basically, I use avoidance to deal with stigma.

What’s one thing you wish people understood about PTSD?

I wish people understood that PTSD is not just soldiers whining and complaining about struggles in life. We all have those, but when you have PTSD you are dealing with a 24 hour, 365 days a year illness that is a constant struggle.

What advice can you give others who are struggling with PTSD? What do you find most helpful?

The advice I would give others is to have a support team to help you. Find a psychiatrist, and a psychologist, for those that don’t already have those. Those are the two most important people that will help you through those real hard times when the symptoms are overwhelming.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Keeping up awareness for PTSD

Posted June 27th, 2014 by

 

Back in the beginning of June, we posted about PTSD Awareness Month, and now, we’re keeping the awareness going strong for PTSD Awareness Day. To help put a face on PTSD, we shared a bunch of videos from AboutFace, a website produced by the National Center for PTSD that’s all about telling real stories of veterans living with the condition. To get a different perspective, we also thought we’d share a few of their video interviews with clinicians. Here are some to check out…

 

Stephanie Dove
Social worker

My advice to you- “I meet a lot of veterans who don’t want to come to the VA for treatment … because they’re afraid of the stigma. PTSD is a normal, understandable reaction to the experiences that many veterans have been through…”

Dr. Ron Acierno
Clinical Psychologist

How to know you’re ready for help- “Well, if you wait, you’re never going to be ready. Getting ready for treatment is like ‘how do I know I’m ready to get in better shape?’ If you’re feeling pain, you’re ready for treatment.”

Dr. Sonya Norman
Clinical Psychologist

What treatment can do for you- “Feeling better can mean so many different things to different people. For some people enjoying their marriage again, enjoying their family …. it could ‘I’m just enjoying life again.’”

And just this month, One Mind and PatientsLikeMe announced a new multi-year collaboration to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress (PTS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both. The two organizations will work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research. Check out full the collaboration announcement.

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for PTSD Awareness Day.