5 posts tagged “PROs”

RWJF Awards Grant to PatientsLikeMe to Develop New Measures for Healthcare Performance

Posted December 8th, 2015 by

Patient Network to Work with the National Quality Forum to Ensure Patients Drive Healthcare Value  

CAMBRIDGE, MA., December 8, 2015PatientsLikeMe has been awarded a $900,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to help jumpstart changes that will amplify the patient voice in the measurement of healthcare performance.

A portion of the grant funds a collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and the National Quality Forum (NQF) to develop, test and facilitate the broader use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess patient-reported health status. While PROMs have been used in clinical research, they are rarely used in routine clinical care to assess provider performance. In such settings, performance is primarily assessed by what was done to the patient (using process measures) and what happened to the patient (using clinical outcome measures), but not always by what may be most important to the patient.

The grant comes as value-based purchasing is gaining ground in both the public and private sectors, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) setting aggressive targets for linking performance related to quality, value and patient-centered care to payment. “Measuring what is relevant, useful and actionable for patients has never been more important,” said PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and President Ben Heywood. “This initiative will help quantify the patient experience at the clinical level, so that real patient outcomes can start to prompt changes in behavior, help tailor care, and improve reimbursement. With it, we’ll start to move the whole system toward more patient-centered care.”

NQF is a not-for-profit, nonpartisan, multi-stakeholder, membership-based organization that works to help advance improvements in healthcare. It evaluates, endorses, and selects measures of quality, safety and cost for accountability. The collaboration with PatientsLikeMe is one of several that are part of NQF’s new Measure Incubator, an innovative effort that holds the potential to facilitate measure development and testing more efficiently through collaboration and partnership.

NQF’s Chief Scientific Officer, Helen Burstin, MD, MPH, sees the collaboration with PatientsLikeMe as the answer to an urgent need for new measures that can improve health and healthcare outcomes.

We have an abundance of clinical measures, but we need to better incorporate the voice of the patient into performance measurement,” said Dr. Burstin. “We must be able to accurately measure and understand the patient’s day-to-day experience living with pain and fatigue as well as how they are functioning with routine activities to get the full picture. PatientsLikeMe’s inherent focus on patients will move us closer to having the patient voice be the driver and definer of health care value.”

Creating measures that matter to patients became easier in 2013 when RWJF gave PatientsLikeMe a grant to create the Open Research Exchange (ORE), an open-participation platform that allows researchers to connect with PatientsLikeMe’s 380,000 members to create, test and validate new measures. The collaboration with NQF will initially use the ORE platform to ask patients to prioritize measures, then PatientsLikeMe will develop and test them. This process will ensure that when implemented in clinical care settings, the measures broadly show a patient population’s progress and reflect health outcomes that are important to patients that can then be used to assess an organization’s performance and ultimately to determine reimbursement.

About Patient-Reported Outcomes Tools & Performance Measures

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are defined as any report of the status of a patient’s (or person’s) health condition, health behavior, or experience with healthcare that comes directly from the patient, without interpretation of the patient’s response by a clinician or anyone else. Various tools such as questionnaires, scales, or single-item measures that enable researchers, administrators, clinicians and others to assess patient-reported health status for physical, mental, and social well-being are referred to as PRO measures (PROMs). PROMs have been commonly used in clinical research because they are based on patient input, and can help ensure that the treatments developed actually help people feel better and improve symptoms or function. Their application in the clinical care setting is limited, but growing interest among various stakeholders is moving PROMs into more routine use for performance measurement. An example of this is the widely used Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) that screens and monitors the severity of depression. In a clinical setting, PROMs can help monitor patient progress over time at the individual and population level and support shared decision making. A PRO performance measure (PRO-PM) is based on aggregated patient-reported data and is used to assess quality of care for accountable entities, such as hospitals, physician practices or accountable care organizations (ACOs). NQF endorses PRO-PMs for purposes of performance improvement and accountability.

Contact
PatientsLikeMe
Katherine Bragg
kbragg@patientslikeme.com
617.548.1375


PatientsLikeMe Names 2015-2016 Team of Advisors, Sets Focus on Redefining Patient Partnerships

Posted October 19th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, October 19, 2015—PatientsLikeMe has named 14 members to its patient-only 20152016 Team of Advisors and challenged them to work through an issue that’s central to everyone in the healthcare system: how to redefine patient partnerships. The team will be focused on rethinking what it means for patients to be partners, and on establishing new ways for the healthcare industry to connect with patients to deliver better care.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said that in an era when patients must be front and center in healthcare discovery and development, the group’s mission is vital to every patient, pharmaceutical company, regulator, payor and provider. “This advisory team includes some of the strongest patient advocates we have ever met. Their experience can empower other patients, and help those serving patients understand what it means to be a good partner. The team’s work will help create a stronger foundation for a more equal and participatory system of care.

More than 1,400 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. The nearly equal mix of men and women are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), bipolar II, cancer, Type 1 diabetes, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lupus, major depressive disorder (MDD), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and post traumatic stress (PTS). Members named to the team include: Christel Aprigliano, Craig Braquet, Jeff Demers, Cyrena Gawuga, David Gewirtz, Phyllis Marchand, John Michael, Gus Prieto, Laura Roix, Patti Sanner, Allison Silensky, Angela Stogner, Doug Thornburg and Peggy Zuckerman.

Christel Aprigliano is living with Type 1 diabetes and believes that the key to a good partnership is a focused, data-driven discussion on what matters most to patients. “Patient reported outcomes are crucial to the healthcare conversation. The more information we can share about what life is like for patients every day, the more questions we can ask each other, and the better we can help patients live well with the disease they have.”

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently kicked off their 12-month collaboration with PatientsLikeMe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and will convene several times in the coming months. This is the second Team of Advisors the company has formed. Last year, the inaugural group provided feedback to the research team and published a best practices guide that outlines new standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage patients throughout the research process.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


The “Immense Benefits” of Online Health Reporting: An Interview with ALS Study Author Dr. Thomas Meyer

Posted April 27th, 2012 by

Earlier this month, we told you about a new study showing that ALS patients reporting their health status over the Internet (using a rating scale known as the ALSFRS-R) is just as reliable as a trained nurse rating the patient’s score.   Now, we’d like to share our interview with lead study author Dr. Thomas Meyer, a neurologist at Charité University Hospital in Berlin, Germany.  What role did PatientsLikeMe play in this research?  And what are the study’s implications for the future of clinical trials?  Find out that and more in our interview with Dr. Meyer below.

Dr. Thomas Meyer, Neurologist at Charite University Hospital in Berlin

1.  When did you become interested in patient-reported outcomes?

In 2005, we first used tablet PCs in our outpatient department to capture patient-reported outcomes (PROs). To us neurologists, PROs play a crucial role. Many neurological conditions can be captured by means of PROs only – I am thinking of pain in neuropathies, spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS), the subjective perception of movement ability in Parkinson’s syndrome and dyspnoea (breathing difficulty) in neuromuscular conditions, including ALS. Given this fact, we neurologists have always listened to our patients a little more carefully so that we can do a good job. Therefore, the systematic capturing of PROs is a natural process to us, and we are most happy to be able to support any advancement and positive development thereof.

2.  Your study showed remarkable agreement between the two ALSFRS-R reporting methods.  Were you surprised that they were so similar?

You are absolutely correct. Correlation here looks like a textbook example of medical statistics. We were indeed very surprised to find that the data were so unequivocal.  Notwithstanding, our previous experience with the offline electronic capturing of ALSFRS-R had taught us that the data captured in a personal interview are very close to those captured in computer-based self-assessments.

A Chart Showing the Striking Similarity Between ALSFRS-R Scores as Reported by ALS Patients (Bottom Axis) and Their Clinicians (Left Axis)

Then we took the next step and progressed from offline to online assessment. Other work groups had already shown good correlation between the face-to-face capturing of the score on the one hand, and data capturing over the phone on the other. That was very useful upfront information for us. Insofar, the success of our study didn’t come as a complete surprise to us.

3.  How did Dr. Paul Wicks, PatientsLikeMe’s Director of Research & Development, contribute to this research project?

Our great interest in the issue of PROs in ALS goes back a long time. Nevertheless, we were very much aware of the fact that PatientsLikeMe is by far the most experienced organization with regard to PROs worldwide and also the one that identifies with this topic most. So, a small group of four of us flew from Berlin to Boston to introduce our clinical trial to PatientsLikeMe and to learn from their experience. Once we had concluded the study, we flew to Boston once again to see Paul and to prepare the paper. We profited immensely from Paul’s input, and he gave the manuscript a superordinate perspective.

PatientsLikeMe Research & Development Director Paul Wicks, PhD

So it is for a good reason that he is listed as co-author of this publication. Overall, this scientific research project was a collaboration between the Charité University Hospital and PatientsLikeMe. I believe it is also an important, gratifying and affirming experience for PatientsLikeMe to see that in terms of methodology the online capturing of PROs is at least equal to an interview conducted face-to-face. I can even imagine situations where the online mode of capturing PROs is actually better than a personal interview, especially where rather complicated and very private issues are addressed. This is just one of the many points we discussed vividly with Paul.

4.  Do you believe online patient reporting will become an acceptable practice for clinical trials?  What are the ramifications if it does?

I can very well imagine that the online capturing of PROs will one day become an integral part of clinical trials. It is quite an obvious thing; however, owing to regulatory requirements, it will be quite some time before it will actually be possible to implement this. The bottom line is that clinical trials will have to be conducted for each score demonstrating equivalence between paper-based and web-based capturing. Not all of the scores have actually been evaluated for online capturing. Another critical point surely is Internet access.

Having said that, it certainly also depends on the patient group and the actual medical condition under examination. I suppose that from a medical-ethical point of view it is problematic to exclude patients from a trial simply because they are unable to realize an online completion of the score. In this regard, I believe the first step to be taken must be to demonstrate equivalence between online and offline capturing of the score. Then one could give patients the option of using online assessment in the context of participating in a clinical trial and see what they would prefer to do.

The benefits would be immense. This method could highly enhance the quality of the data, the efficiency of data capturing and, not least of all, it would help reduce the costs of a clinical trial. I believe that online assessment will be a matter of course in the future, but not immediately.


Manage your epilepsy like a PRO

Posted February 11th, 2010 by

Ever wonder how epilepsy affects the patient — the whole patient? A patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a questionnaire commonly used in the clinical world to asses a patient’s quality of life (QOL) for research studies. Most of the time patients never get to see their test results, much less see them plotted over time. That’s a shame because many of the best PROs were designed with the help of patients talking about their condition in their own voice.

Patients in our epilepsy community can now access a series of PROs to help understand the effect of their disease on everyday life and have a voice in real-world, real-time research. The best part is that once they’ve completed the questionnaires (which should take about 20 minutes) they get to see summary findings of how they compare to other members in the community, plus a summary of their overall physical, mental, and social quality of life is displayed on their profile and their patient icon.

This is an ambitious project; we’re looking to get data from thousands of patients with epilepsy at 3 distinct time points. Through this shared goal for the community, patients are pulling together and encouraging one another to have a voice in research.  After all, the more data is in the system, the more insight every individual can gain from taking part!

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks


An Interview with UCB’s Peter Verdru

Posted July 13th, 2009 by

Last month, PatientsLikeMe announced our partnership with biopharma leader, UCB, to launch a new community for people with epilepsy.  Below is an interview with UCB’s Vice President of Clinical Research, Peter Verdru, MD.  David S. Williams III, head of PatientsLikeMe business development, recently spoke with Peter about the forthcoming epilepsy community, adverse event reporting, and the partnership in general.

***

581
(David) UCB is known as The Epilepsy Company.  What’s your goal in partnering with PatientsLikeMe to create a new community for people with epilepsy?
pvh-1-3
(Peter) As patient-centric companies, UCB and PatientsLikeMe are both committed to advancing research and improving the lives of people with life-changing conditions.  UCB has a long-term commitment to the epilepsy community – so a partnership with an organization like PatientsLikeMe seemed only natural.

Our goal with this partnership is to provide this community to patients with epilepsy to help them manage their disease. Additionally, the community will generate patient-reported outcomes that may help UCB better understand how patients live with epilepsy and help advance epilepsy care. We anticipate patient-reported outcomes data across treatment groups for seizure severity, number of seizures, symptoms, adverse events, health-related quality of life, and co-morbidities, among other things. Using this knowledge for our future clinical research programs would be a logical next step, leading to an even better understanding of what future treatments could offer or what type of patients would gain additional benefit.

581 (David) This partnership is said to give patients a voice in advancing research.  How so?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) This community will give patients the tools they need to measure their own outcomes. Participants will record their real-time, day-to-day progress in controlling their seizures and achieving their treatment goals, and share that with the community to help other patients, caregivers, researchers and industry learn more about the disease. Tracking their disease over the long-term may help patients and physicians work together to evaluate the impact of their treatment. Eventually, clinical research programs might also benefit from the long-term data these patients are sharing.
581 (David) Through the partnership, both companies will be working to design and deploy a system that allows for adverse event reporting to the FDA.  Why?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) UCB has an ethical and legal responsibility to report adverse events associated with our drugs. If adverse events for any UCB drugs are mentioned on the site, UCB is required to report these directly to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Therefore, we are working to develop and deploy a solution that will allow us to assess and process potential adverse events, report them to the FDA, and capture them in the UCB safety database.
581 (David) What’s the most exciting part of this initiative for UCB?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) We’re excited to be taking a leadership role in the pharmaceutical industry to create a community that will give patients a forum for showing their treatment outcomes. Patients are really the experts about how epilepsy impacts their lives.

UCB is focused on bringing new treatments to patients with severe diseases like epilepsy. We sincerely believe this unique partnership will bring real value to the large community of patients, families and caregivers

581 (David) Thanks Peter!