1 posts tagged “powerlifting”

Member Chris finds the uplifting side of type 1 diabetes

Posted February 23rd, 2017 by

“I am the only 7-fingered diabetic record-holding powerlifter and motivational speaker you know!” Chris (ChrisRuden) says in his profile. He was born with two fingers on his left hand and a shorter left arm. He was bullied in high school, and he struggled with depression, alcohol and drug use.

Chris was diagnosed with diabetes at age 20, when he was in college studying law. His diagnosis inspired him to shift his focus to health and wellness (personally and professionally), and he earned a degree in Exercise Science and Health Promotion from Florida Atlantic University. He runs an online nutrition and fitness coaching business and he published an e-book called The Art of Losing Body Fat. He holds four state records in powerlifting (with one hand)! He is also a motivational speaker who has given talks at schools, businesses and organizations like the American Diabetes Association across the U.S.

We recently caught up with Chris about his interests, overcoming adversity and the upshot of his diabetes diagnosis.

What are your three favorite things to do? What do you love about them?

I love powerlifting, speaking and helping people get in shape! Powerlifting allows me to compete against myself and push my limits. Learning to lift properly as an amputee and learning to stabilize my blood sugar while lifting with diabetes was tough. But I love the challenge and satisfaction of working towards a goal and achieving it – no matter how long it takes. Speaking is my passion because I get to share stories that help people overcome hardships in their lives. Speaking allows me to be honest and real with the audience. There is nothing better than people writing me months after a talk or seminar about how they are still motivated and fueled by my talk. Helping people get in shape online is my business, but it is also my passion. I know what it is like not to be confident in your body, and I get the chance to help people with that mental and physical struggle daily.

How did growing up “being different,” as you say in your profile, shape your life? Has it helped you adjust to life with diabetes?

I was bullied and picked on for being different. I tried to stay strong as much as possible but it was hard and depression did get to me. It took a while to figure out that other kids or teens who would make fun of me for something I can’t control probably have a lot of personal issues they are dealing with. I focused on doing the best I could with what I had, and that philosophy carried over into my diabetes management. I was mentally prepared to handle the burden of diabetes because I knew it took the right mindset to thrive.

Could you share your diabetes diagnosis story with us? Why do you consider your diagnosis “the best thing to ever happen” to you? 

I was actually working in the ER at the time I was diagnosed. Weeks prior, I had been going to the bathroom 20+ times a day and I was so thirsty and irritable. My mom worked for a urologist in the same building so we did a urine test just in case, and I was admitted to the hospital with a blood sugar of 510. If it weren’t for diabetes, I would’ve never switched my major from law to exercise science, I wouldn’t be working with other type 1’s in the community, and I wouldn’t have found my true calling in life.

It seems like defying limits is a big theme in your life. What are some limitations that you’ve shattered? What motivates or inspires you to live this way?

Limits are problems and all problems have solutions. I have broken a few state records in powerlifting, deadlifting over 600lbs when the original limit was thought to be: “I can’t deadlift because I’m missing a hand.” Playing drums by sticking a drumstick through a glove finger hole was another limit. I also shoot guns, go fishing and occasionally rock climb. Some might see that as overcoming limits; in my case I just call it living.

What advice do you have for someone dealing with multiple health issues or going through a rough patch with their health?

Keep going. Think logically on what you can do on your part. Do the best you can with what you have where you are right now. By focusing on what you can control and not what you can’t control, life becomes a little more clear.

As a new member, what’s your experience on PatientsLikeMe been like so far, and what are you most interested in learning more about going forward?

I love the community and I’m really interested in just learning about other peoples’ perspectives and how they manage daily. I love to see people succeeding, regardless of how big the success or how hard the obstacle.

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