10 posts tagged “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”

Lady Gaga reveals her struggle with PTSD

Posted March 3rd, 2017 by
Lady Gaga PTSD

LADY GAGA / TWITTER

Musician Lady Gaga recently revealed in an open letter that she is living with PTSD. In the letter, posted to the Born This Way Foundation website, she discussed her struggle with the condition since being sexually assaulted as a teenager: “I have wrestled for some time about when, how and if I should reveal my diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). After five years of searching for the answers to my chronic pain and the change I have felt in my brain, I am finally well enough to tell you.”

In the letter, Gaga touched on living with and managing the symptoms of the condition, and that she experiences something called dissociation, which can present itself in a range of experiences – she opened up about how it impacted her: “…my mind doesn’t want to relive the pain so ‘I look off and I stare’ in a glazed over state… My body is in one place and my mind in another. It’s like the panic accelerator in my mind gets stuck and I am paralyzed with fear,” she wrote. “When this happens I can’t talk. When this happens repeatedly, it makes me have a common PTSD reaction which is that I feel depressed and unable to function like I used to.” Gaga also revealed she tends to experience somatization, which means she experiences physical pain related to her mental state.

Along with fighting against the stigma associated with mental illness, Lady Gaga also hopes to raise awareness for all people living with PTSD, including those outside of the military: “Traditionally, many associate PTSD as a condition faced by brave men and women that serve countries all over the world,” she wrote. “While this is true, I seek to raise awareness that this mental illness affects all kinds of people, including our youth. I pledge not only to help our youth not feel ashamed of their own conditions, but also to lend support to those servicemen and women who suffer from PTSD. No one’s invisible pain should go unnoticed.”

The news made headlines globally and the musician pledged to continue to share her experiences and manage the condition as best she can. “I will never give up on my dreams of art and music. I am continuing to learn how to transcend this because I know I can. If you relate to what I am sharing, please know that you can too.”

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


“I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress” – An interview with PTS and TBI member Trevor

Posted October 14th, 2015 by

Trevor Martin, a Veteran of the United States Army was deployed to Afghanistan twice from 2009 to 2012 and was later diagnosed with both a mild TBI and PTS. He joined PatientsLikeMe to connect with others living from these conditions. Our friends over at PatientsLikeMe sat down with Trevor to learn more about his life with PTS and TBI. Here’s what we learned….

Some people talk about PTSD ‘triggers.’  Do you know your triggers, or do symptoms happen unexpectedly?

I know some of my triggers, like trash on the side of the road. In Afghanistan they would put IEDs under piles of trash to hide them on the side of the road. So I know if I see that today, my heart starts to race, I get hyper-vigilant, and I start to think something’s about to happen that I need to avoid.

You mentioned that you feel a lot of pressure to be who you were before the war.  How are you different since returning home? 

I used to be the fun guy. All my friends would come to me and we’d go out and go shooting and joke around. It’s hard now because a lot of my friends don’t really understand. They don’t really know what I’ve gone through and what I’ve seen because it’s hard to talk about. The friends that I have told don’t really believe it.

What has it been like connecting with other vets on PatientsLikeMe?  

There are things you’ve done or seen that you will never forget. I don’t want anyone to ever imagine the things I see when I close my eyes at night. I wouldn’t wish that on anyone. It takes a lot for me to come out and talk about it. It’s been easier to connect with people online instead of in person. If I hadn’t found the site, I honestly don’t think I’d be here right now.

I haven’t been on this site for very long but man, I’m glad I found it. Since telling my story in a forum called “PTSD, my story and a cry for help” a couple months ago and reading all of your stories, I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress within myself. I’ve only had maybe 5 “freak outs” since joining. Whereas I was having 5 a day before. Half of the battle is knowing that you’re not alone in this, we’ve all done and seen different things but in reality, we’re all the same.

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The Patient Voice- PTS member David shares his story

Posted June 27th, 2015 by

Today is PTS Awareness Day, so we wanted you to meet PatientsLikeMe community member Cpl. David Jurado, who lives with post-traumatic stress (PTS). David developed PTS while serving in the military. After he retired, he continued to deal with daily symptoms, and he encourages members to connect with others on PatientsLikeMe, because “if you want to make changes for yourself and the PTS community, you’ve got to share your story. The same thing may be happening to them.”

David is not alone – and neither are you. There are more than 1,000 vets living with PTS that are part of the community. We’ve heard members like David talk about how important it is for them to connect with people who ‘get it.’

Not a veteran living with PTS? You’re not alone either. With more than 8,000 PTS members, it’s easy for anyone with PTS to share their story and get support.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for PTS.


One Mind and PatientsLikeMe join forces to help people with post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury

Posted June 12th, 2014 by

Collaboration Will Uncover Real-World Experiences, Generate Patient Data That Improves Daily Living and Overall Understanding of Conditions

SEATTLE, WA—June 12, 2014—One Mind and PatientsLikeMe announced a new multi-year collaboration to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress (PTS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both. The two organizations will work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research.

Building on the headway One Mind has made in seeking out real solutions for patients, One Mind CEO, General Pete Chiarelli, U.S. Army (Retired), said the collaboration will address longstanding issues for people with all forms of PTS and TBI. “You only have to look at the way we diagnose and treat people to know that we’re decades behind in our understanding of these conditions. We have an amazing ability to save soldiers on the battlefield, but we don’t do a good job addressing their invisible wounds. And we prescribe a mix of off-label drugs because nothing has been developed specifically for their condition. We need to look to the future to improve outcomes and lives, and this innovative partnership will do just that.”

Almost 8 percent of adult Americans will experience PTS (including the disorder known as PTSD) at some point in their lives, according to R.C. Kessler’s findings from The National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) Report. In addition to veterans, victims of sexual assault and others who have experienced a traumatic event may develop PTS. TBI is broadly defined as an alteration in brain function or pathology caused by an external force that can occur at home, at work, during sports activities, or on the battlefield. In 2009, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that there were at least 2.4 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or deaths related to TBI across the country, and that the leading causes of TBI are accidents, sport-related injuries or other incidents.

“We are both of one mind when it comes to the challenges of living with and researching these understudied and largely misunderstood conditions,” said PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood. “Our partnership with One Mind and the individuals dealing with PTS and TBI will provide insights about effective treatments from people in the real world, and drive new understanding about gaps in care. It will also provide a new resource where people are empowered to help themselves as they learn how to live better with their condition.”

One Mind is also supporting multi-center clinical studies called TRACK-TBI and CENTER-TBI, which will follow thousands of TBI patients over three years. Both studies enroll patients within 24 hours of their injury and are focused on improving treatments through developing new diagnostics tools such as imaging protocols and biomarkers. Heywood added that in the future, the patient-reported data from the TBI community on PatientsLikeMe may be combined with the TRACK-TBI and Center-TBI data, as well as other studies, to create a rich and unprecedented set of information about people’s real-world experiences.

One Mind and PatientsLikeMe are actively seeking nonprofit and other partners to grow the online community and learn together about people’s real-world experiences. People living with any form of PTS or TBI can join fellow members of the PatientsLikeMe community today to become early users of the site and provide feedback on future customizations for the community. Go to www.patientslikeme.com for further information.

About One Mind
One Mind is an independent, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to benefiting all affected by brain illness and injury through fostering fundamental changes that will radically accelerate the development and implementation of improved diagnostics, treatments, and cures; while eliminating the stigma. One Mind believes in open science principles and creates global public-private partnerships between governmental, corporate, scientific, and philanthropic communities. Visit us at www.1mind4research.org or follow us via Twitter or Facebook.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 250,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 50 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

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CONTACTS

ONE MIND                                                              
Brooke Whitney
Office: +1 206.946.1768
brooke.whitney@1mind4research.org           

PatientsLikeMe
Margot Carlson Delogne
Mobile: +1 781.492.1039
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com


“I know that it will pass eventually” – PatientsLikeMe member Jennifer shares about her PTSD

Posted June 6th, 2014 by

June is National Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month, and recently, Jennifer (aka sortaborderline) spoke about her personal experiences with the neurological condition. She talked all about learning to roll with her triggers, leaning on her family and PatientsLikeMe members for support, and recognizing the relationship between her fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) and PTSD. Check out her full interview below.

 

What went through your mind when you were first diagnosed with PTSD?

I already thought that PTSD was the problem, but it was such a relief to know that I wasn’t “losing my mind.” I have a legitimate disorder, not something that I can wish away or just “try harder” to ignore or push through. I actually felt empowered. Now I knew for sure what was going on, so I could work on treating it. Putting a name to the disorder really helped take a lot of the fear out of it for me. When I am triggered, I know why and I know that it will pass eventually. Just that little bit of information gives me so much more power over it as opposed to before when I didn’t know what was happening.

What have you learned about living with PTSD in the years following your diagnosis?

For the most part, I have learned to roll with it. Not that it is easy or that learning that hasn’t been difficult. I have learned that it is okay to share with my support system when I am triggered and ask for help getting myself back to center. I have learned that it is okay to share how I am feeling with my husband. That was a big step for me. Not because he hasn’t always been supportive of me, he has. Because of my particular issues, it is difficult for me to trust people with my unfiltered self. I’ve learned that I can with him, and it has helped strengthen my marriage immeasurably. People on the Mental Health board at PatientsLikeMe have been incredibly helpful and supportive of me and I know that no matter how bad it gets, I can pour it out on the page in my journal and be supported. For one thing, it can be cathartic to get it all out on the page. For another, it helps me to get feedback. Sometimes all it takes is someone reminding you of the coping skills I have to help me get my bearings.

In addition to PTSD, you’re also living with fibromyalgia and ME/CFS – do you notice a relationship between your conditions? How does one impact the other?

My diagnoses are essentially intertwined. One can trigger the other. If someone is having a long or particularly painful ME/CFS flare, that can make a neuro-typical person anxious. For a person with an anxiety disorder, that is amplified. The pain from the ME/CFS is exhausting. All of those pain signals bombard your brain for days on end, and your brain gets tired. It makes it difficult to think, resulting in the bane of the CFS/ME sufferers’ existence, the dreaded fibro-fog. It is very difficult and emotionally draining, not to mention the effect it has on your sleep. It is difficult to use learned coping skills when you’re exhausted.

On the flip side, anyone with an anxiety disorder can tell you that there are physical symptoms when you’re triggered. With ME/CFS, that is amplified as well and can trigger a flare. Which can amplify the anxiety trigger. It can be viciously cyclical. Sometimes, I just have to rest. There is nothing else to be done. Rest, a good diet, and hydration are the best thing to break it sometimes. If anything, I have learned to pay attention to subtle changes in my body or mood so that I can try to mitigate flares and triggers whenever I can.

You mention a “normal” mask on your PatientsLikeMe profile – can you share what means for you?

I am a mother of two children, I am a wife, a daughter, an aunt, and a granddaughter. I am trying to build a career and lead a full life. People depend on me. I have to “fake it until I make it” a lot of the time. It is difficult. It is nice to be able to take off that mask and be frank about what I am dealing with in the safety of the PatientsLikeMe Mental Health forum. I truly believe the help and camaraderie that I have found there has helped me to maintain a stability that I didn’t have before I found it. I feel much less alone in my struggle, even when in mid-episode, and as much as my “in person” support system is helpful, sometimes you just need to talk to someone who has been where you are. It is indispensable.

How have the connections you’ve made with others in the PatientsLikeMe community helped you to take that mask off?

I am not afraid of my symptoms anymore. I am not afraid to let my feelings out a bit more. I am not afraid to reach out and ask for help, nor am I afraid to offer help to others. Even a little note of support can help pull someone back on the path they want to be on. People on the forum have done it for me so many times. Having a cheering section helps you get the strength together to keep fighting. I know that, and I offer as much support as I can to other members because it matters. I feel like I matter. Even when my symptoms are at their worst and I feel weak and small, I know that a note of support to someone else matters. Sometimes when you can’t bring yourself to matter to yourself, mattering to others can keep you going until you can.

What advice would you give to someone who has just been diagnosed with PTSD?

Don’t be afraid. Don’t let negative stigma regarding mental illness keep you from getting help. Our disorders are just as valid as physical illnesses. They need treatment in order for us to function and live our lives. Therapy was absolutely essential to getting me stabilized. It truly helped me to manage my disorders and start living again. If you don’t “click” with the first therapist, try another. When you find the right fit and do some hard work, it will make a huge difference for you.

I have found the tracking tools on PatientsLikeMe to be immensely helpful, especially in the beginning, for tracking symptoms to see if there are patterns in my triggers and symptoms, which has helped direct my therapy and coping techniques. The medication tracker has been helpful as I am one of those super fortunate folks who seem to have a proclivity toward weird side effects from medications. That way I can remember what we have tried and how it worked. Visit the forum. Check out my journal if you want, it’s public. There are folks who have just hung out and read the forum for months before joining in, and that is okay. It helps to see that others think like you and understand what you’re dealing with.

Most importantly, don’t give up. It can get better.


Patients as Partners: The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale questionnaire results

Posted April 18th, 2014 by

Back at the beginning of April, we launched a new blog series called Patients as Partners that highlights the results and feedback PatientsLikeMe members give to questionnaires on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. This time around, we’re sharing the results of the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS), a health measure that looks at how confident people are in managing their own conditions. More than 1,500 members from 9 different condition communities on PatientsLikeMe took part. They worked with our research partner Ken Wallston from Vanderbilt University to make the tool the best it can be. (Thank you to everyone that participated! This is your data doing good.) Check out the PMCSMS results and keep your eyes peeled for more ORE questionnaire results as we continue the series on the blog.

What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.


“Take the step.” Raising awareness for post traumatic stress disorder

Posted June 4th, 2013 by

June is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month and the US Department of Veterans Affairs is helping to raise awareness of the condition. About 60% of men and 50% of women will go through at least one traumatic event in their life, and 5.2 million adults will experience PTSD during any given year.[1]

PTSD

Here are just a few useful tools to check out…

If you’re living with PTSD, find others just like you in our growing community of more than 5,000 PTSD patients on PatientsLikeMe. Learn what they’re doing to manage their condition with symptom and treatment reports, and share your own experience with a personal health profile or in the community forums.



[1] http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/how-common-is-ptsd.asp


Mental Illness Awareness Week 2012: Dismantling the Stigma

Posted October 11th, 2012 by

Did you know that one in four adults – or approximately 57.7 million Americans – experiences a mental health problem in any given year?  Or that one in 17 lives with a serious, chronic mental illness?

It's Mental Illness Awareness Week

Since 1990, National Mental Illness Awareness Week has been recognized by the U.S. Congress as a time for mental health advocates and patients to join together for various awareness-raising activities. Sponsored by National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), the goal of this week is to transform the way we think about mental illness, which is defined by NAMI as “a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning.”

Important Phone Numbers to Have on Hand in the Event of Mental Health Crisis

Like any other medical condition affecting a particular organ, mental illness is not caused by personal weakness or character defects, and it can affect individuals of any age, race, religion or income.  As an example, some famous people who are known to have lived with mental illness include Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill, Gandhi, Tennessee Williams and Mike Wallace (who was eulogized by one of our members last June).  Below is a new PSA ad for National Mental Illness Awareness Week 2012 that focuses on some of these legendary icons, stressing that “you are not alone in this fight.”

But what about feeling like no one understands what you’re going through?  That’s where finding others like you – such as those with the same diagnosis (or diagnoses), symptoms or treatment side effects – comes in.  At PatientsLikeMe, we have tens of thousands of patients sharing their experiences with more than 60 mental health conditions, including:

In addition to exchanging in-depth treatment evaluations about the effectiveness and side effects of commonly prescribed medications such as Cymbalta, Klonopin or Wellbutrin, our members are connecting and supporting each other daily in our Mental Health and Behavior Forum.  Currently, there are more than 39,000 participants and more than 333,000 posts in this highly active forum, where you can find answers, empathy, humor and thought-provoking conversations day or night.

Get to know our mental health community – including what depression feels like to them or how PatientsLikeMe has helped them be more open about their condition – today.  Also, stay tuned for some tips from our community about what to do and not do when interacting with someone who is living with a mental health condition.


Add Your Voice During National Recovery Month

Posted September 10th, 2012 by

National Recovery Month Takes Places Every September

Are you in recovery from an addiction or mental health disorder – or do you know someone who is?  The theme for National Recovery Month 2012, sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), is “Join the Voices for Recovery: It’s Worth It!”

There are several different ways to participate in this annual event, which promotes the societal benefits of prevention and treatment for mental and substance use disorders:

Now in its 23rd year, National Recovery Month was founded on the belief that we should celebrate the gains made by those in recovery, just as we would with those who are managing other health conditions.  The goal is to spread the positive message you can live a healthy and rewarding life with the aid of treatment and mental health services.

Are you looking to start on the road to recovery?  Reclaim your life by calling SAMHSA’s National Helpline (1-800-662-HELP), where you can be assisted in both English and Spanish.  If you’re already in recovery, find solidarity and support by connecting with others like you at PatientsLikeMe.  We have thousands of patients sharing their experiences with numerous disorders, including:

Exchange stories and tips – as well as in-depth treatment evaluations – with those who can truly relate today.


The Patient Voice – Loud and Clear

Posted September 1st, 2009 by

We are excited to present the first member video for the PatientsLikeMe Mood community and what better way to kick it off than with one that represents the voice of the patient.

In June, we launched The Patient Voice with the inaugural report on inpatient therapy, a topic often discussed by our Mood community members.  At the time of the report, 63% of patients on our site reported an efficacy of “moderate” or “major” for inpatient therapy.

Many patients have already benefited from the information in the report, so we decided to create a video that highlights our patient members’ tips and experiences. Check it out on our YouTube or Facebook page, but if you visit the latter don’t forget to become our fan!

If you want to know more about patients’ experiences with inpatient therapy, you can download the full report here. It includes even more tips and personal stories, interesting facts about the PatientsLikeMe community and a worksheet that will help you make the most out of your hospital stay. Of course, none of this would have been possible if patients like you were not willing to share. We are always eager to hear what you have to say, so please share on.

Once again, special thanks to our summer intern, Shane, for his work on the video!