3 posts tagged “PLS”

Rare Disease Day 2011: “Rare, But Equal”

Posted February 28th, 2011 by

RDD_whiteFor patients with prevalent diseases, it may be easy to find others with your condition.  You meet them at clinics; you run into them when seeing your specialist; or you participate in one of the support groups in your area.  For those with rare diseases, the simple act of finding another patient like you isn’t always as easy.  You might be the only patient your doctor has seen with your condition.  Finding another patient often becomes a goal and sharing and learning from them a welcomed reward.

Alongside NORD and EURORDIS, we are celebrating Rare Disease Day and they’ve deemed this year’s theme “Rare, but Equal.”  At PatientsLikeMe, patients are patients, no matter what their condition.  Patients with rare diseases are sharing their health information alongside patients with more widespread conditions.

So, who do we have sharing information about their rare disease?  To date, more than 455 patients with Multiple System Atrophy and 122 patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, both neurodegenerative disorders that mimic Parkinson’s disease, have joined our community.  Do you have Neuromyelitis Optica, the autoimmune inflammatory disorder affecting the spinal cord, optic nerve, that has lesions often misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis?  There are 332 patients just like you.  Sharing right alongside these patients you’ll find 388 patients with Progressive Muscular Atrophy (a rare subtype of ALS which only affects the lower motor neurons) and 331 with Primary Lateral Sclerosis (a subtype of ALS which affects the upper motor neurons).

Many of you also know that we actually started PatientsLikeMe focused on the rare neurodegenerative disease, ALS.  Six years later, there are now more than 4,000 ALS patients-plus almost 20% of the newly diagnosed in the U.S. every month-sharing their journeys and learning from one another.  (You can read about highlighted milestones in our 2010 ALS Awareness Month blog.)  In 2011, we’ll continue our heritage of serving those with rare diseases by improving this overall experience of finding a “patient like me.”

There are no major awareness raising pink ribbons or yellow wristbands for these rare diseases.  But, there is a group of patients who have found each other, who are sharing with one another and the world their disease experience.  And, that will translate to accelerated research and better outcomes – two things we are hoping to make a little less rare.

PatientsLikeMe member mcotter


Charting the course of PLS and PMA

Posted August 11th, 2009 by

Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS) and Progressive Muscular Atrophy (PMA) are two rare variants of the disease ALS. Normally, ALS affects the upper motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, as well as the lower motor neurons that send signals from the spinal cord directly to muscles. PLS and PMA are different because PLS only affects the upper motor neurons, and PMA only affects the lower motor neurons. It’s an important distinction for patients to be told about because the prognosis is less severe in these conditions.  On average, survival in ALS is typically reported to be 2-5 years, whereas for patients with PMA it’s more like 5-10 years and for PLS it’s even longer (often several decades).

ALS itself is a rare condition, affecting some 30,000 people in the United States at any one time.  PLS and PMA each represent approximately 5% of the overall ALS community, so there’s approximately 1,500 patients with each condition in the U.S at any given time.  In April 2008, PatientsLikeMe added the ability for members of our ALS community to change their diagnosis to these rare conditions.  To date, we now have 182 patients with PLS and 270 with PMA. This is truly exciting because even the largest studies in the literature have only examined 40 or so PLS patients and a similar number of PMA patients. One of our most useful features on our site for people with ALS is the percentile curves, which we display as a backdrop on their profiles to put each individual’s rate of progression into context. However, as you can see in the figure below, when you compare the progression curves of ALS patients on our site with those of a typical PLS patient, the PLS patient progression deviates significantly from the ALS curves.

pls-patient-on-als-curves_ls2

With so many PLS and PMA patients sharing such valuable information about their disease on PatientsLikeMe, we had enough information to generate a new set of percentile curves for each of those communities.  To do this, we used self-report ALSFRS-R (ALS functional rating score – revised) data from 104 PLS patients and 59 PMA patients that met our criteria for data quality. We have good data for the first 4-5 years of disease after onset, and after that point we rely on linear extrapolation to make the plots.  Here we see the value of openness in action.  When you see the potential value in contributing your data, it drives a virtuous cycle: the more data you enter, the more value you get, so you enter more data!

pma_profile1

As any of our patients in these communities will tell you, being diagnosed with a rare disease can be a frustrating experience. Aside from dealing with the condition itself, there’s the lack of public awareness, a lack of research investigating your condition, and a sense that you are being “lumped in” with a similar disease because your community doesn’t have the critical mass to merit its own attention.  These new percentile curves for PLS and PMA patients demonstrate the value and power of openness.  By sharing their health data in an open fashion, patients are providing new insights that are changing how we think and act when it comes to these very rare conditions.

Note:  A potential limitation of these curves is that they represent the outcomes for patients that are members of PatientsLikeMe and may not be generalizable to the entire population; we are working hard to better understand and correct for the biases in our population and data. As the size and longevity of each community increases, we will be in a better position to address these issues.

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks PatientsLikeMe member tvaughn