17 posts tagged “PF”

Meeting PF patients where they are

Posted May 8th, 2017 by

Say hello to John (John_R), a father, grandfather and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) survivor. Sound familiar? Last year he shared his story about life after a double lung transplant and the importance of considering a lung transplant early. This year, John started a Facebook group to live-stream pulmonary fibrosis (PF) support group meetings and conferences.

“I am very passionate about honoring the precious gift provided by my donor family and in living a life worthy of their generosity.”

John received a bilateral lung transplant on January 1st, 2015, and believes he’s alive today thanks to his donor family and care team at UT Southwestern in Dallas. Now, he’s committed to raising awareness for the needs of the pulmonary fibrosis community.

Life after transplant

John’s life before transplant included the use of supplemental oxygen 24 hours a day, and what he calls, “an eminent expiration date” in his near future. He couldn’t visit family in Colorado or the higher elevations of New Mexico due to the altitude, and every breath was a struggle.

“The biggest thing about life after lung transplant is that I no longer have a firm expiration date, I can have hope. I can go to Colorado and attend medical conferences. I can help others by sharing my experiences and the knowledge I’ve gained. I have also learned to cherish the moments that make living wonderful.  A moment of kindness, shared empathy or even a smile mean so much to me now. The rest doesn’t really matter. Life is good.”

Fighting isolation with the help of Facebook

According to John, many people diagnosed with IPF have never even heard of the disease prior to hearing of it from their doctor. Then they learn that their disease has no cure and only a couple of treatments that slow the progress of fibrosis for some. Online research about IPF offers little comfort either. John’s experience motivated him to start an online support group using Facebook Live.

 

“IPF can be a very isolating disease. Your friends and family have never heard of it and you are reminded of your mortality with every breath. In my case, each trip to the pulmonologist was just proof that my disease was progressing. A support group can help with the feelings of isolation and loneliness, plus provide valuable information and hope for the future.”

 

After trying a paid platform to share their meetings, but finding it too difficult for some participants to access, John thought Facebook Live seemed a good option. Once someone has joined the group they get a notification when the support group goes live.

“They are then just one click away from being able to join the meeting and participate with folks who share the same journey.”

Though the Facebook group is new and participation is growing, John hopes that it will help people understand that they are not alone, and that he can provide some valuable information about IPF and lung transplants.

Managing with PatientsLikeMe

“I use PatientsLikeMe to track my data and as a platform to share with others in our community. I can easily view my lung function both before and after my transplant, track my weight loss and ensure I am maintaining a healthy weight, and keep an eye on A1C, cholesterol, and all my medications in one place. PatientsLikeMe has also given me the opportunity to participate in studies and share my voice with the healthcare community.
 

“The pulmonary fibrosis community on PatientsLikeMe was my anchor when I was coming to terms with my IPF diagnosis, and continues support now that I’ve had a transplant.”

 

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Patients as Partners: Member Laura on launching a PF support group

Posted June 24th, 2016 by

Laura (standing on left) at the June meeting of the New Britain PF Support Group

Over the past few months, the Team of Advisors has been sharing how they use the Partnership Principles in their personal health journeys. Laura, who’s living with IPF, recently sat down with us to talk about the New Britain PF Support Group she launched in Connecticut, and how important it is to have a community of people who know what you’re going through. Check out the Q&A below to see how she helps patients, caregivers, and their families understand that they’re not alone.

Tell us a little about the New Britain PF Support Group — who’s involved and what’s the goal?

The New Britain PF Support Group had the first meeting September 2015. The meeting is for the patient and caregiver, plus family and friends who may be interested in understanding what their loved one is going through.

The goal is to provide information on PF/IPF. Knowledge can empower the patient and caregiver to work with their doctors and professional team. Most importantly, the support group lets people know they are not alone — we are all in this together and we understand.

How did you come up with the idea of creating the group?

There was only one support group in Connecticut and it was quarterly in New Haven, about an hour away from me. I would go and get such wonderful information and talk to some really awesome people, both professionals and patients. Most of the patients were from the southern part of CT, and I felt that people in the northern part of the state would benefit from a face-to-face support group meeting. I knew from going to the meetings at Yale New Haven Hospital that I always left there feeling more empowered and emotionally stronger. I wanted other PF/IPF patients to feel the same.

Since September 2015, another group has been started further west. In attending those meetings I’ve met new patients. It’s exciting to see that we are touching more and more PF/IPF patients who didn’t have face-to-face support with others who shared the same issue.

What’s the most beneficial aspect of partnering with others who know what you’re going through?

We have quarterly meetings and while the first part is educational (information about what is going on in treatments for IPF/PF), the majority of the meeting is support. If you sat in the corner and watched, you’d notice that the patients and caregivers are like sponges. They want to get information from others who’ve “been there” and they want to give others their knowledge.

At the second meeting my daughter said “Mom, they just want to talk,” and she’s so right. Meetings are supposed to be two hours, but not one has ended on time because no one wants to leave. That speaks volumes.

At our first meeting we had 23 people, and each meeting averages about that many. We have new patients who look totally devastated when they walk in and relieved when they leave. It humbles me to see how everyone touches a life in there.

How is this type of peer partnering different from your other health-related relationships?

For me, this disease has become a full-time job. I’m in a clinical trial, I am in a transplant program at one hospital and being evaluated at another at the moment. That’s in addition to going to the gym to stay strong or to pulmonary rehab maintenance. I have to make sure that all my tests are updated so life becomes one big doctor’s appointment. The doctors, coordinators, nurses, technicians, etc. are all very nice and helpful, but there is nothing like being able to vent your frustration or talk about the excitement of “passing” a test to another patient. Someone who knows exactly what you are going through. It’s priceless, really.

What have been some of the challenges of starting a support group?

I’ve been lucky, the only challenge I’ve had is getting the facility to let us start a meeting. Once that was cleared it’s been a breeze. The Hospital for Special Care has been so very good to me. The Pulmonary staff is so caring and awesome to deal with. I became a Support Group Leader with the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF). They provide grants to start a group and educational booklets. Most importantly they provide support to the support group leaders. I’m told by other leaders that it’s a challenge getting presenters. I’m sure I will have that issue eventually but being a new group that hasn’t happened yet.

What do you enjoy most about it?

I truly enjoy seeing the patients and caregivers. The more patients and caregivers we have, the more family and friends we can educate. The more I get out of my own head and help others, the more emotionally strong and empowered I feel. Every time I see the number of people and new people who show up or even contact me I get emotional. Makes me realize how not alone I am.

Do you have any advice for others looking to start similar groups? 

Yes: Find a place, contact Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, and do it. There is definitely a need.

 

 

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“You may not like it, but make the MOST of it.” – An interview with IPF member Nikki

Posted January 1st, 2016 by

When Nikki (Nimiha) was diagnosed with IPF in 2010, she was already a survivor of both ovarian cancer and a heart attack. Staying positive and up-to-date on new information is now this retired RN’s best defense – and she’s been sharing it with her IPF family on PatientsLikeMe since March.

We had the chance to connect with her recently, and here’s what we learned …

1. Tell us about your life. What are your hobbies and interests? How do you most enjoy spending your time?

I was born 71 years ago in a town named Escondido, in Ca. My mother had been a Wave in the Navy in Washington, D.C. where she met my father, a career Marine. It was war time and he was transferred to Camp Pendleton Marine base in Oceanside, where he was immediately sent overseas to fight. I was an only child with no family living close by so my Mother and I were very close. My father went up through the ranks and was up for Brigadier General, and was honored to take over training the 7th Marines at Camp Pendleton in 1962. Two weeks later he died of a heart attack and my mother and I were forced to change our lives as well as our homes and lifestyle. She moved us to a town ten miles from where I was born. I went to college at PALOMAR Jr. College where I majored in boys. I married my husband, George, in August of 1963, and became a mother June 1964. You know the plan to wait a few years just didn’t work for us. You remember I said I majored in boys. Seems I didn’t know how to count and messed up the birth control pills ‍‍. I became a stay at home mom and our son was born four years later. Amazing how quickly you learn to count when needed. As my children grew, I became restless and went back to school. I discovered I wanted to become a nurse and take care of others so that was what I did. The kids were growing up and we were all going to school. I graduated with my R.N. in 1979 and became an oncology nurse specialist. That progressed to orthopedic nurse, home care nurse, then a MDS coordinator. I retired in 1996 after my son became ill with testicular cancer. He healed, my father-in-law died, I had ovarian cancer and one Thanksgiving night after everyone went home I suffered a heart attack at 53. During the next year I had seven stents that failed, had a triple bypass and did really well until last year. Then I caught the lingering cold everyone was catching, but mine wouldn’t go away. On my birthday I finally went to the doctor after four weeks. I was placed on ABT’s inhalers, and steroids. One week later I returned unable to breathe. It was at that time I was told they heard crackles and the X-ray showed IPF scarring. I had purchased a cruise to Hawaii for our Christmas present, but was unable to go. I was on oxygen and not feeling better. The 13th of Jan. I was in the hospital with pneumonia. My life of playing bingo, gaming at the casino’s and cruising was over as I knew it. I was still able to read, enjoy my backyard, and the glorious sunsets and the multitude of hummingbirds I feed. My life was changed but not over. I was able to enjoy the little things that made me happy. I was lucky to have my husband of 52 years with me, my daughter and my ten-year-old grandson as well. They are all my daily blessings and sources of enjoyment. Don’t get me wrong, it is not always sunny, but we are managing, one hour at a time. I have my moments full of tears, but, also joy in the little things. I try to deal with what cards I have been dealt with grace. Some days are better than others.

2. You’re very supportive to others in the forum. In a recent post, you said to another member, “We care, we know, we too are frightened by our diagnosis. Don’t feel alone, that no one cares. We may not be there physically to hold you in our arms, but you have many arms around you that DO CARE.” How have you, in turn, felt supported on the site?

I try to visit the site on a daily basis and interact with my family here. If they don’t post for a while I fret and worry. They fill my need to help others to help myself. This place is my safe place. I truly believe we are family and here to help each other. I am free to tell those who understand how miserable it is on some days. They understand and perk me up with their prayers and responses. I love that we are free to share everything or nothing. This is another part of home!

3. As a former RN, how do you think your past experience informs the advice you give to others?

Most often I have to censor myself because of my prejudices toward the medical profession today. I feel I know enough to give good information and resources if needed. I am not afraid to tell it like it is. We are not here for the fairytale version of what is happening to us. We are here for truth and knowledge that what we feel is normal or not. I listen to everyone and what they say to learn for myself. I hope they can feel the love that is offered even though there is such little hope at this time. I think the main thing I give is knowledge and comfort. At least I hope so.

4. Tell us about your diagnosis. What did you do/feel in the moments following it?

Like I said, it was very sudden when it finally showed up. A few years before before I was symptomatic, it was mentioned and I recall ignoring it, saying we would worry about it when we needed to. I was breathing and living a normal life and was truly not interested in it since it was incurable and not affecting me at the time. I think I knew last year when I was diagnosed my easy time was gone. I never wondered why me, never got mad. Why not me! I think what has affected me most is I promised my grandson to take him to see the glaciers in Alaska. I cannot afford the medical supplies that includes any longer and I hate that I didn’t take him sooner. I would love to book a cruise right now, but can’t afford to lose all that money if I get worse. I investigated it earlier last month and renting the portable concentrators that go high enough and the extra batteries and the scooter make it seem so much like a dream. I think the day I realized my dream to see my grandson’s face when he saw Glacier Bay and the calving was over was the day I felt the worst. I felt my dream die and even now it brings tears to my eyes and pain to my heart. My advice to my friends and family here is do what you need to do while you still can. Don’t let this disease kill your dreams if you can still do them. DO THEM IF YOU STILL CAN.

5. How would you best describe the feeling of living with IPF to someone who doesn’t have it?

I find it can be overwhelming depending on the day and what you want to get done. I am no longer independent and able to plan ahead. I need help with shopping because the cart won’t hold my oxygen and the weeks worth of groceries. I spend several days visiting different doctors every week between me and my husband, rather than going out to do what I want. I look good, feel pretty good for all that is wrong with me, I just can’t breath good. I tend to tire more easily than before and sometimes it is hard for people to understand. Like I say, I look well just sitting there with the cannula and oxygen tank or 50′ of tubing I walk around the house with. I have a love hate relationship with the oxygen. I am grateful for it making my like livable, but hate the way it looks, the constant noise and the dry nose and mouth.

Most people don’t know anything about IPF. I TELL THEM IT IS A TERMINAL DISEASE WHERE YOUR LUNGS QUIT EXPANDING AND COMPRESSING. They have two new medicines that may help prolong life with a better quality. Nothing out there to my knowledge will cure it. A lung transplant is a possibility for some but not me. I have already had my chest cracked when I had my bypass. I am too old and too fluffy to get one. So I live each day the best I can.

6. What advice would you give to a newly diagnosed person?

TALK, JOIN, DISCOVER ALL YOU CAN. THIS IS YOUR LIFE, KEEP UP WITH NEW INFORMATION. MOST OF ALL LOVE YOURSELF AND BE HAPPY YOU CAN CHANGE THINGS TO MAKE THEM BETTER with your attitude! You may not like it, but make the MOST of it.

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“Don’t go it alone” – IPF member Christine shares about her health journey

Posted April 24th, 2015 by

Christine_Williams was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in 2009, and ever since, she’s been managing a “rollercoaster ride that’s terrifying and not fun.” But she’s connected with your community on PatientsLikeMe for inspiration and was even referred to a new medical center to be evaluated for a lung transplant by her “rehabilitation buddies.” Below, read what Christine shared about her diagnosis, progression and thoughts on living with IPF.

Can you share a bit about your diagnosis experience? We’ve heard from many members that finding an official diagnosis isn’t always easy. What that true for you, too? 

Mostly no. In March 2009, I contracted pneumonia back to back within 8 weeks. It was around the time when the swine flu became a big deal, and I had visited Cancun, Mexico that year. I wasn’t necessarily in great health but fairly healthy. I had always attributed my shortness of breath to me being overweight. Because of the pneumonia, a CT scan was ordered. Then a bronchoscopy and finally a video assisted lung biopsy. I was diagnosed however right after the bronchoscopy. I started exhibiting shortness of breath symptoms in 2001. Even went through a series of PFTs at the time but was given an inhaler and told to lose weight. Ironically I didn’t start to suffer from REAL shortness of breath until after the diagnosis. Perhaps I had an exacerbation when sick with pneumonia. 

How has your IPF progressed over the past five years?

To tell you the truth, I really don’t know. I figured the doctor would tell me if there was an exacerbation or not. No news is good news? I do know that my disease had stabilized within 2 years because I was “kicked out” of the lung transplant program so to speak. I no longer needed to see the transplant team doctors however was recommended to still see my pulmonologist which I did. It was only the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (in October 2013) that the option of lung transplant is back on the table. I know I need to know this information and will ask my pulmonologist how my PF has progressed when I see her this month. I was only using oxygen at night until March 2013. Then I started using it full time. My liters per minute (LPM) has increased since then too (from 2-4 at rest and 4-6/10 on exertion).

Take us through a typical day in your life – how are you managing your IPF?

I officially retired from my job December 2014. I have up days and down days. Every morning I open my eyes, I thank God! I attend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays). I used to attend a yoga class given by the PR until it was cancelled. I hope they bring it back soon because it brings me much needed peace and helps me breath better. I try to be as “normal” as possible. I cook, clean, spend time with family and friends. I also help take care of my 5-year old twin grandsons for about 3 hours every day after school. I run errands; post office, dry cleaners, etc. Sometimes I go to the doctor by myself but most times I ask for someone to go with me; just to have another set of eyes and ears. I rely heavily on my support system both in person and on-line.

Since it looks like a lung transplant might be back on the table for you, can you tell us a little about what the experience has been like?

It is a very exhausting experience. I’m being evaluated by three different centers (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Temple University and New York Columbia Presbyterian). Every other week, I’m changing my mind. Traveling back and forth, making appointments, getting all the tests done can be extremely stressful. I was initially with the University of Pennsylvania lung transplant center. I was rejected by them because of esophageal issues. I was so defeated that I went home and cried and said I can’t do this anymore. But I guess God has something else in store for me. I was referred to UPMC and my cousin had a double lung transplant at Temple. One of my “rehabilitation buddies” went to NYCP and referred them to me. I am a part of the NYCP program and UPMC and Temple are in the process of testing me. I know that lung transplant is not a cure but an option. It’s trading one set of challenges for another. It is good to see some people that I have met on-line over the years thrive with transplant.

How have others in the IPF community on PatientsLikeMe helped support your journey?

Words cannot express how I feel about the IPF community! As I mentioned earlier, they are an important part of my inspiration. Their honesty, love, courage and encouragement help keep me going when I think I can’t go on anymore. I pray for our individual and collective healing on a daily basis. 

You post a bunch to the “Today’s Thought” thread in the forum – what is one thought you’d share with someone who has recently been diagnosed with IPF?

DON’T GO IT ALONE!!!! Please reach out to family and friends. Stay connected even if it’s online. Research face-to-face groups on the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation website. Talk to a therapist, priest, rabbi, etc. This can be a dark, lonely and scary experience; a rollercoaster ride that’s terrifying and not fun. Remember that you are not alone!!! And there is a whole community of us just waiting with open arms.

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“I continue to be inspired by those who share this fight with me” – PatientsLikeMe member Doug shares his journey with HP

Posted January 9th, 2015 by

Meet Doug. He’s part of the pulmonary fibrosis (PF) community on PatientsLikeMe and is living with a condition specifically known as chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). It’s similar to other types of PF, but also has its differences. We caught up with Doug for an interview to help spread the knowledge about these two conditions, but learned so much more. He shared what it’s like to live with HP, how he uses PatientsLikeMe to learn more about his own health and how the community has helped him to stay inspired in his fight.

Can you share a bit about your chronic HP? Can you explain to our blog followers how it’s different than IPF?

I believe the major difference is that with hypersensitivity pneumonitis there is a cause. If I’m correct there are three forms: acute, subacute and chronic. All are caused by exposure to an antigen that may or may not be identified. In my case, I have chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). My specialists have determined that it’s not necessary to identify the antigen since my condition is chronic and cannot be reversed.1

What was your diagnosis process like, and how was it different than what you’ve heard about getting diagnosed with IPF?

Of course I can’t compare how it ”feels” to have HP vs. IPF, and I’m no expert, but I will give you my version of the difference between HP and IPF. First, both are forms of pulmonary fibrosis. With HP, the fibrosis forms primarily higher up in the lungs, and IPF forms in the lower part of the lungs. Air trapping occurs in cHP but not in IPF. I have no idea how this impacts me as a patient, but I’ve included a comparison from Dr. Jeff Swigris.

Apparently another difference is that HP fibrosis is caused by inflammation, whereas IPF is caused by different forms of pro-fibrotic influences. Generally speaking, specialists recommend an anti-inflammatory drug (prednisone) and/or an immunosuppressive such as azathioprine, mycophenolate, cyclosporine, or cyclophosophamide. In my case, my doctor and I agreed on a course of mycophenolate. Initially, it had significant side effects, such as severe fatigue, poor sleep, weight gain and depression. I switched to Myfortic, which is a different brand of mycophenolate, and now the side effects are minimal. I have much more drive and I feel much better! It’s still too early to tell if it will help. My concern is that my pulmonary function test (PFT) results have dropped in the last four months, so I’m concerned that I’m deteriorating. At the moment, I function almost normally. I have a walking routine that includes a 7.5 K walk, which I can complete in an hour. I now require supplemental oxygen for long flights, but I still consider myself lucky!2

You frequently use the InstantMe and Quality of Life tools on PatientsLikeMe – why do you like to use these to donate your data?

I find it’s good to have a record of your health pattern. This can include how you feel daily as well as a record of the medications I’m on. I print out portions of this for my doctors’ appointments and it helps me be well prepared.

How have others in the HP and IPF communities on PatientsLikeMe helped support you on your journey?

My biggest concern is that HP is the “poor cousin” in the PF family! There are very few of us online and therefore it’s difficult to learn as much as I’d like to! Nevertheless, I have learned a lot about shared aspects of PF such as patient care, oxygen therapy and lifestyle issues. I continue to be inspired by those who share this fight with me and I’m always grateful when I’m able to learn something that will help me.

I’ve always told my wife I plan to die of old age! One of my strengths is that I have a great attitude. Participating in platforms like PatientsLikeMe helps me not only learn more, but it fortifies my attitude!

Many people may not know about rare conditions like HP and IPF. If there was one thing you thought someone who doesn’t have a clue should know about HP, what would it be?

That’s a tough question because there is so much more I need to learn before I feel I can address this question. I suppose the key with HP is that if you have developed acute or subacute forms of the disease you may be able to arrest the fibrosis before it progresses too far.

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1 http://nationaljewish.org/Participation-Program-for-Pulmonary-Fibrosis/Community/Blog/Participation-Program-for-Pulmonary-Fibrosis/November-2013/What-is-Chronic-Hypersensitivity-Pneumonitis

2 http://nationaljewish.org/Participation-Program-for-Pulmonary-Fibrosis/Community/Blog/Participation-Program-for-Pulmonary-Fibrosis/November-2013/Some-of-the-nuance-about-cHP


2014 recap – a year of sharing in the PatientsLikeMe community

Posted December 23rd, 2014 by

Another year has come and gone here at PatientsLikeMe, and as we started to look back at who’s shared their experiences, we were quite simply amazed. More than 30 members living with 9 different conditions opened up for a blog interview in 2014. But that’s just the start. Others have shared about their health journeys in short videos and even posted about their favorite food recipes.

A heartfelt thanks to everyone who shared their experiences this year – the PatientsLikeMe community is continuing to change healthcare for good, and together, we can help each other live better as we move into 2015.

Team of Advisors
In September, we announced the first-ever PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors, a group of 14 members that will work with us this year on research-related initiatives. They’ve been giving regular feedback about how PatientsLikeMe research can be even more helpful, including creating a “guide” that highlights new standards for researchers to better engage with patients. We introduced everyone to three so far, and look forward to highlighting the rest of team in 2015.

  • Meet Becky – Becky is a former family nurse practitioner, and she’s a medically retired flight nurse who is living with epilepsy and three years out of treatment for breast cancer.
  • Meet Lisa – Lisa was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in 2008, and just recently stopped working as a full-time executive due to non-motor PD symptoms like loss of function, mental fatigue and daytime insomnolence. Her daughter was just married in June.
  • Meet Dana – Dana is a poet and screenplay writer living in New Jersey and a very active member of the mental health and behavior forum. She’s living with bipolar II, and she’s very passionate about fighting the stigma of mental illness.

The Patient Voice
Five members shared about their health journeys in short video vignettes.

  • Garth – After Garth was diagnosed with cancer, he made a promise to his daughter Emma: he would write 826 napkin notes so she had one each day in her lunch until she graduated high school.
  • Letitia – has been experiencing seizures since she was ten years old, and she turned to others living with epilepsy on PatientsLikeMe.
  • Bryan – Bryan passed away earlier in 2014, but his memory lives on through the data he shared about idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. He was also an inaugural member of the Team of Advisors.
  • Becca – Becca shared her experiences with fibromyalgia and how she appreciates her support on PatientsLikeMe.
  • Ed – Ed spoke about his experiences with Parkinson’s disease and why he thinks it’s all a group effort.

Patient interviews
More than 30 members living with 9 different conditions shared their stories in blog interviews.

Members living with PTSD:

  • David Jurado spoke in a Veteran’s podcast about returning home and life after serving
  • Lucas shared about recurring nightmares, insomnia and quitting alcohol
  • Jess talked about living with TBI and her invisible symptoms
  • Jennifer shared about coping with triggers and leaning on her PatientsLikeMe community

Member living with Bipolar:

  • Eleanor wrote a three-part series about her life with Bipolar II – part 1, part 2, part 3

Members living with MS:

  • Fred takes you on a visual journey through his daily life with MS
  • Anna shared about the benefits of a motorized scooter, and a personal poem
  • Ajcoia, Special1, and CKBeagle shared how they raise awareness through PatientsLikeMeInMotion™
  • Nola and Gary spoke in a Podcast on how a PatientsLikeMe connection led to a new bathroom
  • Tam takes you into a day with the private, invisible pain of MS
  • Debbie shared what it’s like to be a mom and blogger living with MS
  • Shep spoke about keeping his sense of humor through his journey with MS
  • Kim shared about her fundraising efforts through PatientsLikeMeInMotion™
  • Jazz1982 shared how she eliminates the stigma surrounding MS
  • Starla talked about MS awareness and the simple pleasure of riding a motorcycle

Members living with Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis:

Members living with Parkinson’s disease:

  • Dropsies shared about her frustrating Parkinson’s diagnosis experience and how diabetes might impact her future eating habits

Members living with ALS:

  • Steve shared the story behind his film, “My Motor Neuron Disease Made Easier”
  • Steven shared how technology allows him to participate in many events
  • Steve shared about creating the Steve Saling ALS residence and dealing with paramedics
  • Steve told why he participated in the Ice Bucket Challenge
  • Dee revealed her tough decision to insert a feeding tube
  • John shared about his cross-country road trip with his dog, Molly

Members living with lung cancer:

  • Vickie shared about her reaction to getting diagnosed, the anxiety-filled months leading up to surgery and what recovery was like post-operation
  • Phil shared the reaction she had after her blunt diagnosis, her treatment options and her son’s new tattoo

Members living with multiple myeloma:

  • AbeSapien shared about his diagnosis experience with myeloma, the economic effects of his condition and his passion for horseback riding

Caregiver for a son living with AKU:

  • Alycia and Nate shared Alycia’s role and philosophy as caregiver to young Nate, who is living with AKU

Food for Thought
Many members shared their recipes and diet-related advice on the forums in 2014.

  • April – first edition, and what you’re making for dinner
  • May – nutrition questions and the primal blueprint
  • June – getting sleepy after steak and managing diet
  • July – chocolate edition
  • August – losing weight and subbing carbs
  • September – fall weather and autumn recipes
  • Dropsies – shared her special diabetes recipes for Diabetes Awareness Month

Patients as Partners
More than 6,000 members answered questions about their health and gave feedback on the PatientsLikeMe Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. ORE gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their opinion about each question in a researcher’s health measure. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

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“We are many” – PatientsLikeMe member Laura reports back on her experiences as a panelist at the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF

Posted October 17th, 2014 by

Just yesterday, you saw our very own Sally Okun RN, Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety, reported back about her experiences at the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF. And today, we wanted to share the patient experience. For each public meeting, the FDA invites patients and caregivers to apply to be a panelist and share their real-world experiences with the disease – and Laura (LaurCT) was selected to attend! So, along with Sally, Laura headed to Silver Springs, Maryland and spoke to the FDA about what life if really like living with IPF. Check out how it all went below.

Laura was officially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in May 2013, but was living with symptoms for years before that. She’s really an inspirational member of the community and always has her 3-stars (which means Laura is a super health data donor!).

Why did you want to be part of the FDA public meeting?

It was simple for me, I wanted to be part of the solution. When I was diagnosed with IPF I was quite the mess as many of us are. I’m a fighter. I just can’t sit back and do nothing. So, once I got over the total devastation I wanted to fight for me, for others and especially for my children. We all have our strengths and fundraising is not one of mine. I can stand up and tell how hard it is to live with this disease, not just medically, but the changes and decisions we all have to make that seem small to some but are huge to people who are living with this disease. It was important for me to be able to give back in some way to those that helped me through all this.

What did it mean to be accepted?

When I filled out the summary I felt no way will I be accepted so I’m not going to worry about it. When I received that email from the FDA that said, “We would like to extend an invitation to you to present your comments during the panel discussion on Topic 1,” I had to read it twice. My next reaction was of total humility, to represent so many patients on a panel and to tell people what we all face was such an honor. My next reaction was to share the good news with Sarah on PatientsLikeMe because I knew she’d be just as excited for me.

What was it like being there as a patient representative speaking at the FDA event? Did you feel like your voice was heard?

It was amazing! I wasn’t alone – there were 8 panelists who have been affected by this awful disease and 4 of us were IPF Patients. As panelists were speaking on their experiences, I would look at the FDA representatives and I could see that they were moved. That is what we went there to do and I truly believe we accomplished that.

What did you learn when you were there?

As many of us have had to do, I have had major changes this last year. Changes that really impacted me. After our panel was done there was a break and people were coming up to me and talking to me about their own experience or thanking me.  It was an unbelievable experience. I learned that I still could contribute in some way. It is good to know what we were doing was important. It gave me a bit of that feeling of accomplishment and purpose that I’ve been missing lately.

How do you feel about your pursuits as an advocate for IPF after having this experience under your belt?

I’m still whirling from the experience. I would love being an advocate for IPF, getting the word out is so important. I was just at the COE I go to for the clinical trial I’m in and I was telling them about my experience and showing them the pictures. There are opportunities to be interviewed by some doctors and the center said they would give out my name when the opportunity arises.

When I completed the summary for the FDA I thought ‘I can really do this!’ So, when I was asked to participate in an afternoon education session for 2nd year medical students at UCONN School of Medicine I said yes. The discussion will be on the impact of chronic diseases on patients and family. You can bet I will tell them the disease that I have. It’s exciting to get that word out so when they become practicing medical professionals and they hear idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or pulmonary fibrosis, they will hopefully remember what it is.

I just want to add the biggest thing the experience gave me. The in person support groups are few for IPF. In my area there is only 1 and it’s quarterly. The virtual support groups like PatientsLikeMe have been a life changing experience. Many of us feel compassion for each other and cry when they cry and laugh when they laugh and praise those who have accomplished milestones like increase in PFTs or Pulmonary Rehab. It was these virtual groups that got me to a COE and on my journey to living with IPF and not dying with IPF. It still brings me to tears remembering looking out into the audience and seeing over 100 IPF patients some that I have spoken to online and seeing them in person literally takes my breath away to know I really am not alone and that we are many. I got to talk to them in person.

The pictures – UGH! I hate my steroid looks but as Diane, another patient said, this is our new normal. So the selfies are there! Sally taking a picture of me at the FDA podium ~ we got to sit when we spoke with Dr. Lederer from NY Presbyterian Transplant Team, with Diane another IPF panelist and with Sally from PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe helps so many diseases online and we can think of it as just another online place and not realize there are people behind the scenes that really care for us. Meeting Sally from PatientsLikeMe and seeing her stand up and speak with such compassion about IPF puts a face to such a wonderful organization. I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity; you can’t imagine in a million years what it meant to me. I will be forever grateful.

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Sally Okun reports back from the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF

Posted October 16th, 2014 by

On September 26th I was at the FDA for the Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF. This is one of 20 meetings that the FDA is holding to learn directly from patients and their caregivers about daily life with the specific condition’s symptoms and treatments. (You can learn more about these meetings here.) I have attended a number of these meetings and often have meaningful data to share from our own PatientsLikeMe members. So far, however, the FDA has only allowed patients and caregivers to present and participate as panelists.

So to get as much of our members’ real-world health data in front of the FDA as possible, I take full advantage of the public comment period at the end of each meeting. It’s a short 3-5 minutes of time, but it’s a chance to share insights from PatientsLikeMe members and to reflect on some of what’s been discussed during the public meeting. In addition, we submit a full report to the FDA’s public docket that is open for comment two full months following the meeting. The report includes a community profile and the results of any polls PatientsLikeMe members have taken part in prior to the meeting.

This meeting was different
It was my pleasure and privilege to meet and spend time with a member of our PatientsLikeMe community who was selected by the FDA to be one of the panelists. LaurCT did an amazing job sharing her challenge in getting an accurate diagnosis – which took a number of years. She also shared with the FDA and all the folks in the room that she did not learn about the Center of Excellence for IPF located only an hour from her home from her now former pulmonologist after finally getting the diagnosis of IPF – she learned about it from other IPF patients on PatientsLikeMe. (Thank you for sharing Laura!)

Many in the room acknowledged that a cure may not be found in their lifetime but they also conveyed to the FDA a palpable sense of urgency for treatments to slow the progression of the disease to reduce their symptom burden and increase their ability to participate more fully in life. What was startling was how often people shared how the lack of knowledge about IPF among physicians – even among pulmonary specialists – led to delays in their diagnosis and for some resulted in misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

One specialist, Dr. David Lederer, co-director of the interstitial lung disease program at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City and well known to many patients in the room for his work in IPF, used his few minutes in the public comment period to call for therapies that help his patients “live longer, healthier, more normal and independent lives.” He provocatively said that “oxygen should be free” and called for more study of the benefits of oxygen combined with exercise which today are the only things that help people with IPF actually feel better. This was borne out in our poll as well.

A family thing
In addition, there is an important familial connection that many feel is not getting sufficient attention in research. One woman shared her family’s story starting with her father’s diagnosis and death followed by the deaths of each of his 4 brothers of the same disease. A number of people talked about family members who died over the years with similar respiratory symptoms and questioned whether they in fact may have died of undiagnosed IPF.

Your voices transformed
While the opportunity for patients to be heard cannot be diminished, I along with others in policy and advocacy circles remain concerned by the anecdotal nature of these FDA proceedings. At each meeting, there are a few polling questions with audience clicker devices, but there is no systematic way of transforming the very powerful patient narratives that are shared into meaningful and usable data. At PatientsLikeMe, your stories and your voices are best amplified and speak most loudly when transformed into data that is both meaningful and measureable.

All that said, it’s worth watching the free webcasts of the meeting, which you can find here.

PatientsLikeMe member SallyOkun

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Shining the spotlight on pulmonary fibrosis

Posted September 17th, 2014 by

 

You may have seen our post on Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, but did you know September is also Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month? The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) wants everyone to shine the spotlight on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and many PatientsLikeMe members have already shared their stories – Lori documented her journey from diagnosis to transplant in a 4-part blog interview series, along with Barbara and John.

We also wanted to pause for just a minute to recognize PatientsLikeMe member Bryan. He joined the community in 2013 after being diagnosed with IPF and was an inaugural member of our Team of Advisors.

We are sad to share that last month, Bryan passed away, and all of our thoughts are with his family, friends and fellow PatientsLikeMe community members. But even though Bryan may no longer be with us, his memory and data live on. The experiences he shared will help drive change in IPF and in healthcare. We can think of no better way to pay tribute than to share his recent video with everyone. Bryan, you will be missed.

In Memoriam
Bryan Kincaid


(1947-2014)


Let the world know about pulmonary fibrosis

Posted September 7th, 2014 by

On Rare Disease Day back in February 2013, we announced our partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim to help enhance the online idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) community. And by September 7th that same year, the community had grown to just over 1,000 people. Today, on the next edition of Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, the community stands 2,500+ members strong, making it the largest online gathering of IPF patients anywhere in the world. In just a year, the community has almost tripled in size, and everyone is sharing about their experiences so that other patients, doctors and researchers can learn more about life with IPF.

But what exactly is IPF? Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a medical condition that causes lung tissue to thicken, stiffen and scar over a period of time, and “idiopathic” means “no known cause.” According to the Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis, there are over 100,000 Americans living with IPF at any given time, and an estimated 40,000 will die from the condition every year. And besides a complete lung transplant, there is no known cure for IPF.1

Today, the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) is encouraging everyone to educate, share, fundraise and start conversations about IPF. You can learn more about how to get involved through the PFF’s toolkit and guidelines for September.  And if you or someone you know has been diagnosed with IPF, join the community at PatientsLikeMe – let’s change who knows about this condition and promote a better understanding of IPF all year round.

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1 http://www.coalitionforpf.org/facts-about-idiopathic-pulmonary-fibrosis/


“No oxygen.” PatientsLikeMe member Lori shares about life after surviving idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Posted August 3rd, 2014 by

It’s crazy to think how fast things can happen. The last time we talked with Lori, she was telling us about life on the lung transplant list and playing what she called “the waiting waltz.” And now – everything has changed. Just two weeks after we posted her third interview on the PatientsLikeMe blog in mid April, Lori got the call – they had a set of lungs for her. We caught up with Lori one more time, and fifteen weeks post transplant, she’s nothing but smiles. Check out what she had to share and don’t forget to follow Lori on her own blog called Reality Gasps. (Thank you Lori for being so open about your experiences with IPF!)

 

 

What was your reaction when you got ‘the call?’ You mention a whole range of emotions on your blog.

The call took me completely by surprise. I’d been admitted to the hospital a week earlier because we just couldn’t meet my oxygen needs at home any more. I was literally 10-minutes away from starting a procedure to suppress my antibodies (to help increase my somewhat slim chances of finding a match) when the nurse walked in and told me they might have lungs for me.  Actually she said they “might, might, might, might, might” have lungs – normally they wouldn’t have contacted me that early in the process, but they had to cancel my procedure just in case. I felt an initial jolt of adrenalin and couldn’t help busting out in a huge grin. I quickly tamped down my euphoria, though. There was still a long way to go and anything could happen.

An hour later when I heard we were moving forward, I burst into tears. A year’s worth of pent up emotion poured out through those wracking sobs. I couldn’t believe my miracle was so close. But wrapped up in my joy was guilt that my chance to live was coming through the death of another.

Until the moment they put me under, my emotions continued to cycle from near manic joy, to fear that the lungs wouldn’t be right, to anguish for my donor and his family. Everyone says it’s a roller coaster, but like parenthood, you can’t really understand what that means until you live it.

What happens between getting the call and going into surgery?

Since I was already in the hospital, there was no mad dash for me. When the team decided to move forward, I was sent down for pre-surgery testing — a chest x-ray and blood work. Then we waited, and waited for a good 12 hours. Finally I was sent down to pre-op at 2:00 AM to get ready for surgery at 3:00. They inserted an arterial line and an IV. And they checked and rechecked my drug allergies and medical history. I was the only person in pre-op, but I still had to recite my name and birth date for everyone who came by!

My surgeon arrived and told me he’d heard about my surgery early enough to make sure he got a good night’s sleep with plenty of time for breakfast. I’d brought a disposable camera to get pictures during surgery, so he talked me through his typical “shot list”. I couldn’t wait to see those beautiful new pink lungs!

Just before I was to head to the OR, the doc got a call from the retrieval team that we were delayed for an hour. He said this was very common — they had to wait for all of the teams to arrive before they could start. We were delayed twice more as teams continued to fly in. When I finally made it to the operating room, I was surrounded by people and equipment. They explained each step as they got me situated on the table, and then the anesthesiologist placed a big mask over my face. Thankfully, I remember nothing until they removed the breathing tube three days later.

Fifteen weeks post transplant – how’s recovery and rehab going?

Full recovery takes about a year, but I am astonished at how far I’ve come in just three months. I went into surgery pretty weak because I didn’t have the energy (or the breath) to move much.  A lot of people told me to keep my legs as strong as possible and I quickly learned why. Post-surgery, I was on high-dose prednisone, which is very hard on the quadriceps – my thighs felt like jelly. Most people are up and walking shortly after their breathing tube is removed. I ended up needing a trach, so it was about a week before I took my first steps. I walked nearly 200 feet that first day and increased my distance and strength every time I hit the halls.

The day after I left the hospital, I returned for my first out-patient rehab appointment. I walked 15 minutes on the treadmill at a smokin’ 0.5 mph. Within a few days, I was up to 30 minutes and started to increase my speed. Now I’m walking two miles a day around the neighborhood and am working hard toward a 15-minute mile. It’s the hardest work I’ve ever done, but it is so worth it!

The one thing that really took me by surprise was the mental part of rehab. Before transplant, my body worked very hard to breath.  Shortness of breath meant my body needed more oxygen. But after transplant, neither one of those was true anymore. It was difficult to accept that I didn’t need to consciously breathe – my lungs could take care of that on their own.  After a week, I would periodically “forget” to breathe and be surprised to discover my lungs were working just fine. When I was walking laps around the halls, I would periodically get short of breath and start to panic – there was no valve to turn up my O2!  The pulse oximeter showed my sats were well into the 90s. I was short of breath because my body was weak, not my lungs. Thankfully, breathing is once again second nature!

What comes to mind when you think back on everything you’ve gone through – diagnosis to transplant?

I went through the same fear that most people do when they are diagnosed with IPF. The prognosis is pretty bleak: no treatment, no cure, progressive. But I decided early on that I was going to live my life as normally as possible – and do everything I could to prepare myself ready for transplant.

I continued to work for nine months, using oxygen at the office. But after two pneumonias, it was clear that my body was too fragile for the daily grind.  Without work distracting me, priorities and perspectives shifted. Everything suddenly had a sense of urgency. There might not be time “some day” to get back in touch with that friend, or tell my brothers how much they really meant to me. I had to let go of the things that had consumed me, like worry and regret, so I would have time and energy to do work on my life “to do” list.

I worried that after transplant, when things returned to normal, I would soon forget the lessons I’d learned. This whole experience has been a journey toward gratitude, and I realize now I will never be the person I was before – physically, emotionally or spiritually. Every morning I give thanks for my first waking breath. Throughout the day, I find the most delightful surprises – like watching a mama squirrel move her babies to a safer home. And sometimes I just stop and marvel at the air passing in and out of my lungs, lungs that once breathed in someone else’s chest. I spent three years quietly saying goodbye to all the things and people I loved. Now I get to spend the rest of my life saying “hello” again!

Additional comments from Lori

We just returned from our celebration trip to Sanibel Island, one of my favorite places in the world. For the first time since my diagnosis, I was able to walk the beach without tanks in tow. The image of Sanibel’s shell-strewn beaches and the memory of that rich briny air kept me pushing forward as first I struggled to breathe in ICU, and then sweated my way through PT and rehab.

At least once a day while we were there, my husband whispered to me “No oxygen”. It felt like a dream, a wonderful, amazing dream. We’ve been going to Sanibel for 25 years. It’s a huge part of our family tradition, and making it back there was an important milestone for me. A plaque on the wall at our beach condo read “If you’re lucky enough to be at the beach, you’re lucky enough.” That’s pretty much the way I feel about everything now!


The Patient Voice- PF member Bryan shares his story

Posted July 10th, 2014 by

 

Since we announced #dataforgood back in March, many PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about why they donate their own health experiences. Becca (fibromyalgia) and Ed (Parkinson’s) already shared their stories, and now we’re hearing from Bryan, an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) member. Check out his video above. Miss Becca or Ed’s? Watch them here.

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“Gee, doc, ya think?” – Barbara speaks about her diagnosis and life with IPF

Posted May 19th, 2014 by

PatientsLikeMe member Barbara (CatLady51) recently shared about her journey with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in an interview with us, and she spoke about everything from the importance of taking ownership of managing her condition to how she hopes to “turn on the light bulb” by donating her personal health data. Read her full interview about living with IPF below.

Some PF members report having difficulty finding a diagnosis – was this the case with you? What was your experience like? 

My journey started back in 2005, when after my first chest cold that winter, I was left with severe coughing spells and shortness of breath. An earlier chest x-ray didn’t indicate any issues, so I was referred to a local community-based respirologist (what we call a pulmonologist here in Canada) who wasn’t concerned with my PFT results. I also had a complete cardiovascular workup, again with no alarming results.

Then, in 2008, I had another chest cold. Growing up in a family of smokers and being the only non-smoker, I seemed to have managed to miss having chest colds, but 2005 and 2008 were definite exceptions. Again, a normal x-ray, another visit to the respirologist and another PFT that didn’t send up any alarms [although looking back at both 2005 and 2008, I can see where there was a definite indication that I was heading towards restrictive breathing problems]. Inhalers only made the coughing worse. The respirologist said I had “sensitive lungs” – gee, doc you think?

Then, in November 2010, I was laid out with another chest cold, coughing my lungs inside out, barely able to walk 10 feet. So the new family doctor calls me. This time, the x-ray report came back that I was showing signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD). What? So onto the computer and in to see the family doctor. When the doctor suggested sending me back to the local community-based respirologist I had previously seen, I said NO BLOODY WAY!

Instead, through a friend who is a thoracic surgeon at the University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto, I got a quick appointment at the ILD Clinic at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) in January 2011. Since I hadn’t yet had a HRCT, I was sent for one and returned to the clinic in June. The initial diagnosis was probably IPF, but maybe NSIP since my HRCT didn’t show the UIP-pattern. The decision was made to treat as IPF so no harmful treatment was undertaken. A biopsy was discussed, but was considered too early for that invasive test and that instead my disease would be monitored via non-invasive tests.

My ILD/PF specialist continued to monitor me and after another exacerbation early in 2012 and the PFT showing a progression of my lung disease, we decided to send me for a VATS biopsy. The September 2012 biopsy clearly indicated the UIP-pattern of lung damage and the IPF diagnosis was confirmed.

Over the last few years, I’ve learned a great deal. I know that the road to diagnosis is often long and complex with not all the pieces of information presenting at the same time — seldom with one test or series of tests taken at one point in time. I feel I’m fortunate that first I had that very unsatisfactory experience with the local community-based respirologist and that through my husband’s work we had met and become friends with a thoracic surgeon who is on the lung transplant team at TGH.

So even though I “naturally” followed the recommended course of action to get myself to an ILD/PF expert, my path to diagnosis wasn’t instantaneous. My biopsy could have just as easily shown that I had a treatable form of PF — still not good news but a different path.

Now with a confirmed IPF diagnosis, I’ve been assessed for transplant (June 2013) and found suitable but too early. But another winter of exacerbations and my ILD/PF specialist is now talking about going on the waiting list.

Another PF member, Lori, spoke about her “new normal” – how did your diagnosis change daily life?

Yes, life with PF has certainly been a series of adjusting to the “new normal” but up until February 2013 when I started oxygen therapy, the changes were small. I had to explain to people why I broke into coughing fits while talking on the phone or in person. I had to explain to people who offered water that thank you but it didn’t help since it was just my lungs telling me to talk slower or shut up. I had to explain to people that I wasn’t contagious when coughing. I had to explain to people that the huffing and puffing were just the “new me” and that they didn’t need to feel they had to jump in — that I would ask when I needed help.

But since going on oxygen therapy with my new facial jewelry and my constant buddy, I don’t have to explain that I have a disease but some people still like to ask questions and I enjoy answering them.

Life with PF and supplemental oxygen is definitely more complicated. I started with high-flow for exertion (6 lpm) and liquid oxygen (LOX). So I can’t spontaneously take off overnight (I would have to make arrangements about a week ahead to have  equipment and supplies delivered at my destination) and I probably can’t fly. But I’m a homebody so that has affected me very little. But I can’t leave the house without considering how long I will be and how many of my LOX portables to take with me.

I still do my own driving, shopping, cooking, housework, and one or two 2-mile walks per day on the farm property — over hilly landscape — because I’m de-conditioned after this past winter. I’m currently having to use 8-10 lpm for those walks but I’m doing them. Use it or lose it!

What made you decide to get so involved in the PatientsLikeMe community and how has it helped you better understand your own PF?

Involvement with PatientsLikeMe was more of a knowledge-based decision. I believe that knowledge is power and knowing as much as I can about my disease helps me to manage the disease. For me, support is sharing what I have found and providing directions to that information for others. Then it is up to them to read the information and decide how, or if, it applies to them.

I believe in being my own medical advocate in charge of my medical team. I’ve probably had a natural propensity for that but my way of thinking in not being a traditional patient was affirmed by Dr. Devin Starlanyl, a doctor with fibromyalgia who wrote The Fibromyalgia Advocate. Fibromyalgia is a matter of living with and managing the symptoms and dealing with different medical specialties to achieve that BUT also accepting that you as the patient are central to treatment and management.

I believe that living with PF is that way as well. The doctors can only do so much. There is no single silver bullet that they can give us, no matter what type of PF, to make it all go away. We have a core set of symptoms BUT we don’t all have all the same symptoms. We have to take ownership for our disease management.

So at PatientsLikeMe, I seek to not only learn but to share what I’ve learned. If I can help one other person shorten their learning curve then perhaps I’ve helped.

On your PatientsLikeMe profile, you reported using a pulse oximeter in 2013 – how did you like it? What did it help you learn?

I found that I was having to slow down too much or struggle too much to breathe. My walking test was not yet indicating that I qualified for oxygen therapy but rather was on the cusp of requiring supplemental oxygen. I was concerned about the damage to my body.

I purchased an inexpensive pulse oximeter to check my saturation. I soon realized that being short of breath was not a reliable indicator that my oxygen saturation had dropped below 90%. Having the oximeter to give me a measure of my saturation helped me to better interpret and listen to the other biofeedback that my body was giving me.

The oximeter helped me to manage my activity so that fear didn’t turn me into a tortoise that either slowed way down or seldom moved. I got a better handle on just how much and how fast I could do things to keep active, to keep my body healthy, to exercise all the parts of my respiratory system, and yet to do it SAFELY!

Looks like you use your profile tracking charts and reports a lot on PatientsLikeMe- why do you donate so much health data, and how do you think that will change healthcare for people living with PF?

Again, my propensity. I love learning! I love sharing what I learn! I keep my own spreadsheets with my medical data but that only benefits me. I know that one of the problems for researchers is accessing a sample population large enough to make meaningful inferences from their findings. And finding a large population in a given geographical area for a rare disease is difficult. Going outside the geographical area is expensive. So hopefully the remote sharing of information will be the answer.

We are all so very different and so many of us also have other health issues on top of the PF. So who knows what comparing us will show? But throughout life I’ve been amazed at how seemingly inconsequential, seemingly totally unconnected pieces of information can come together at a later point and TURN ON the light bulb!

So why not share my health data? It really is anonymous. Unless I provide more identifying information, I’m just a name and a face but maybe with enough names and faces we can get some answers that will benefit us all.

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Patients as Partners: The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale questionnaire results

Posted April 18th, 2014 by

Back at the beginning of April, we launched a new blog series called Patients as Partners that highlights the results and feedback PatientsLikeMe members give to questionnaires on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. This time around, we’re sharing the results of the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS), a health measure that looks at how confident people are in managing their own conditions. More than 1,500 members from 9 different condition communities on PatientsLikeMe took part. They worked with our research partner Ken Wallston from Vanderbilt University to make the tool the best it can be. (Thank you to everyone that participated! This is your data doing good.) Check out the PMCSMS results and keep your eyes peeled for more ORE questionnaire results as we continue the series on the blog.

What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.