17 posts tagged “PF”

Meeting PF patients where they are

Posted May 8th, 2017 by

Say hello to John (John_R), a father, grandfather and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) survivor. Sound familiar? Last year he shared his story about life after a double lung transplant and the importance of considering a lung transplant early. This year, John started a Facebook group to live-stream pulmonary fibrosis (PF) support group meetings and conferences.

“I am very passionate about honoring the precious gift provided by my donor family and in living a life worthy of their generosity.”

John received a bilateral lung transplant on January 1st, 2015, and believes he’s alive today thanks to his donor family and care team at UT Southwestern in Dallas. Now, he’s committed to raising awareness for the needs of the pulmonary fibrosis community.

Life after transplant

John’s life before transplant included the use of supplemental oxygen 24 hours a day, and what he calls, “an eminent expiration date” in his near future. He couldn’t visit family in Colorado or the higher elevations of New Mexico due to the altitude, and every breath was a struggle.

“The biggest thing about life after lung transplant is that I no longer have a firm expiration date, I can have hope. I can go to Colorado and attend medical conferences. I can help others by sharing my experiences and the knowledge I’ve gained. I have also learned to cherish the moments that make living wonderful.  A moment of kindness, shared empathy or even a smile mean so much to me now. The rest doesn’t really matter. Life is good.”

Fighting isolation with the help of Facebook

According to John, many people diagnosed with IPF have never even heard of the disease prior to hearing of it from their doctor. Then they learn that their disease has no cure and only a couple of treatments that slow the progress of fibrosis for some. Online research about IPF offers little comfort either. John’s experience motivated him to start an online support group using Facebook Live.

 

“IPF can be a very isolating disease. Your friends and family have never heard of it and you are reminded of your mortality with every breath. In my case, each trip to the pulmonologist was just proof that my disease was progressing. A support group can help with the feelings of isolation and loneliness, plus provide valuable information and hope for the future.”

 

After trying a paid platform to share their meetings, but finding it too difficult for some participants to access, John thought Facebook Live seemed a good option. Once someone has joined the group they get a notification when the support group goes live.

“They are then just one click away from being able to join the meeting and participate with folks who share the same journey.”

Though the Facebook group is new and participation is growing, John hopes that it will help people understand that they are not alone, and that he can provide some valuable information about IPF and lung transplants.

Managing with PatientsLikeMe

“I use PatientsLikeMe to track my data and as a platform to share with others in our community. I can easily view my lung function both before and after my transplant, track my weight loss and ensure I am maintaining a healthy weight, and keep an eye on A1C, cholesterol, and all my medications in one place. PatientsLikeMe has also given me the opportunity to participate in studies and share my voice with the healthcare community.
 

“The pulmonary fibrosis community on PatientsLikeMe was my anchor when I was coming to terms with my IPF diagnosis, and continues support now that I’ve had a transplant.”

 

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Patients as Partners: Member Laura on launching a PF support group

Posted June 24th, 2016 by

Laura (standing on left) at the June meeting of the New Britain PF Support Group

Over the past few months, the Team of Advisors has been sharing how they use the Partnership Principles in their personal health journeys. Laura, who’s living with IPF, recently sat down with us to talk about the New Britain PF Support Group she launched in Connecticut, and how important it is to have a community of people who know what you’re going through. Check out the Q&A below to see how she helps patients, caregivers, and their families understand that they’re not alone.

Tell us a little about the New Britain PF Support Group — who’s involved and what’s the goal?

The New Britain PF Support Group had the first meeting September 2015. The meeting is for the patient and caregiver, plus family and friends who may be interested in understanding what their loved one is going through.

The goal is to provide information on PF/IPF. Knowledge can empower the patient and caregiver to work with their doctors and professional team. Most importantly, the support group lets people know they are not alone — we are all in this together and we understand.

How did you come up with the idea of creating the group?

There was only one support group in Connecticut and it was quarterly in New Haven, about an hour away from me. I would go and get such wonderful information and talk to some really awesome people, both professionals and patients. Most of the patients were from the southern part of CT, and I felt that people in the northern part of the state would benefit from a face-to-face support group meeting. I knew from going to the meetings at Yale New Haven Hospital that I always left there feeling more empowered and emotionally stronger. I wanted other PF/IPF patients to feel the same.

Since September 2015, another group has been started further west. In attending those meetings I’ve met new patients. It’s exciting to see that we are touching more and more PF/IPF patients who didn’t have face-to-face support with others who shared the same issue.

What’s the most beneficial aspect of partnering with others who know what you’re going through?

We have quarterly meetings and while the first part is educational (information about what is going on in treatments for IPF/PF), the majority of the meeting is support. If you sat in the corner and watched, you’d notice that the patients and caregivers are like sponges. They want to get information from others who’ve “been there” and they want to give others their knowledge.

At the second meeting my daughter said “Mom, they just want to talk,” and she’s so right. Meetings are supposed to be two hours, but not one has ended on time because no one wants to leave. That speaks volumes.

At our first meeting we had 23 people, and each meeting averages about that many. We have new patients who look totally devastated when they walk in and relieved when they leave. It humbles me to see how everyone touches a life in there.

How is this type of peer partnering different from your other health-related relationships?

For me, this disease has become a full-time job. I’m in a clinical trial, I am in a transplant program at one hospital and being evaluated at another at the moment. That’s in addition to going to the gym to stay strong or to pulmonary rehab maintenance. I have to make sure that all my tests are updated so life becomes one big doctor’s appointment. The doctors, coordinators, nurses, technicians, etc. are all very nice and helpful, but there is nothing like being able to vent your frustration or talk about the excitement of “passing” a test to another patient. Someone who knows exactly what you are going through. It’s priceless, really.

What have been some of the challenges of starting a support group?

I’ve been lucky, the only challenge I’ve had is getting the facility to let us start a meeting. Once that was cleared it’s been a breeze. The Hospital for Special Care has been so very good to me. The Pulmonary staff is so caring and awesome to deal with. I became a Support Group Leader with the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF). They provide grants to start a group and educational booklets. Most importantly they provide support to the support group leaders. I’m told by other leaders that it’s a challenge getting presenters. I’m sure I will have that issue eventually but being a new group that hasn’t happened yet.

What do you enjoy most about it?

I truly enjoy seeing the patients and caregivers. The more patients and caregivers we have, the more family and friends we can educate. The more I get out of my own head and help others, the more emotionally strong and empowered I feel. Every time I see the number of people and new people who show up or even contact me I get emotional. Makes me realize how not alone I am.

Do you have any advice for others looking to start similar groups? 

Yes: Find a place, contact Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, and do it. There is definitely a need.

 

 

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