3 posts tagged “PatientsLikeMe research”

Are we really more likely to cry when watching movies on planes? New study de-mystifies the urban legend

Posted April 3rd, 2018 by

The Oscars have been awarded and spring travel is in full swing, which got us thinking about the urban legend that you’re more likely to cry watching a movie on a plane than on the ground. Is it just a myth or is there more to it?

While celebrities, polls and pop culture have covered the phenomenon — also jokingly known as altitude-adjusted lachrymosity syndrome (AALS) — no true scientific research has studied it. Until now.

An idea takes flight: The study set up

Paul Wicks, VP of Innovation at PatientsLikeMe, studies emotional lability, or uncontrolled crying and laughing, in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or motor neuron disease). But he’s also a frequent flier, and on a trip back from an ALS conference found himself a little weepy while watching Selma on a flight.

“Although I was studying this uncontrollable emotional expression in people with a medical condition, I thought maybe lots of healthy people might have uncontrollable, unexplained outburst of crying in certain settings, too.”

Enter the first scientific study on AALS. Wicks surveyed 1,084 people living in the United States who had watched a movie on a plane in the last 12 months. Participants answered questions about the films they viewed, whether they had consumed alcohol, if they’d watched any movies on the ground since their flight, and more.

The verdict: Frequent fliers aren’t always frequent criers

The study debunked the myth that we cry more on planes (25% of respondents reported crying while watching movies in the air vs. 22 % on the ground, a non-significant difference). Wicks was surprised by the results, but even more interested in some of the other unexpected takeaways…

Top takeaways

The most likely contributors to crying aren’t altitude or alcohol – it’s more about specific movies people are likely to choose on planes. Gender is also a factor, but Wicks says that could be because men are less likely to self-report crying at films. Here’s what else can increase your chances of tearing up:

A lot of it has to do with movie genre, too…

And if you pick these ones in particular, we hope you have tissues handy.

But in the end, it can be really personal, says Wicks:

“One mother reported that they took their daughters to see Wonder Woman and she cried not at the plot but to see the representation of a strong female protagonist for her daughters, and the feeling that her children were growing up with a better social culture than she did.”

Check out the full study results here, where you can also watch a video recap with Paul Wicks.

What’s your experience with crying on planes? What do you make of these study results? Share in the comments below.

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Defining “good” health care: 2 new studies reveal patient perspectives

Posted March 28th, 2018 by

Do you feel you’re getting the best possible care from your doctor? In two recent studies, PatientsLikeMe members answered this question and shared their perspectives on the health care they’re receiving. The results show that while patient opinions about care and provider performance vary according to condition, diverse patient groups agree on the top factors that define “good” care. Here’s the full scoop…

Poll results: Good care is harder to get for some conditions

Last month, 2,559 PatientsLikeMe members took part in a 6-question poll about doctor-patient relationship and what it means to get “good care.”

The results suggest that patients with certain conditions, especially those living with fibromyalgia, PTSD and MDD, are less satisfied with their care.

The poll also found that patients with these conditions are less likely to:

  • Believe their provider has fully explained treatment options. Just 47% of fibromyalgia and PTSD patients and 53% of MDD patients agree their provider has done so, compared to 63% of patients living with ALS, MS and Parkinson’s disease.

  • Report that they are receiving the best possible health care for their condition. Only 40% of fibromyalgia patients, 49% of PTSD patients and 45% of MDD patients believe they are receiving the best possible care, vs. 66% of ALS patients, 61% of MS patients, and 57% of Parkinson’s disease patients.

  • Change providers even though they think they are not receiving the best care or effective treatment. More than half of these patients (53% of PTSD and 56% of MDD and fibromyalgia patients) have stayed with a provider in this situation vs. just 31% of ALS patients and 36% of MS and Parkinson’s patients.
Why is this the case?

“A positive or negative experience with care could be provider-related, but also related to the fact that patients living with ALS, MS and Parkinson’s often have access to condition-specific specialists or centers of excellence while those living with other conditions do not,” said Sally Okun, PatientsLikeMe’s VP of Policy and Ethics. “This makes it even more important that patients advocate on their own behalf to ensure all avenues to get good care are being used.”

See the full poll results at news.patientslikeme.com.

The patient definition of “good care”

Prior to the poll, more than 200 people (including PatientsLikeMe members, clinicians, researchers and more) shared how they define good health care and what matters most to them, from taking an active role in their care to accessibility and cost. PatientsLikeMe researcher Emil says, “Now more than ever we need to pay attention to that patient role.” In this video, he breaks down the key study takeaways:

 

Are you getting the best possible care? 10 Ways to tell

Based on what the study uncovered, we turned the 10 major factors that define good health care into a check list. Speaking about the poll and the survey, Sally Okun says, “These complementary studies give a snapshot of what is most important to patients, and give patients the tools to find providers willing to meet the characteristics of good care.”

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