3 posts tagged “patients at work”

Patients at work: Member Nancy on being her own boss

Posted January 10th, 2017 by

We recently launched a blog series about patients who’ve started (or are gearing up to launch) their own businesses, sparking a discussion around how to manage your health without giving up on your career goals.

Say hello to Nancy (@spicerna), who sat down with us to discuss how she finds a balance between living with bipolar I and expressing her creative side through her art. Nancy chatted with us about the kinds of projects she likes to work on, and why it’s important for her to be her own boss: “I need a job where I am the boss every day. There is an unpredictable nature about the illness…not a day that goes by to where I am not making judgment calls to maintain my health.”

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your diagnosis experience?

I have struggled with symptoms of Bipolar I, since I can remember. I really noticed the ups and downs in the teen years. And at age 16, I had my first psychotic break, (1 out of 5 breaks in my life.) I have always been an overachiever and had big dreams and goals for the future but the combination of everything that I needed to succeed broke me. My body and mind couldn’t handle it. There was never a balance of my life. I never took a break I was a workaholic. I slept just 3-4 hours a night most nights. I had as many successes, as I did years of crash and burn.  It was just hard for me to work a mainstream job. I can’t do deadlines very well, stress triggers Mania. I was in complete mania working a full-time job and going to school for 7 years of my life then in a complete depression for 8+ years as I worked each day to recapture my life. Since I had 5 times of extreme psychosis. It wears on your body. I just had to begin plans to do a 180*. I was choosing the path to the most resistant and not enjoying the ride along the way. There were many things that I was doing wrong. I needed the balance, peace of mind; love for myself and to not live in extremes.

I have a certificate in residential planning and I planned on having a career in kitchen and bath design but that is high stress and the 180* was to find that my hobbies and being an artist is more of a goal and where I should be headed now. If I could make that work and market it to make some income. Then I can kill two birds with one stone I could have my success and support myself and take care of my illness at the same time.

I need a job to where I am the boss every day there is an unpredictable nature about the illness there is not a day that goes by to where I am not making judgment calls to maintain my health. I have to take many brain breaks clear my mind. That gets in a way of a full time every day job.  So to work at my own pace is crucial. So I can work around my mind.

How did you first get into making art? What are some of your favorite projects?

I started cross-stitch at age 8 at the same age I would draw in 3rd grade floor plans of my favorite houses that we vacationed at. In high school I took drafting class. I was very into residential homes and design. Through school I loved anything design and art related and at age 12 I determined that would be my life goal, I wanted to get into homes and design the plans for them. Well that idea evolved and now the goal is to be an artist and create art for people’s lives. It took a long time to make that distinction. I guess that is part of the process of the journey.  My cross-stitch was an obsession growing up. I made over 45+ pictures most of them were gift to friends. By working with my hands and heart it was a release to use the needle and thread, very healing. Then after a while after I chased after my career for a while I realized that I wanted to get involved with other mediums so with no money for school I began to teach myself using YouTube for advice other mediums, to illustrate for cards and create paintings. Wherever my ambition will lead. I am interested in paper, wood and fabric. I am defiantly in the experimental stages, working on many different projects to see where that may lead.  Right now, I am drawing and gravitating towards architectural element and gardens.  The sky is the limit.

Where have you been able to sell your art so far? What are your plans for growing a business out of it in the future?

I was making and illustrating some cards for people around me I would go to market and sell my cards just for the experience and wow they sold like hotcakes and had some people pay $10 for one card and there were orders for batches of 12 cards for Christmas and finally I just got warn out with all the work and found better ways to market my cards. I have one idea to sell and make good money buy illustrating my cards then making copy’s at the printers then selling or making silhouettes on the Internet for Cameo cutting machine sell the rights to the company and then when people buy my silhouette on the web I get paid a percentage I liked that idea. All of this is going to take me a long while to manifest I am becoming an expert in my own field so I am gauging down the road. 

How does living with bipolar affect your creative process?

When I am in mania my mind is racing the world it is so much deeper and broader and I have so many ideas. I have so many ideas but there not concrete. On the meds I struggle with similar issues as in mania; plus to focus, concentration, comprehension, low energy. I do think clearer on the meds but the symptoms never go away. It takes much strength to break down and be in the mood to do art so I am surprised when I look over my work and see so much progress.  So maybe once a day do a little bit. It is hard when your mind is choreographing dance songs in my mind and you know how to make that happen but all the details of the work and learning everything to piece that together. I don’t have energy for that. But it goes through my mind. All I know I can do anything I set my mind too there is just isn’t enough time for it all in this lifetime. Sometimes I think that I have the illness to keep me down to earth instead of a balloon flying off into the universe I have so much internal power.

On the flip side, does the process of making art help your manage your health?

Art is passion: it is metaphysical and spiritual. It takes you places. Color, and creating: helps release your mind. It keeps me occupied, during this life we call on earth.  It take’s skill and the process of learning, growing and creating that specific look is a life long job so fascinating to find.

I can manage my health by getting to a place to where I feel at complete peace and feel like I am doing my calling in this world. I feel depressed and moody if I am not doing that. I need Art in my life.

Do you have any advice for others with chronic illnesses who wants to start their own creative businesses?

Do it for fun first for years then add the buying and selling part. That is what I am doing? I feel more prepared to sell my work that way. Do your research about the business end and start with small classes to help you understand the business world. Become and expert first and then the process will be less stress on you. Owning a Business is a risk and you want to do what you can to succeed.

Most of all love you and have some faith. There is power within your heart that is just waiting to break through. Believe in that every moment of every day. Love yourself first and foremost and love others around you. Give to them in increases the harmony. Don’t get trapped in the hole of oppression and burden, get out!! Then you can succeed in all area of life and be ready for your own business.

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Patients at work: Member Jenny launches online craft shop on Etsy

Posted November 8th, 2016 by

 

A few weeks ago, we kicked off a new blog series about patients who have started (or are working on launching) their own businesses. We’ll be featuring some enterprising members and learning more about how they manage their health and their career goals at the same time.

Today, we’d like introduce Jenny, (jhound), a member of the bipolar community who recently opened an online shop on Etsy called OldSchoolJenny. Jenny designs cards, scrapbooks, printable journal kits and other paper crafts with a vintage flair.

When we caught up with her, she shared about her diagnosis experience, her creative process and the health benefits of working with a passion: “Having my Etsy business gives me reason to keep going. It gives me a sense of purpose and it also brings me a lot of joy. “

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your diagnosis experience?

I grew up in Southern California in a foster home. I joined the military when I was 23 and met my husband who was also in the Navy in 2002. We lived in San Diego for the first five years of our marriage and moved to Michigan when we both got out of the service in 2006.

My first breakdown occurred in 2004 a year after we got married. I had a severe depression that involved some serious paranoid delusions (psychosis). I was hospitalized for over six weeks and then medically discharged. My initial diagnosis was major depressive disorder with psychotic features. Although I believe I had my first mania in 2005 while my husband was deployed, it wasn’t until I had a severe mania that included religious delusions in 2008 that I received my diagnosis of bipolar I with psychotic features.

I finished college after we moved to Michigan. I have a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in library and information science. At various points in my life I thought that I either wanted to be a counselor or a librarian but right now I am happy working on my Etsy business. My husband just graduated from Central Michigan University in May. We have recently relocated to Adrian, Michigan for his first engineering job.

We do not to have children at this point although it is possible that we may adopt in the future (you never know). However, we treat our dogs like our children. We have two basset hounds that we adore and who keep us very busy.

How did you first get into crafting and digital design? 

I have loved crafting all of my life. My favorite activities in school were always the artistic ones. I still look back with fondness on finger painting in preschool. As an adult I continued crafting when designing and constructing cards, especially for my husband, Chris.

I started a wedding scrapbook shortly after we got married but it took me several years to complete because I was such a perfectionist. It wasn’t until I bought a complete scrapbooking kit at a yard sale last summer that I was able to let go of the perfectionism and just let my creativity flow.

As for digital design, I had a copy of Photoshop that I used extensively while Chris was on deployment. Creating digital collages was one of my favorite ways to escape the loneliness I felt while he was away. Now I just love creating digital art journal pages for people to use in their crafts.

What are some of your favorite things you’ve made?

One of my most favorite things that I have made is a framed scrapbook page that I created for Chris’s graduation. It includes some of his graduation photos and some quotes from his family members about how proud of him they are. I think it came out very nice.

I also really like the Halloween junk journal that I made for my Etsy shop. It includes lots of vintage images that I found that all include black cats. I am attached to it because it is the first of hopefully many junk journals that I will be making.

Something else I made that I really like is a scrapbook that is “all about me.” I enjoyed documenting my life in this manner and I feel that it has become a keepsake for me.

What’s your creative process? What (or who) inspires you?

Inspiration strikes in different ways. Sometimes I am inspired by other people’s creations that I find on Etsy or on Pinterest. Other times I am inspired by positive affirmations and quotes. Sometimes I can just look through my materials and find a scrap of paper that inspires me. I am also inspired by vintage images.

What has been the most challenging part of starting your own business while living with bipolar?

I think it may be having my level of commitment waiver with my mood fluctuations. Having bad days when I feel uninspired and some days when I fear that having a personal business may be a mistake even though most days I feel grateful for the opportunity that it provides.

On your Etsy profile you say that your “biggest desire is to bring art into other peoples lives and to inspire others to live their best possible life.” Can you talk a little more about this?

My initial projects involved positive affirmations because they inspire me/help me to think more positively. I was hoping they would help others as well. One of my goals is to make a mental health journal and other tools to help people with mental illness. I have seen some examples of mood journals, etc. on Etsy, but I plan on making mine not only functional but artistic at the same time.

How does your art affect your own life and your condition?

I feel that my art really helps me and helps my condition. First it helps me to stay positive and gives me something productive to do. Having my Etsy business gives me a reason to keep going. It gives me a sense of purpose and it also brings me a lot of joy. So far I have been very lucky in that I haven’t had to deal with a serious depression since opening my shop. I am hoping that when it happens I will be able to rise above and keep operating my shop. If not, it is very simple to put my shop on vacation and take a break if needed.

Do you have any advice for others with chronic illnesses who want to start their own creative businesses?

My only advice is to go for it. Don’t put it off until everything is perfect. It will never be the perfect time to start a business. Etsy is very inexpensive and it’s OK to make mistakes. I made some mistakes when I first started but it was all easily remedied.

If you do decide to go for it, my other advice is to use social media for marketing. Don’t just share information about your product but share information about yourself, too. People want to know about the creator almost as much as they want to know about the product, especially when it comes to creative work.

 

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