7 posts tagged “patient empowerment”

The power of your data: Patient empowerment

Posted December 14th, 2016 by

We’re more than halfway through 24 Days of Giving and we’ve been sharing how patient data has the power to create better communities, better care and a better you. So, while we’re on the subject of you – let’s talk more about how patients see themselves as the captains of their own health when it comes to care. That’s right: patient empowerment.

The results of a study we did a while back with our partners at Genentech have just recently been published in a scientific journal called “The Patient – Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.” What was this study about? Simple. It was about how finding healthcare information, interacting with peers and providers and access to healthcare contribute to your sense of empowerment as a patient with a chronic condition.

More than 3,988 of you participated. What was discovered? Check out some of the top takeaways:

Empowerment comes in two kinds:

  • Positive Patient-Provider Interaction (i.e., how favorably you view the care received from your healthcare provider)
  • Knowledge and Personal Control (i.e., how well you understand, manage and control your health condition(s))

Empowerment varies:

  • The average score on “patient empowerment” (on a scale of 15 – 75) was higher among patients with primary complaint of Parkinson’s disease (average = 62) and multiple sclerosis (average = 60) than those with fibromyalgia (average = 55) and chronic fatigue syndrome (average = 55).
    • Ooof, that’s barely English. Said another way, it appears that fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome patients feel slightly less empowered than people living with Parkinson’s or MS.
  • But across all conditions, those who were older, male, more educated and insured also reported significantly greater levels of empowerment.

What’s most important to you when it comes to empowerment?

For you, it’s important to:

  • be active in treatment goal setting with providers;
  • make sure that your provider spends enough time with you answering questions;
  • make sure that you understand the treatment and diagnosis, and any materials that are given to you; and
  • learn about and understand disease warning signs/symptoms, disease progression, and available treatment options. 

Knowledge is power:

How do you learn about your condition?

  • You use health websites like WebMD and Mayo Clinic (87%), PatientsLikeMe.com (60%), books (43%), magazines (40%), and journals (36%).
  • More than half of you get health information verbally from a doctor (59%).

What do you learn about your condition?

The information you find helps you learn about…

  • Treatment options (83%)
  • Course and progression of your disease (76%)
  • Signs and symptoms (68%)
  • Cause of condition (51%)
  • Initial diagnosis (50%)
  • Health monitoring (48%)

Doctor relationships:

  • Many of you are satisfied with your access to healthcare services (64%) and your relationship with your doctor (77%).
  • The majority of you (79%) feel like you have a say in your treatment decision-making, and are satisfied with the care you receive from your doctor (73%).
  • Some of you feel that your treatment goals don’t match your doctor’s plan (34%), or that you don’t spend enough time with your primary doctor during visits (36%).

Peer support:

  • For 47% of you, friends are a source of support and help care for and manage your condition.
  • Most of you manage your condition with help from others (74%) and learn from the experiences of those who are part of online communities like PatientsLikeMe (69%).

If you were one of the many who contributed to this research – thank you. What you shared proved that the differences in empowerment levels across conditions warrant further study. That’s the power of your data in action!

 

 

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#ChatActChange: empowered to chat, act and make change – together

Posted November 17th, 2015 by

On October 28, Sally Okun, our Vice President for Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety, participated in a Twitter chat – using the hashtag #ChatActChange – aimed at empowering people living with chronic conditions to advocate for policy change. Hosted by Diabetes Social Media Advocacy (DSMA), other chat participants included policy expert Susan Dentzer, Diabetes Hands Foundation and Novo Nordisk.

The chat generated some great conversation about what it means to be an empowered patient. 186 people joined the discussion, including patients, diabetes influencers and policy experts. 2015-2016 Team of Advisors member Christel, who is living with type 1 diabetes, took part in the chat, as did the American Diabetes Association.   

More than 500 users were reached with the #ChatActChange hashtag, and there were more than 1,154 tweets during the one-hour Twitter chat.

To check out a complete summary of the chat, take a look at this Storify. You can also contribute to the ongoing conversation on Twitter using #ChatActChange.

Let’s be empowered to chat, act and make change – together.

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PatientsLikeMe Names 2015-2016 Team of Advisors, Sets Focus on Redefining Patient Partnerships

Posted October 19th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, October 19, 2015—PatientsLikeMe has named 14 members to its patient-only 20152016 Team of Advisors and challenged them to work through an issue that’s central to everyone in the healthcare system: how to redefine patient partnerships. The team will be focused on rethinking what it means for patients to be partners, and on establishing new ways for the healthcare industry to connect with patients to deliver better care.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said that in an era when patients must be front and center in healthcare discovery and development, the group’s mission is vital to every patient, pharmaceutical company, regulator, payor and provider. “This advisory team includes some of the strongest patient advocates we have ever met. Their experience can empower other patients, and help those serving patients understand what it means to be a good partner. The team’s work will help create a stronger foundation for a more equal and participatory system of care.

More than 1,400 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. The nearly equal mix of men and women are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), bipolar II, cancer, Type 1 diabetes, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lupus, major depressive disorder (MDD), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and post traumatic stress (PTS). Members named to the team include: Christel Aprigliano, Craig Braquet, Jeff Demers, Cyrena Gawuga, David Gewirtz, Phyllis Marchand, John Michael, Gus Prieto, Laura Roix, Patti Sanner, Allison Silensky, Angela Stogner, Doug Thornburg and Peggy Zuckerman.

Christel Aprigliano is living with Type 1 diabetes and believes that the key to a good partnership is a focused, data-driven discussion on what matters most to patients. “Patient reported outcomes are crucial to the healthcare conversation. The more information we can share about what life is like for patients every day, the more questions we can ask each other, and the better we can help patients live well with the disease they have.”

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently kicked off their 12-month collaboration with PatientsLikeMe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and will convene several times in the coming months. This is the second Team of Advisors the company has formed. Last year, the inaugural group provided feedback to the research team and published a best practices guide that outlines new standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage patients throughout the research process.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


“Does anyone in healthcare want to be understood?” Sally Okun from PatientsLikeMe at TEDMED2013

Posted July 10th, 2013 by

It’s no secret that here at PatientsLikeMe, we think that the voice of the patient — your voice — is the number one way to drive medical advancements. At TEDMED 2013, our very own Sally Okun shared that message on one of the world’s largest stages. She asked the audience a very simple question. “Does anyone in healthcare want to be understood?” Check out the video to see Sally’s answer.

 

 


TEDMED 2013: Creating and experiencing wow!

Posted May 2nd, 2013 by

One word comes to mind when describing my recent experience at TEDMED 2013 – WOW!  Held annually at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., TEDMED is a conference unlike any other. For 3 ½ days you are immersed in the ideas and creativity of people from around the world who bring diverse perspectives to some of our greatest challenges in healthcare.

For me it was especially awesome because I contributed to the ‘wowness.’ I had the privilege of being a TEDMED 2013 speaker – in fact, I was the first nurse to ever take the TEDMED stage.

Screen Shot 2013-05-02 at 2.25.35 PM

My talk addressed the question “Does anyone in healthcare want to be understood?” At first glance the answer to this question seems obvious – “yes, of course we all want to be understood.” However, if you consider how many words used in healthcare are Latin or Greek, insider jargon or acronyms, the answer is not so obvious after all.

I reminded the audience that the language of health is missing the words and experiences of those we say are at the center of healthcare – patients. It’s time to move beyond the rhetoric of patient-centeredness to actually include the lexicon of patients in the language of health.

Lexicon

At PatientsLikeMe we have been doing just that for many years. We retain the words and phrases patients use to describe their symptoms and side effects while behind the scenes we match them to the words used by doctors and health professionals. With your help, we are creating the world’s first patient vocabulary.

By the end of my talk I offered the answer to the question “Does anyone in healthcare want to be understood? Yes, patients want to be understood.”

It’s time to humanize the language of health with the lexicon of patients.

Sally Sign off


Partnering with Patients to Improve Healthcare

Posted March 8th, 2013 by

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Partnering with Patients workshop, where PatientsLikeMe’s Health Data Integrity & Patient Safety Director Sally Okun, RN, MMHS, and PatientsLikeMe member Laura Phillips, who has multiple sclerosis (MS), shared the stage as co-presenters. It was a novel approach to incorporate a patient co-presenter into our presentation, and Sally reported that it made the experience quite special for her.

The day-and-a-half-long meeting brought together clinicians, researchers, policy makers, advocates, patients and caregivers—people who all care about creating better value and improving the quality of healthcare in the US. In the opening remarks by IOM Chairman Michael McGinnis, whose arm was in a sling, we were reminded that everyone is a patient at some point, but most don’t always have that mindset.

IOM Workshop - Sally and LadyMac

The meeting covered many topics, including the problems with healthcare that are complicated and hard to change. Coming from the PatientsLikeMe community team, the topic that struck me most was empowering patients to meaningfully participate in the decisions that affect them, such as which treatment to take or which doctor to see. There are many barriers to finding the answers, and we have a long way to go in making the answers more accessible, but I was happy to reflect on how our growing community of 180,000+ patients is already becoming more involved in their care by sharing their symptom and treatment data with each other.

Here were two other key takeaways from the workshop, as well as a look at how PatientsLikeMe is addressing each issue:

1. Patients need more information – and better information.

We heard that patients don’t have enough information, and they don’t know how to use the information they do have. Research articles are convoluted, access is limited, options aren’t presented; and as we heard from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient Kelly Young, who writes the blog RA Warrior, textbook definitions may not apply to everyone.

In contrast, our PatientsLikeMe community is sharing what’s normal to them, helping others interpret and digest research and creating a real-world database of what is actually going on with their health conditions. That way, members can learn the different treatment options and disease courses, discover the questions they haven’t yet thought about, and decide what’s right for them.

IOM Workshop - Sally and LadyMac from Right Side

2. The entire doctor/patient culture could use a tune-up.

There was a massive call for a “culture change” in many areas of healthcare, including the way clinicians and patients interact. Jeff Belkora from the University of Califormia, San Francisco, and his team of pre-medical interns shared how having an advocate can make a big difference in doctors’ appointments. For example, an advocate can help you define your questions, actually ask them in the office and be an active participant in making decisions about your care.

While some argue the culture change needs to come from both patients and clinicians, PatientsLikeMe members are already taking huge leaps in demanding to be heard. Members are sharing that it’s okay to fire your doctor, learn from others the right questions to be asking and arrive at doctors’ appointments with your own data in hand, including PatientsLikeMe’s handy Doctor Visit Sheet.

Overall, it was great to see so many people focused on making healthcare better, and that all of these various groups are looking to other consumer models for best practices. I truly felt that the workshop attendees were dedicated to listening—and finding new ways to listen—to families and patients in the name of better care.

What did PatientsLikeMe member Laura Phillips think of the IOM workshop?  Check out her take.

PatientsLikeMe member emorgan


PatientsLikeMe Update: May 2007

Posted May 15th, 2007 by

This month is momentous because we’re celebrating a major milestone at PatientsLikeMe. We now have over 1,000 PALS in our community. Thank you for making PatientsLikeMe your home and spreading the word to other PALS. The more patients we have, the more we learn from each other.

We are also thrilled to announce the debut of two new communities for Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). If you know people with either condition, invite them to join PatientsLikeMe. We want them to know what you’ve already learned – that when patients share their data, it empowers everyone.