3 posts tagged “National Institute of Mental Health”

It’s time to recognize mental illness in October

Posted October 6th, 2014 by

Think about this for a second; according to the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) 1 in 4 people, or 25% of American adults, will be diagnosed with a mental illness this year. On top of that, 20 percent of American children (1 in 5) will also be diagnosed. And so for 7 days, October 5th to 11th, we’ll be spreading the word for Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW).

What exactly is a mental illness? According to NAMI, A mental illness is a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. [They] are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life.”

There are many types of mental illnesses. The list includes conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar II, depression, schizophrenia and more. MIAW is about recognizing the effects of every condition and learning what it’s like to live day-to-day with a mental illness.

This week, you can get involved by reading and sharing NAMI’s fact sheet on mental illness and using NAMI’s social media badges and images on Facebook, Twitter and other sites. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #MIAW14 if you are sharing your story online. And if you’re living with a mental illness, reach out to the mental health community on PatientsLikeMe – there, you’ll find others who know exactly what you’re going through.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for mental illnesses.


Dispelling the myths of schizophrenia

Posted May 20th, 2014 by


May is all about mental health awareness, and we’re continuing the trend by recognizing Schizophrenia Awareness Week (May 19 – 26). Schizophrenia is a chronic neurological condition that affects people’s sensory perceptions and sense of being, and it’s time to dispel the myths about the condition.

Here are some myths and facts about schizophrenia from Northeast Ohio Medical University:1

Myth: Everyone who has schizophrenia knows that they have an illness.
Fact:  Many people who have schizophrenia wait months, sometimes years, and suffer needlessly before a proper diagnosis is made and treatment begins.

Myth: People with schizophrenia are dangerous.
Fact: Studies indicate that people receiving treatment for schizophrenia are no more dangerous than the rest of the population.

Myth: People with schizophrenia have split or multiple personalities.
Fact: Schizophrenia is not a split personality disorder in any way.

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) states that schizophrenia can cause extreme paranoia, along with mental changes like hearing voices others cannot, feeling very agitated or talking without making sense.2 Schizophrenia affects men and women equally, and although it’s normally diagnosed in adults over the age of 45, it is also seen in children. There is no cure for the condition, but antipsychotic drugs are used to manage the symptoms of schizophrenia, and many PatientsLikeMe community members are donating data on their treatments. Check out the NIMH’s fact page on schizophrenia to learn more.

Over the next week, many organizations across the U.S. will be raising awareness for schizophrenia through different events. Here are a couple examples:

If you’ve been diagnosed, you’re not alone – hundreds of PatientsLikeMe members are living with schizophrenia, and they’re sharing their stories in the forum. Take a moment to connect with others who are experiencing schizophrenia in the same ways as you.

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for Schizophrenia Awareness Week.


1 http://www.neomed.edu/academics/bestcenter/helpendstigma/myths-and-facts-about-schizophrenia

2 http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/index.shtml