5 posts tagged “Lung Cancer Awareness Month”

Speaking out for Lung Cancer Awareness Month: “We’ve got to get rid of the stigma”

Posted November 14th, 2017 by

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and we’re sharing members’ encounters with stigma and the automatic association with smoking. Lung cancer rates are increasing among nonsmokers, and some members of your community are raising their voices. One concern? The assumption that lung cancer only affects smokers could delay diagnosis and treatment for anyone (especially never-smokers) with symptoms. Some say that stigma also affects funding for lung cancer research.

Lung cancer rates rising among nonsmokers

As many as one in five people who die from lung cancer in the U.S. every year do not smoke or use any other form of tobacco, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). “In fact, if lung cancer in non-smokers had its own separate category, it would rank among the top 10 fatal cancers in the United States,” the ACS says.

Two studies presented at the 2015 World Conference on Lung Cancer showed that lung cancer rates among nonsmokers (especially women) have been increasing over the past decade.

The ACS says that avoiding or quitting tobacco use is still the most important way people can reduce their risk for lung cancer, but researchers have found several other causes or risk factors, including:

  • Radon gas
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Cancer-causing agents at work, such as asbestos and diesel exhaust
  • Air pollution
  • Gene mutations (as PatientsLikeMe Researcher Urvi recently pointed out, some of the latest clinical trials for lung cancer are looking at the role of genetic mutations)

Member Donna on stigma (even in doctors) and raising awareness

Member Donna (LiveWithCancer) was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer in 2012 and outlived her poor prognosis. She says she’s trying to raise awareness of lung cancer among nonsmokers and advocate for more research as a way to honor the memory of those who’ve died.

“I was a former smoker but I had quit before I was diagnosed, and it is absolutely heartbreaking to me how many [non-smoking] people were missing the diagnosis because even doctors — many doctors — still have the attitude that smoking is the only cause of lung cancer,” she says. “I’ve lost 20-year-old friends to lung cancer that were never around cigarette smoke at all, even as secondhand smoke.”

Donna says that a person with an unexplained cough and a history of smoking, like herself, is more likely to get a CT scan checking for lung cancer than someone who has not smoked but has possible symptoms.

She has a friend who was in his 40s and was a cyclist who biked “many, many miles every week” and started experiencing unexplained symptoms.

“He never, ever smoked and so it took the doctor a long time to finally look at whether perhaps his lungs had an issue,” she says. “And on his medical records, his wife told me, they wrote ‘patient claims he never smoked.’ They could not even accept that he was telling the truth.”

Her hope in spreading awareness? “We’ve got to get rid of the stigma, first with medical personnel so that they won’t ignore symptoms, but then just among the public because people just … they’re just not nearly as sympathetic with somebody that’s got lung cancer as they are with somebody that’s got breast cancer or any other cancer, really.”

In the lineup of different kinds of cancer, smoking has the strongest link to lung cancer, but researchers say that it can cause at least 14 types of cancer (as well as heart disease). So concrete stereotypes like “smoking=lung cancer” and “lung cancer=smoking” are flawed — and there are many health reasons to quit tobacco use.

Member Jacquie on “putting stigma aside”

Member Jacquie (Jacquie1961), who’s part of the 2016-2017 Team of Advisors, has talked in the forum about how people’s first question when they hear “lung cancer” is “Did you smoke?” or “Do you smoke?”

While those questions used to make her mad, now she takes them in stride and tells people that she used to smoke but quit 17 years ago.

“First and foremost, you have to put that stigma aside and not be embarrassed because I wasn’t,” Jacquie says, noting that other environmental factors play a part in lung cancer risk, such as air pollution’s role in the surge of “non-smoking” lung cancer in China.

“I am pleased to see more attention lately on new breakthroughs for the treatment of lung cancer,” Jacquie mentioned in the forum in 2015. “I think that getting rid of the stigma that it is not just a smokers’ disease is the first step in getting attention.”

On PatientsLikeMe

Join a community of more than 7,000 people living with lung cancer. How are you observing Lung Cancer Awareness Month? What would you like the public to know about the disease and related stigma?

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Lung Cancer Awareness Month: An interview with member Clare

Posted November 23rd, 2016 by

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and to share some insight into what it’s like to live with this condition, we talked to member Clare (Riverdale). When she was diagnosed with non small-cell lung cancer, her husband was already living with prostate cancer. While supporting each other through chemotherapy and radiation, the couple has made an effort to eat healthy and keep up the active lifestyle they led before. Get to know Clare below, and see what she has to say about “the value of a loving mate” in her experience with lung cancer.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am 73 years old, grew up on a farm in Alberta. My father smoked a pipe and used to joke about turning the air blue. No one else in the family got cancer. I smoked starting at age 20 while studying for exams, trying to stay awake, then continued as people who smoked got a coffee break and those who didn’t smoke really didn’t get a break. I continued to smoke less than a half a pack a day till age 28, then thanks to Nicorette gum stopped easily, as did my husband. We are very physically active. I rode my bike several miles to my job — weather- permitting — as we have great bike lanes and didn’t live too far from the center of the city. We continued to ride daily after retirement for exercise and belong to the European Waltz Time Society for bi-monthly dancing.

You were diagnosed with lung cancer after going to the emergency room for severe back pain—what went through your head when you received the news?

I was glad to hear that my pain was not a heart attack and that my cancer had been detected in an early stage.

In your profile, you mention that your husband is living with prostate cancer. How has it been supporting each other while managing your own health?

I was so sick during my husband’s treatment with radiation that I did not support him much but he seemed to sail through. The staff at radiation called him the entertainer and the coffee shop he attended daily called him by name and had his coffee ready as soon as he walked in the door. Only once did he have to delay because he had to have a bowel movement and a full bladder each day prior to treatment. He still has prostate pain and takes pain meds for that but his PSA says the treatments were successful and every 3 months the bladder checks say he doesn’t have bladder cancer. All I can say is that without him I would be willing to die now. But he says he can’t stand the thought of being alone, and I worry about him for that reason.

We noticed you regularly track your quality of life and symptoms on PatientsLikeMe. Have you seen benefits from tracking?  

I find it difficult to put in new things like a change in dosage of a medication, or if I want to mention my right breast is getting larger and nipple is painful. I have used it a few times to remember when an event happened.

What’s one thing you’ve learned in your journey with lung cancer that you’d like others to know?

Something I learned in my lung cancer journey is the value of a loving mate. Going through this alone, I would stay in bed and in misery but because of my mate, I eat properly, I exercise and he gets things done when I couldn’t manage. Maybe I would but because I don’t have to, things are better. Yesterday I spent the night worrying about pain in my tongue and wondering if a jagged filling was causing the sore. He called the dentist and I was taken right in and reminded about one of the side effects of Giotrif is mouth sores and to rinse with salt water. Alone I would have continued to stew instead of starting right away on treatment. That is why an advocate is so necessary.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.