3 posts tagged “light therapy”

Light therapy for depression: What is it, and how does it work?

Posted January 31st, 2018 by

Bright light therapy is a treatment that’s become increasingly common for treating seasonal affective disorder, a condition that impacts many during the winter months. We sat down with our in-house research specialist to discuss light therapy – what it is, how it works and if it can help treat other types of depression in addition to seasonal affective disorder.

What is light therapy?

Light therapy, sometimes called blue light therapy or light box therapy, involves sitting or working, for a prescribed amount of time, near a device that gives off light that mimics daylight. It’s thought to ease symptoms of depression by impacting brain chemicals linked to mood and sleep.

Light therapy effectiveness: What the research says

While additional studies are needed to fully understand the role of light therapy, so far results from clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of this treatment on people with major depressive disorder (MDD) have been generally positive.

  • One study, involving 50 inpatients with severe MDD, found that when researchers combined the antidepressant venlafaxine with light therapy, recipients experienced “significantly lower HDRS depression scores” than those only taking the antidepressant. The HDRS (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) is a questionnaire that helps provide an indication of depression severity.
  • Another 8-week trial involving 122 participants living with non-seasonal MDD found that light therapy, both on its own and in combination with the SSRI fluoxetine, was effective and well tolerated in those who participated.
  • Another study found mixed results, highlighting the need for more research to fully understand the role of light therapy

It’s important to note that while these studies showed positive efficacy, researchers still don’t know what “dose” or duration of light therapy is best and for what variations of depression.

Results: What you can expect

Light therapy is unlikely to cure major depression, but it may ease symptoms, especially those related to the season, and might help you feel better. Here’s what some PatientsLikeMe members have said about using light therapy as a treatment:

Check out side effects, dosages and costs members have reported for this treatment.

Choosing a light box

Although you don’t need a prescription to buy a light therapy box, it’s best to ask your doctor or medical health provider if light therapy is a good option for you. Before beginning treatment, you should discuss whether you need to take any special precautions, and what type of light therapy box would best meet your needs so you get the most benefit and minimize side effects. You should also discuss how to introduce light therapy into your treatment regimen. Also, know that health insurance companies rarely cover the cost of this treatment.

According to the Mayo Clinic, a light box should:

  • Provide an exposure to 10,000 lux of light
  • Emit as little UV light as possible

Recommendations for using the light box typically include:

  • Use the light box within the first hour of waking up in the morning
  • 20-30 minutes is generally the recommended amount of time
  • Use at a distance of about 16-24 inches from the face
  • Eyes should be open, but not looking directly at the light

Things to consider:

  • Is it made specifically to treat seasonal affective disorder? Some lights are designed to treat skin disorders, make sure you’re selecting the right one for your needs!
  • How much UV light does it release? UV light can damage your eyes if used incorrectly. Light boxes used to treat SAD should filter out most or all UV light.
  • Is it the style you need? Light boxes come in all shapes and sizes – the effectiveness of light therapy depends on daily use so choose a product that’s convenient for you.

Light boxes are designed to be safe and effective, but they’re not approved or regulated by the FDA so speak with your healthcare provider to understand your options. Read more about things to consider before choosing a product here. Do you use a light box? Share your experience and advice in the comments for choosing a product.

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The Five Different Types of Psoriasis

Posted November 1st, 2012 by

A photo shared by one of our members, Lissa, who has plaque psoriasis and guttate psoriasis.  Click to read her story!

On Monday, we recognized World Psoriasis Day on our blog, and today we’d like to dig a little deeper into this lifelong autoimmune condition, which can cause skin lesions on almost any area of the body as well as psoriatic arthritis.

Did you know that there are several types of psoriasis, and that they can have very different presentations?  Here’s a quick primer on the five main forms, none of which are contagious.

Plaque Psoriasis
The most common form involves reddish lesions topped with silvery white scales.

Guttate Psoriasis
A fairly common form marked by dot-like lesions that are small, red and scaly.

Pustular Psoriasis
Involves blister-like lesions and intense scaling, often on the palms and soles.

Inverse Psoriasis
Characterized by very red lesions where the skin folds (e.g. armpits, groin).

Erythrodermic Psoriasis
A rare, painful form marked by red, swollen skin and lots of dead skin shedding.

See photos of each type of psoriasis here.

Advanced Search Options for Finding Psoriasis Patients with the Same Subtype, Condition Status, Number of Years Since Diagnosis and More.

If you’re living with a form of psoriasis, find others like you in our growing community of more than 4,800 psoriasis patients. On our Patients page, you can search by type of psoriasis, years since diagnosis, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score and more.We also encourage you to add your subtype(s) on your condition history page so that others like you can reach out and connect.

What treatments work best for your particular type – from light therapy to topical corticosteroids like clobetasol?  Trade notes and exchange support with those who can truly relate today.