18 posts tagged “Heywood”

#NotAlone: On PatientsLikeMe, no one is alone

Posted September 14th, 2015 by

Our co-founder Jamie Heywood calls it “the big idea my brother inspired.” A community of people learning from each other’s shared health experiences, connecting with people who get what they’re going through, and tracking their journeys to inform new research and help others understand what might work best for them. That is PatientsLikeMe, and that is what Stephen Heywood inspired.

Today, more than 350,000 members are part of the community, and through learning, connecting and tracking, they are #NotAlone.

Over the next few weeks, we’re launching the #NotAlone campaign that’s all about how members continue to learn from and support one another through life-changing conditions.

What can you expect to see from #NotAlone?
We’ll be featuring some inspirational stories to show how members have felt less alone on their journeys. Here’s a preview into the #NotAlone experiences of Letitia, Nola, and Geof:

  • After Letitia learned about an epileptologist on the site and discovered she was a perfect candidate for surgery, she’s been seizure free for 3 years.
  • When Nola’s multiple sclerosis kept her from accessing her shower, Gary, a member she connected with in the forum, stepped in to help from 3,000 miles away.
  • Geof uses Adderall to combat multiple sclerosis fatigue, but, three days before his prescription was up, his insurance company denied the claim. He turned to the community and everyone who had tracked their own experiences with Adderall.

How can you get involved?
Share your own #NotAlone stories – whether in learning, connecting or tracking. Visit the forum to chat about your experience or chime in on Facebook or Twitter using #NotAlone.

And don’t forget to continue adding your data and experiences on the site. Every piece of information can help change medicine for the better and show someone else that they are #NotAlone.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


What can you do to challenge ALS in May?

Posted May 4th, 2015 by

It’s been 23 years since the U.S. Congress first recognized May as ALS Awareness Month in 1992, and while progress towards new treatments has been slower than we’ve all hoped,  a lot has still happened since then. In 1995, Riluzole, the first treatment to alter the course of ALS, was approved by the FDA. In the 2000s, familial ALS was linked to 10 percent of cases, and new genes and mutations continue to be discovered every year.1 In 2006, the first-of-its-kind PatientsLikeMe ALS community, was launched, and now numbers over 7,400 strong. And just two short years later, those community members helped prove that lithium carbonate, a drug thought to affect ALS progression, was actually ineffective.

This May, it’s time to spread awareness for the history of ALS and share everything we’ve learned to encourage new research that can lead to better treatments.

In the United States, 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS each year,2 which means that well over 100,000 have started their ALS journey since 1992. And in 1998, Stephen Heywood, the brother of our co-founders Ben and Jamie, was also diagnosed. They immediately went to work trying to find new ways to slow Stephen’s progression, and after 6 years of trial and error, they built PatientsLikeMe in 2004. If you don’t know their family’s story, watch Jamie’s TED Talk on the big idea his brother inspired.

So how can you get involved in ALS awareness this May? Here’s what some organizations are doing:

If you’ve been diagnosed with ALS and are looking to connect with a welcoming group of others like you, join the PatientsLikeMe community. More than 7,000 members are sharing about their experiences and helping one another navigate their health journeys.

Don’t forget to keep an eye out for more ALS awareness posts on the blog in May.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for ALS Awareness Month.


1 http://www.alsa.org/research/about-als-research/genetics-of-als.html

2 http://www.alsa.org/about-als/facts-you-should-know.html


Hacking our way to new and better treatments with integrated biology

Posted March 13th, 2015 by

When it comes to discovery and healthcare advancements, too many of us are more focused on the processes we use today rather than at a first principals level looking and what’s possible. We are a sector desperately in need of disruption to accelerate the generation of knowledge and lower the costs of developing new treatments for patients today. We need to ask what are the best ways to generate actionable evidence that can benefit patients, clinicians, payers and regulators.

We need to take an integrated approach to biology and treatment discovery.

Large-scale approaches like genetics, the biome, metabolomics, and proteomics are coming down in price faster than the famous Moors law that has driven computer improvements. These tools are beginning to allow us to understand the biological variation that makes up each of us. This is the technology I used at ALS TDI; the organization I founded, to help learn about the early changes in ALS. This emerging technology needs to be met with well-measured human outcomes.

PatientsLikeMe is working to build that network. Our goal is to be a virtual global registry with millions of individuals sharing health information, translated into every language and normalized to local traditions fully integrated into the medical system so it’s part of care and incorporates information from the electronic medical record, imaging, diagnostics and emerging technologies for interrogating biology.  We are doing this because to understand the biology of disease we needed to understand the experience of disease with the patients as true research partners.

This isn’t just about integrating biological methods to forge discovery. You can’t just consider the science; you also have to consider the person. No two health journeys are exactly the same. With integrated biology, you have to look at the whole person: their social interactions, socioeconomic status, comorbities, environmental impacts, lifestyle factors, geographical location, etc. To accurately model a condition like ALS, or any of the other 2,300 conditions that PatientsLikeMe members are living with, we need to understand everything that can impact progression. We need to use those real-world patient experiences to inform and improve the drug discovery process.

There is much that needs to be solved to move from our current siloed approach to the integrated one and we have had the privilege of being involved in one of the most innovative. Orion Bionetworks brought together leaders from across the MS Field to develop an integrated model of the disease and they are now moving forward with an even more ambitious project.

They’re using computational predictive modeling to bring together different scientific methods and big patient data to find treatments that work and biomarkers that measure them to the people that need them faster. Said differently, they are hacking their way to treatments, because that’s the only way it’s going to work.

They’ve already got a validated model: Orion MS 1.0. And now they want to develop a new Orion MS 2.0 model. Learn more about their #HackMS campaign and how you can help.

We are highlighting Orion here because what they are doing is so innovative and worthy of support. I donate to ALS TDI, the institution I founded, because I believe in the mission and their approach. I also have donated to Orion because if we need to do anything in discovery we need to support the people that are trying to do it differently. What they are proposing is so innovative and powerful in its scale that it has the potential to redefine how we understand and treat MS. That’s why we are partners with them and it’s how we meet our responsibility to our MS patients to use their data for good.

PatientsLikeMe member JamesHeywood

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


2014 recap – part II

Posted December 30th, 2014 by

2014 was full of new partnerships, research initiatives and PatientsLikeMe milestones (we just celebrated our 10th anniversary last week!), and in 2015 we’ll continue to put the patient first in everything we do.

At PatientsLikeMe
Everything we do starts with the community that shares their health data and experiences, which enables innovation and change in healthcare, for good. Here’s just some of what everyone helped accomplish in 2014:

  • We formed our first-ever, patient-only Team of Advisors to give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients.
  • Three new advisors were named to the Scientific Advisory Board for the Open Research Exchange (ORE), a platform where researchers design, test and share new measures for diseases and health issues. The board was formed in 2013 to lend scientific, academic, industry, and patient expertise to ORE
  • The community celebrated the sixth anniversary of PatientsLikeMeInMotion™.
  • We worked with Tam, a PatientsLikeMe MS member, to develop the first-ever patient led health measure for chronic pain on the Open Research Exchange. She’s going to start testing the measure in January and it will be available in the ORE library in 2015.
  • Data for Good launched in March topromote the value of sharing health information to advance research and underscore the power of donating health data to improve one’s own condition.
  • We followed that up with 24 Days of Giving in November, a month-long campaign to encourage patients to rethink how they donate health data. Garth Callaghan, a PatientsLikeMe member, kidney cancer fighter and author of Napkin Notes, shared his inspiration along the way.

Partnerships
We’re partnering up with even more people who believe in patient-centered healthcare. Here are some of the new friends we met in 2014 and are excited to be working with:

  • One Mind to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress (PTS) or traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both.
  • Actelion to create a new patient-reported outcomes tool for the rare form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma called MF-CTCL.
  • Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Eastern Regional Medical Center (Eastern) to help ease patients’ transitions from cancer treatment to survivorship.
  • LUNGevity Foundation, to help people diagnosed with lung cancer. LUNGevity will become the first nonprofit to integrate and display dynamic data from PatientsLikeMe on its own website.
  • USF Health to improve health outcomes for multiple myeloma patients. The partnership is PatientsLikeMe’s first with an academic health center.
  • Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare to better understand patients’ perceptions of compassionate care and strengthen the relationship between patients and their healthcare providers.
  • Sage Bionetworks on a new crowdsourced study to develop voice analysis tools that both researchers and people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can use to track PD disease progression.
  • Genentech (a member of the Roche Group) to explore use of PatientsLikeMe’s Global Network Access, a new service for pharmaceutical companies that delivers a range of data, research and tools to help researchers develop innovative ways of researching patients’ real-world experience with disease and treatment.

Out of the office
We’re always looking for ways to get out into the community and get involved out of the office, whether speaking to the FDA or simply helping out at a volunteer event. Here’s some of where we were in in 2014:

In the news
And here are some of the highlights from PatientsLikeMe in the media in 2014:

For more PatientsLikeMe media coverage, visit our Newsroom.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


The Theory of Everything

Posted November 6th, 2014 by

Between the Ice Bucket Challenge and movies like “You’re Not You” (about a classical pianist who is diagnosed with ALS), there has been a ton of awareness going on for ALS, with many efforts focused on the personal stories of people living with the neurological condition. And this month, ALS is being spotlighted again in a biographical movie coming out very soon.

“The Theory of Everything” is about the life of renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, who has been living with ALS since the 1960s. Despite being given a grim diagnosis, he defied all odds and became one of the leading experts on theoretical physics and cosmology. Stephen Hawking’s story reminds us of the reality of ALS, but is also an inspiration to all who are living with motor neuron disease.

The movie premieres on November 7th in the U.S. – check out the trailer below.

 

As many out there might already now, movies like “You’re Not You” and “The Theory of Everything” hit close to home for the PatientsLikeMe family. In 1998, Stephen Heywood, the brother of our co-founders Ben and Jamie, was diagnosed with ALS. Their experiences – as a patient, as caregivers, and as a family led to the beginning of the online community patientslikeme.com.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for ALS.


You’re Not You

Posted October 10th, 2014 by

There’s a greater sense of awareness around ALS lately. The IceBucketChallenge really shined a spotlight on a condition that many have heard of, but maybe not that many really understand. (If you missed it, see everyone here at PatientsLikeMe taking on the challenge, and what Steve, an ALS community member, thinks about it.

So it seems fitting that today there’s a new film coming out about what life with ALS is like. It’s called You’re Not You, and is based on the novel by Michelle Wildgen. Hilary Swank plays a successful classical pianist diagnosed with ALS. Emmy Rossum is also in the film as Bec, a directionless and brash young woman who becomes Kate’s full-time caregiver. This unlikely pair forms an intimate friendship and life-changing bond inspiring each other to live life to the fullest, while being brought together by the most challenging of circumstances. Through their unwavering support for one another, both women are moved to let go of who they were and discover who they are truly meant to be.

 

A special shout out and thank you to Hilary Swank, Emmy Rossum and Josh Duhamel for taking on the IceBucketChallenge, too!

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for ALS.


Jamie delivers keynote presentation at DIA 2014

Posted October 7th, 2014 by

Our co-founder, Jamie Heywood, recently traveled to San Diego to receive the Drug Information Association’s (DIA) 2014 President’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in World Health. With the award in his hand and speaking to everyone who was attending the event, he accepted it on behalf of the quarter million PatientsLikeMe members (this is for all of you!).

During the DIA’s 50th annual meeting, Jamie gave the keynote address, and he touched upon his personal journey in the world of healthcare and patient-reported data. He spoke about his brother, Stephen Heywood, who passed away from ALS in 2006, and how Stephen inspired the creation of the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALSTDI) and PatientsLikeMe. Jamie also shared about “healthspan” and the potential that personal health data has to change the way we look at treatments and research. But that’s not all – watch the video below to hear everything Jamie said.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Throwback Thursday: Jamie talks about the future of medicine

Posted September 4th, 2014 by

It’s Throwback Thursday, so today we decided to share a talk our founder, Jamie Heywood, gave at the Government 2.0 Summit back in September 2009. He spoke about how we can better answer this question for patients:  “Given my status, what is the best outcome I can achieve and how do I get there?”  Watch what else he had to say below:

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for good.


PatientsLikeMe (mid-year) news report

Posted August 8th, 2014 by

 

We’re halfway through summer here at the PatientsLikeMe Boston office, and it’s been a busy 2014 so far – from the launch of the Data for Good campaign to new collaborations with One Mind and Genentech. In case you missed anything, here are some of the highlights:

In the news

Innovators in Health Data Series: No Data About Us Without Us
(Health Data Consortium)

10 Lessons From Empowered Patients
(US News)

PatientsLikeMe Offers Three Services for Pharma and Researchers
(Applied Clinical Trials)

Speaking the Patient’s Language
(Hospitals & Health Networks)

Straight talk with…Jamie Heywood
(nature.com)

Social Media Site Connects Patients Suffering From Similar Illnesses
(KPBS)

A listening cure: PatientsLikeMe gives patients voice in clinical trial design
(TED Fellows)

For more PatientsLikeMe media coverage, visit our Newsroom.


Speaking up for hope during ALS Awareness Month

Posted April 28th, 2014 by

May is just a few days away, and we wanted to get a jump-start on spreading the word for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month. As many out there might know, PatientsLikeMe was founded on the life experiences of brothers Stephen, Ben and Jamie Heywood. In 1998, Stephen was diagnosed with ALS and his brothers went to work trying to find new ways to slow his progression. But their trial and error approach just wasn’t working, and so they set out to find a better way. And that’s how in 2004, PatientsLikeMe was created. If you don’t know the story, you can watch the feature documentary of the family’s journey, called “So Much So Fast.”

ALS is considered a rare condition, but it’s actually more common than you might think – in the United States, 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS each year, and as many as 30,000 are living with the condition at any given time.1 ALS affects people of every race, gender and background, and there is no current cure.

Even before PatientsLikeMe, Jamie started the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI), an independent research center that focuses on developing effective therapeutics that slow and stop ALS. Now, it’s the largest non-profit biotech solely focused on finding an effective therapy for ALS. And on May 3rd, “The Cure is Coming!” road race and awareness walk will be held in Lexington Center, MA, to help raise funds for ALS TDI. There’ll be a picnic lunch, cash prizes for the road race winners and live music. Last year, over $110,000 was raised for ALS TDI – if you’re in the neighborhood, join the race today.

Also, the ALS Association (ALSA) sponsors several events during May, and this year, you can:

Back in January, we shared a special ALS infographic on the blog – the PatientsLikeMe ALS community was the platform’s first community, and now, it’s more than 6,000 members strong. If you’ve been diagnosed with ALS, there’s a warm and welcoming community on PatientsLikeMe waiting for you to join in. Ask questions, get support and compare symptoms with others who get what you’re going through.

Keep an eye out for more ALS awareness posts on the blog in May, including an interview with one of our ALS members.

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for ALS Awareness Month

 


1http://www.alsa.org/about-als/facts-you-should-know.html


A new collaboration and the work ahead: An interview with PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and President Ben Heywood

Posted April 11th, 2014 by

Earlier this week, PatientsLikeMe announced a five-year collaboration with Genentech. Our goal? To bring your experience – the patient experience – to a company that wants to learn more from the people who are living with serious diseases, and to better integrate your insights into their decision-making as they develop new medicines. PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and President Ben Heywood talks more about the work ahead.

So, why Genentech? What do you hope to achieve through this partnership?

Genentech is a leading biotech company and an acknowledged leader in oncology (which is where our initial focus will be).

We spoke with their teams for quite some time before embarking on this collaboration and I have to say that we just really like their approach. We’re very much aligned in our goals of defining a more patient-centric approach to research, development, and care delivery.

Their goal in working with us is to explore the use of our PatientsLikeMe network to develop innovative ways of researching peoples’ real-world experience with disease and treatment. I think we also hope and expect this collaboration will encourage broader engagement of others involved in the delivery of healthcare to support a stronger voice for patients like you.

How does this differ from your other collaborations?

What’s different with Genentech is that we’ll be exploring on a broader scale how the use of our patient network might develop new ways to research the patient experience. The broader access should allow for more agile, real-time use of the data and help align the strengths of the platform with Genentech’s priorities. This collaboration also helps PatientsLikeMe expand our cancer community, and we’re excited to be partnering with such a leader in oncology research and development on that.

How does this move “put patients first?”

Genentech is a forward-thinking company that is continuously working to patients at the center of their decision-making. By providing Genentech access to the health data shared by the members of our network, it will help them learn more from patients like you and better integrate your insights into their decision-making as they develop new medicines.

Is the focus on cancer new for PatientsLikeMe?

We have a community of people with cancer that have been using the site since we opened it up to people with any condition in 2011; many right now list cancer as a secondary condition, although some list it as their primary. Part of this collaboration is about using resources to enhance the tools within our network to help make the site even more useful for cancer patients. Of course what we build for one community will benefit all, much like we’ve done all along. The end result is a website that better serves people’s needs.


Genentech and PatientsLikeMe enter patient-centric research collaboration

Posted April 7th, 2014 by

Companies Sign Multi-Year Services and Data Subscription Agreement
With Initial Focus on Oncology

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — April 7, 2014 — PatientsLikeMe announced today a five-year agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), to explore use of PatientsLikeMe’s global online patient network to develop innovative ways of researching patients’ real-world experience with disease and treatment. The agreement is the first broad research collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and a pharmaceutical company and provides PatientsLikeMe the opportunity to expand its patient network in oncology.

“We envision a world where patient experience drives the way diseases are measured and medical advances are made. Genentech’s leadership and commitment to this mission brings us closer to having patients at the true center of healthcare,” said PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood. “With Genentech we can now embark on a journey to bring together many stakeholders across healthcare and collaborate with patients in a new way.”

“At Genentech, we come to work every day with the goal of transforming patients’ lives. The collaboration with PatientsLikeMe will allow us to learn more from patients with serious diseases, and better integrate their insights into our decision-making,” said Bruce Cooper, M.D. senior vice president, Medical Affairs, Genentech. “We hope our participation will encourage broader engagement of others involved in the delivery of healthcare and support a stronger voice for patients.”

The five-year agreement provides Genentech the opportunity to utilize PatientsLikeMe’s Global Network Access, a new service for pharmaceutical companies that delivers a range of data, research and tools. The service includes:

  • Access to PatientsLikeMe’s network to enable cross-sectional research and broader discovery of patient insights.
  • Enhanced customized research services and capabilities.
  • Focused research projects to evaluate and develop new medical evidence, measures and standards of health.
  • Access to PatientsLikeMe’s clinical trial awareness tool, which allows patients to learn about clinical trials.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 250,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 40 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

About Genentech
Founded more than 35 years ago, Genentech is a leading biotechnology company that discovers, develops, manufactures and commercializes medicines to treat patients with serious or life-threatening medical conditions. The company, a member of the Roche Group, has headquarters in South San Francisco, California. For additional information about the company, please visit http://www.gene.com.


A New Year with Jamie Heywood

Posted January 10th, 2014 by

)

 

It’s 2014, and it’s a significant year for PatientsLikeMe and our members. Later this year we’ll mark the 10th anniversary of our founding. As we reflect on where we’ve come from and where we’re going, there’s one thing that has never changed—our commitment to make sure your real-world experiences are a central part of improving healthcare. 

Changing medicine for the better is a journey. This year, we want all of you to join us on that journey, every step of the way. That’s why we’re starting a new initiative to get even more patient-reported data. Co-founder Jamie Heywood talks about the idea of data donation, and all the good it can do.

 

 

Wow, ten years. That’s a long time. What do you think are some of the most significant accomplishments of the last decade?

It’s been an amazing journey. We started this site so people, including my brother Stephen, could find information that helps them live better day-to-day and contribute data to research. We wanted to shake medicine up, to make it more about the patient, to help people connect with each other and see what their options were and take control of their health. At the heart of that has been this underlying goal to make patient experiences matter. We thought we could create a site that would make people happy with features like forums or condition trackers, but also allow them to contribute to research every time they logged in. When we started out, that had never been done before. We took a giant leap forward in validating patient-reported health outcomes when we announced the results of the lithium study in 2011, which showed the efficacy of lithium carbonate on ALS. That was the first time patient-reported data collected via a website was used to evaluate a treatment in real-time and to refute the results of a formal clinical trial. Since then, everything’s changed. Now we’re hearing more companies in the industry talk about the patient voice and the importance of listening to it. Together with our members, we’re making them focus on what matters most—the patients.

You’re talking a lot lately about “donating your data for good.” What’s that all about?

We created a kind of public service announcement for our members and the general public to showcase the good your health data can do – for you, for others, and for research. The more patient data we can get into the hands of researchers, the more we’ll learn about how to improve treatments and care. Every time you tell us how you’re doing, or add information about a symptom or treatment to your profile, or participate in a survey, you’re telling researchers what they need to know about what it’s like to live with a disease. I’d love to see every member update the information in their profile every week. If you can do that, we can really make a difference. If you don’t, we wait – we wait for more and more people to take part in research studies, one study at a time, year over year. Some people with some conditions don’t have time to wait. Some people don’t want to wait. I think we can change that, but it takes a village. We’re all in this together, and the only way anyone will learn more and really make an impact on healthcare is if everyone pitches in.

What impact has member-reported data had on research to date?
A tremendous impact! Our research team has published more than 40 publications in scientific journals using the data and experiences that members share on the site. We started in ALS and took the patient voice to the forefront in that disease, highlighting under-recognized symptoms and, with the help of an inspirational ALS patient named Cathy Wolf, upgrading the ALS measurement scale. In MS, we’ve had strong partnerships with pharmaceutical manufacturers to help them develop better products and services that have been informed by patients. For conditions like fibromyalgia, mood disorders, and HIV, we have published findings on how the support of patients like you can have a therapeutic effect on improving outcomes. In epilepsy, we found that members who have made more friends on the site see better clinical outcomes, too. And we’ve helped change healthcare policy working with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and many other government entities. All of this fantastic work was made possible by the active engagement of our patients, the data they make available on their profiles, and their willingness to share openly to benefit one another.

What is your ultimate vision of what patient-reported data can do?

I think of PatientsLikeMe as a dynamic learning system, one that can learn in real-time from the experience of every patient in the world. We want that system to be with you as you and your doctor talk about your treatment plan, to give you the most current data to help you understand where you are in your illness, to draw on other patients’ experiences so that you can create the best path forward based on your goals. That’s the impact patient-reported data can have on every patient’s life, and why we need to get as much of it as possible.


PatientsLikeMe at the American Epilepsy Society Meeting 2010

Posted December 20th, 2010 by

AES 2010 boothEarlier this month, PatientsLikeMe was fortunate enough to attend the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society in San Antonio, Texas. We were there to spread the word about PatientsLikeMe to some 4,000 attendees including epileptologists (physicians specializing in the treatment of epilepsy), neurologists, nurses, and researchers. We had a great spot on the booth of our partner UCB, which featured a large display for us to show the site to conference delegates and answer any questions they might have. Some of the typical questions we got were:

  • “Is this free for patients to use?”   Answer: yes!
  • “How do patients record their seizures?”  Answer: they can very quickly and easily enter both the frequency and severity of each kind of seizure they had during the week
  • “Can I send you some patients?”  Answer: definitely!
  • “What kind of research can you do with the site?”  Answer: stay tuned…

We were also there to present a poster comparing our data to another large data set, the Pharmetrics insurance claims database. Now, we know reading about statistics isn’t the most thrilling of subjects, but the idea was to answer another important question we hear all the time: “How biased is your community?” Biases are important because they affect the quality of the research you can do and the conclusions you can draw from your findings. In our case, an early comparison of our data against a claims database suggests that our community members are more likely than the wider epilepsy population to be:  i) female, ii) in their 30s-40s (more people tend to experience their first seizure either in infancy or old age), and iii) on multiple medications to treat their seizures (“polytherapy”). We want to be transparent about understanding our biases and sharing them with the world, so you can click on the poster below to see the exact findings we presented.

aes2010-poster-thumbnail1

The conference was also a great opportunity to meet other leaders in the online epilepsy space, such as our friends at CURE Epilepsy.org, Epilepsy.com, Seizuretracker.com, and to meet with researchers from an exciting online project called the “Managing Epilepsy Well Network.” In many ways epilepsy is leading the way in online resources and we hope next year we might even convene a special meeting for us all to share ideas on the best ways to help this important patient community.

Our last opportunity to spread the word about epilepsy fell upon our Chairman and Co-Founder Jamie Heywood.  He spoke to some of today’s leading epilepsy doctors in the world about how we can help patients answer the question: “Given my status, what is the best outcome I can hope to achieve, and how do I get there?”

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks PatientsLikeMe member AMGraham