3 posts tagged “helpful tips”

13 spring cleaning + laundry hacks when you have a health condition

Posted April 5th, 2018 by

Pain, fatigue and other symptoms can make spring cleaning and household chores… stink! We’ve rounded up some tips, tricks and life hacks for cleaning and doing laundry when you have a health condition.

1. Make a plan. Write out your cleaning to-do list (or find a free printable one online) and tackle your top priorities first. Pace yourself, even if it means spreading your chores out over several days or weeks. Think of spring cleaning as spring/summer cleaning – no rush.

2. Set time limits. Chelle Iredale, a writer for The Mighty who’s living with fibromyalgia, knows her cleaning limits: “15 minutes is a good amount of time for me,” she says. “Do what you can in that amount of time, then take a break. Re-evaluate how you’re feeling after each chore so you don’t overdo it.” Try to squeeze in some quick scrubbing or dusting sessions during TV commercial breaks.

3. Become a “no shoe” household. So what, if a few guests grumble? This rule will cut down on dirt. “When it comes to your health, do what’s best for you – not the masses,” Chelle says.

4. Pick products that make cleaning easier. It might be time to retire that ol’ mop and broom, writes Justina Bonilla, another Mighty contributor. Time-saving products like cleaning wipes, disposable dusters and wet mops can work wonders. You can even buy dust mop slippers and microwave steam cleaners these days. Also, shop online for cleaning supplies so you can take stock of your current stash and remember what you need.

5. Make things fun and comfortable. Listen to music. Or a podcast. Or an audio book. Anything that entertains or motivates you will make your cleaning session a little better, Justina says. Also, try to stay as comfy as possible by doing some chores sitting down (such as cleaning the kitchen table or wiping floor boards) and using a padded surface (think: garden kneeling pad or thick yoga mat).

6. Give into the urge to purge. Spring feels like a new beginning, which can make it a little easier to part with old clothes and clutter. Go with it! Less stuff = less work. While you’re at it, ditch some of your baskets and bins where junk mail and unworn shoes pile up.

7. Ask for help. Know someone who loves to clean and declutter? Time to phone a friend! And next time your birthday or the holidays roll around, consider asking for gift cards for a cleaning service or a new gadget (think lightweight or robo-vacuum) that’ll make cleaning easier.

Bonus: 6 laundry shortcuts! The Mighty recently shared a list of 24 laundry hacks for people with chronic illness, and here are a few favorites:

  • Skip the hamper — leave the washing machine lid open and ask everyone in your household to put dirty clothes straight in the washer at the end of the day.
  • Invest in a “grabber” to pick up dirty clothes off the floor.
  • Set a stool or folding/camping chair near the washer/dryer to sit on and help prevent fatigue.
  • Rather than sorting by color, sort into two baskets: one for pants, and the other for tops, socks and underwear — which makes for easier sorting/folding later.
  • If you have closet space, quit folding and hang everything on a hanger.

Got any tried and true tips for tackling chores with a health condition? Join PatientsLikeMe today to connect with others and swap ideas like these!

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Living with a mental health condition? See these helpful pointers for your next job interview

Posted March 19th, 2018 by

Unsure of how to navigate that job interview? You’re not alone. Members have exchanged their experiences and strategies here on PatientsLikeMe — from worrying about how to control nervous twitches to advice about not oversharing. Read on for more info about what you need to disclose to your potential employer, and hear how other members get through their interview jitters.

To disclose or not disclose? Sharing your mental health condition

“I’m damned if I’m open about it, and I’m damned if I try to hide it,” writes a person living with schizo-affective disorder in this Fast Company article. Weighing whether to disclose your condition and risk not getting the job against the stress of hiding a condition while performing a job isn’t easy. But Art Markman, PhD, professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, offers some guidance:

While you don’t have to disclose your mental health condition during the interview, Markman recommends that you should at some point set up supports at work for success. To get protection under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), you must tell your employer about your condition to get accommodations before there are any issues. This also enables your employer to structure your job in a way that might reduce stress.

Remember to breathe

Shana Burns, contributor to The Mighty advises dealing with anxiety you might have ahead of an interview by focusing on your breath:

“In through the nose, out through the mouth, count to 10 and slow everything right down. You are tingling because you are breathing too quickly, slow it down, and it will stop. This is a temporary feeling. It will not last forever.”

Burns adds, “Remember that you are OK; distract yourself — however you need to distract yourself, do it, and be kind to yourself.”

4 interview tips from PatientsLikeMe members

1. Overdressing is OK, but try not to overshare

“I have a Doctorate degree in Education. …I tend to want to overshare thinking it will make the interviewer realize that I know a lot about the subject or position. Oversharing things about myself frustrates my friends and family but at least they understand why…. I’m just trying to connect, but it is so out of [whack].”

“I have visible tattoos and piercings. I’m willing to remove a piercing while working if I have to. My tattoos are on my wrists…I plan on wearing long sleeves to the interview.”

2. Gaps in your resume? Practice what you want to say about your work history ahead of time

“I guess it’s a fine line between saying too much and just coming off as smart and enthusiastic…I always have too little to say. In my interview on Monday, the first thing they asked was ‘why aren’t you working up to your education?’ That, and gaps of time off due to illness, make a decent resume look suspicious to employers. I stammered something about ‘illness’ but should have been more prepared. Role playing is a good idea, at least for those painful questions. And I just have to keep doing it (ugh)…”

  • Tip: Speaking of preparing for tough questions, The Muse provides some common interview questions and coaching to how to answer them.

3. Show your interest in the company and the job

“Eye contact is very important. Smile. Sell your good points, you have many.”

“Learn a little bit about the company before going into the job interview (“I learned a little bit about the company going into the job. For example, I worked at Victoria’s Secret. So I learned what my favorite part about the company was. You can be a little cheesy and say things like ‘I love that _______ store remembers its audience. It’s a strong quality of this store to have sizes and styles for every shape.'”)

4. Come with questions (even simple ones)

“Have a question or two prepared for when they ask ‘So do have any questions for me?’ That shows that you are truly interested. They can be simple like what is the dress code or roughly how many hours will you work a week.”

What has your job interview experience been like? Do you have any helpful tips to share? Log in or join PatientsLikeMe and jump in the conversation.

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