14 posts tagged “heart disease”

Keeping it fresh for heart health month

Posted February 7th, 2017 by

Did you know February is Heart Health Month? And although heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in America, it’s also one of the most preventable diseases. In the spirit of heart health month, let’s raise awareness together – make healthy choices day-to-day, get to know your family health history and get regular check-ups to give yourself the best chance of staying healthy, longer.

Here’s something to get you started today – a tasty (and heart healthy) recipe from the American Heart Association.

 

Balsamic Glazed Fish

Ingredients

  • 4-4 oz fillet fish
  • black pepper
  • 3/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice

 

Directions 

  1. Heat Oven to 450 degrees.
  2. Season fish to taste with pepper. Place on a cookie sheet or in a 9 x 13 inch casserole dish and bake 10-12 minutes.
  3. While the fish cooks combine remaining ingredients and whisk well. Microwave covered on 50% heat for 2 minutes, stirring half-way.
  4. Drizzle glaze over fish and serve.

Know of any other delicious and healthy recipes you can share? Let us know in the comments or join the discussion in the forums.

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Food for Thought: A heart-healthy recipe for Heart Month

Posted February 22nd, 2016 by

 

February is Heart Month, a time to raise awareness for the leading cause of death in Americans: heart disease. Healthy eating can lower your risk for heart problems, so for this edition of Food for Thought, we’re sharing a recipe from the American Heart Association. Give this Thai chicken soup a try — it’s is both heart-smart and tasty.

     

Slow Cooker Thai Chicken Soup

  •  2 lb. boneless large chicken breasts
  • 14.4 oz. packaged onion and pepper stir-fry mix
  • 16 oz. packaged white mushrooms
  • 1/2 (13.5-ounce) can lite coconut milk
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken stock
  • 2 Tbsp. lime juice
  • 1/4 tsp. red hot chile flakes
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 10 oz. packaged frozen peas
  • 1/2 cups fresh basil or cilantro leaves
  • 4 oz. raw rice vermicelli noodles, roughly chopped or broken
  • Asian hot sauce like Sriracha, to serve, optional

Directions:

  1. Place chicken into a large slow cooker. Add stir-fry mix and mushrooms. Pour coconut milk and chicken stock over the mixture. Cover and let mixture cook on high heat for 4 hours or on low heat for 8 hours until chicken is tender.
  2. Before serving, turn the heat to high if it’s on low. Use tongs to transfer chicken to a bowl. Stir lime juice, chile flakes, salt, pepper, peas, basil, and vermicelli noodles into slow cooker, making sure the noodles are mostly submerged in the liquid. Cover with lid and cook until noodles have softened, about 20 minutes.
  3. Carefully transfer hot chicken to a cutting board and cut into bite-sized pieces. Stir back into the soup. Ladle soup into bowls and serve with hot sauce, if desired.

Do you have a heart-healthy dish you like to make? Share it with the community!

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Get Pumped for American Heart Month

Posted February 7th, 2013 by

February Is American Heart Month

You’ve all heard this fact before:  heart disease (including heart attacks and heart failure) is the leading cause of death among American men and women, claiming around 600,000 lives each year.  But what are you doing about it?  Are you and your family working on the controllable risk factors that play a role in this largely preventable disease?

For example, how are you doing with these controllable risk factors?

Cholesterol levels
Blood pressure
Obesity
Diabetes
Tobacco use
Physical activity

During American Heart Month this February, it’s the perfect time to ride the momentum of your New Year’s resolutions and move towards a more heart-healthy lifestyle.  That means making small to large changes in your daily routine that really pay off.  From what you eat to how much walking you do, take stock of what you can control…and share your experiences with other PatientsLikeMe members.

Not sure where to start?  Use a BMI calculator to find out whether your Body Mass Index (BMI) falls within a healthy range.  Also, make sure you go in for an annual checkup this year, which will give you and your doctor a chance to look at your cholesterol, blood pressure and heartbeat.  That way, if there’s a red flag anywhere, you can start doing something about it sooner rather than later.

Also, it’s always a good idea to brush up on the warning signs of a heart attack – and how they may be different for men and women.  Here’s to keeping the blood pumping this year and many more!


Rediscovering Life’s Simple Pleasures: An Interview with a Heart Patient

Posted October 10th, 2012 by

Learn About World Heart Day 2012

Last week, we recognized World Heart Day on the blog and discussed why there is an urgent need for awareness about heart disease and stroke, the world’s number one killer.  We also talked about how heart disease can be an abstract concept until you are exposed to someone’s personal story.

That’s why we are pleased to introduce you to Alan, a PatientsLikeMe member who is living with congestive heart failure (CHF) following a heart attack.  A few years ago, he had a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) – or a battery-operated mechanical pump – surgically implanted to help his heart continue to pump blood to his body.  What has he learned from his experience, and what’s his lifestyle like today?  Find out that and more in our interview.

1) Tell us about your heart attack and how this journey began.

I suffered a heart attack some twelve years ago. While working in the yard one very cold afternoon I had “cold sweats” and a very sore throat. I started feeling better and decided to go to work the following day. Late in the morning of the second day I began feeling much worse and called my wife and told her she needed to pick me up and we should go to the hospital together. I told my wife and the triage nurse in the ER that I was developing pneumonia.

After a short time in the ER a technician came in and conducted an EKG. He immediately told the other personnel in the ER that I was exhibiting “tombstone T’s.” I was rushed to the Cath Lab and had a stent inserted into a vein in my heart. I never suffered any of the “classic” signs of a heart attack (crushing chest pain, pain in my arm(s), losing consciousness, losing the use of any extremity, etc.) Eight weeks after the stent implant I had open heart surgery (aorta valve, four bypasses, repair aortic aneurysms, etc).

2) What’s your lifestyle like today with your implanted LVAD?

Living with the LVAD has changed for the good and for not so good. I am somewhat limited in what I can do and not do, as opposed to my pre-LVAD life. There are activities I absolutely cannot do, and some I choose not to do. I cannot swim, bathe or shower without a special waterproof bag for electronics, fly the airplane we owned, drive fast cars and fast boats, hunt in the mountains, or bass fish in Mexico and South America. I have found that I can cook, watch grandchildren graduate from high school and college, watch great grandchildren come into the world and watch them grow and change.

3) What’s been the most unexpected part of your experience?

The most unexpected part of the heart disease journey was discovering that it did not take a club and a ball, a gun (shotgun or rifle), a rod and reel, flying an airplane, going off to fish and/or hunt, owning a fast car, etc., to be happy. Some of the other things I discovered were: vacations do not have to be long (distance and duration), they just have to be taken with someone you deeply care for, and who deeply cares for you; you discover which of your friends are sincere and true, and endeavoring to be a true and sincere friend in return; and many of the simple pleasures in life have been lost along the way in life’s journey.

Soaking in the Sunset:  One of Alan's Rediscovered Pleasures

4) What do you want others to know about their hearts?

Hopefully, even if it is only one person, what I say here might preclude that person from making the same misguided and poor decisions I made concerning diet, lifestyle, stress and the “things” it requires to be happy.


World Heart Day: Taking Prevention to Heart

Posted October 1st, 2012 by

Did your heart beat a little faster this weekend?  This past Saturday was World Heart Day, sponsored by the World Heart Federation.

World Heart Day 2012

Founded in 2000, this global event was created to educate the public about heart disease and stroke, the world’s leading cause of death, claiming 17.3 million lives each year.  What’s a major concern is that these numbers are rising.  By 2030, it’s expected that 23 million people will die from cardiovascular disease each year – which is more than the entire population of Australia. The main message of World Heart Day is that at least 80% of premature deaths from heart disease and stroke could be avoided if the main risk factors – tobacco, unhealthy diets and physical inactivity – are addressed.   That means that the way you live is inextricably tied to the health of your heart.

Children Are a Major Focus of World Heart Day

Children are a particular concern for the campaign as kids often have little control over their environment, lifestyle and food choices.  Unless families around the world prioritize a smoke-free home with healthy meals and regular exercise, the children of today are going to be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life.  How can you help today’s kids have a strong hearts and a healthy future?  Check out the Kids on the Move Toolkit and Superheart Cartoon Leaflet for Kids to learn how you can put together a customized program for your family, school or community.

Like many health conditions, heart disease may not cross your mind until a human face is put on the disease, especially a face that looks like you or your loved ones.  That’s why the World Heart Federation is collecting personal stories via short conversations in person or by phone.  If you’ve been affected by heart disease or stroke, learn how you can participate in this global project.  Your story can help both world leaders and fellow community members focus on heart health with greater urgency.  We also encourage you to exchange support and tips with PatientsLikeMe members who have experienced a heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, valvular heart disease or other cardiovascular conditions.

Speaking of individual stories, check out our interview with Alan, a PatientsLikeMe member who’s living with congestive heart failure (CHF).


How Heart Attack Warning Signs Differ in Women

Posted February 21st, 2012 by

A heart attack is unmistakable, right?  Not exactly.  And especially not if you’re a woman.

Elizabeth Banks in "Just a Little Heart Attack"

We kicked off February by recognizing National Wear Red Day and sharing a hilarious video created by actress Elizabeth Banks for American Heart Month.  In the short piece, a harried working mother begins having strange symptoms one morning, including tightness of the jaw, dizziness, nausea, shortness of breath, muscle pain and pressure on her chest.  Despite all of this, she remains more concerned about getting her husband and kids off to work and school, respectively.  Her son is the only one to recognize what’s going on, saying “Mom!  I think you’re having a heart attack.”

Part of 2012 Heart Month message is that the warning signs of a heart attack for women can be different than for men.  Unlike the stereotypical image of a man clutching his chest and falling down, heart attacks may appear less dramatic in women.  For example, a woman can experience a heart attack without severe chest pressure (“an elephant sitting on my chest”).  Also, women are somewhat more likely than men to report more subtle symptoms such as back or jaw pain, shortness of breath and nausea/vomiting.  The danger is that even when the signs are subtle, the consequences can be deadly.

The Key Statistic Behind This Year's American Heart Month

Would you be shocked to have a heart attack?  That’s what many women report – that they never thought it could happen to them.  As a result, they assume their discomfort must be something more routine like the flu, acid reflux or normal aging.  They also may downplay it in order to put their family’s needs first.  Don’t make this mistake.  A heart attack strikes someone every 34 seconds, and heart disease is the number one killer of women.  So if you think you or someone you love might be having a heart attack – even if the symptoms are subtle – don’t wait more than five minutes before calling 911.

Beyond knowing the warning signs, a little prevention (such as quitting smoking or walking just 30 minutes a day) goes a long way.  Learn your heart attack risk – as well as how you can lower it – with the American Heart Association’s Risk Calculator.


Are You Decked Out in Red Today?

Posted February 3rd, 2012 by

We are!  Check out the PatientsLikeMe team members who donned red items (everything from ties to scarves to dresses) in support of National Wear Red Day.  Here’s to increasing awareness of heart disease – the number one killer of women – in 2012.

The PatientsLikeMe Team Showing Our Support for Women's Heart Health

Stay tuned for more about cardiovascular health throughout February, which is Heart Month.  That means it’s time to not just draw and cut out heart shapes for your Valentine – but to think about the organ that pumps our blood and keeps us alive.


Wear Red Tomorrow for Women’s Heart Health

Posted February 2nd, 2012 by

Friday, February 3, 2012, Is National Wear Red Day

Did you know that heart disease kills more women than all cancers combined?  And that it’s largely preventable?

Now you do – and there’s something you can do about it.  Participate in National Wear Red Day® tomorrow, February 3, 2012.  Better yet, get your friends and co-workers to dig into their closets as well.  Together, you can make a vibrant, high-impact statement with your sea of red.

Another easy way to show your support is to “Like” the Go Red for Women page on Facebook.  Everyone who becomes a fan will receive a free red dress pin to wear every year for this important event.  Want to get inspired to do more?  Watch comedic actress Elizabeth Banks in the short film “Just a Little Heart Attack” below.

Learn more about the risks of heart disease in women here.  And if you’ve already been diagnosed with a cardiovascular condition – such as cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease or valvular heart disease – don’t go it alone.  Join PatientsLikeMe to share and learn with others like you.

National Wear Red Day® is a registered trademark of the American Heart Association and the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).


Battling the Complications: An Interview with Diabetes Patient Michael Burke (Part II)

Posted November 9th, 2011 by

Last week, in Part I of this interview, PatientsLikeMe member and blogger Michael Burke shared his sister Linda’s struggle with type 1 diabetes.  Today, we learn about his own type 1 diabetes journey, including his June 2011 kidney transplant as a result of diabetes-induced kidney failure.

1.  What diabetes complications have you faced?

PatientsLikeMe Member and Diabetes Blogger Michael Burke

Diabetes is a disease that appears to be misunderstood by most people, in that the consequences of the disease can lead to many different complications.  As I mentioned earlier, both Linda and I suffered from diabetic retinopathy…essentially, you can go blind from diabetes.  Another complication is nephropathy, or kidney disease.  For me, this led to kidney failure and the eventual need for a kidney transplant this past June.

Heart disease is another major complication.  Personally, I never knew that I had any heart disease until one day my primary care physician sent me for a routine stress test.  During the stress test, the cardiologist felt it necessary to immediately admit me to the hospital and do a cardiac catheterization the next morning.  When he did, he found two blockages in my right coronary artery – one was a 90% blockage and the other was an 85% blockage.  I then had several stents placed.  After two years, those stents were becoming ineffective, and I required heart bypass surgery.  Lucky for me, there was a heart surgeon in Boston who was doing bypass surgery robotically.  What this meant for me was a much smaller incision (about an inch and a half compared to the whole chest being opened up), and being a diabetic, less risk of infection and a shorter recovery time.

Another complication is [diabetic] neuropathy, or nerve damage.  Typically, this usually affects the feet, but other parts of the body can be affected as well.  As for Linda and I, the neuropathy is/was primarily in our feet.  For Linda, it was extremely painful, with the feeling that you are constantly being poked in your feet with something very sharp.  For me, the feeling has been quite different, in that there is no feeling, at least around my big toes, which in turn has caused some balance issues for me.  Neuropathy is serious, it’s not just that it is painful for some and a loss of feeling for others.  It can also lead to amputation of your toes, your foot, or in drastic circumstances, part of or all of your leg.

2.  What was your kidney transplant experience like, and how are you doing now?

I went through a whole lot of emotions over the course of getting this new lease on life.  Although I had been prepared by my kidney doctor over the last several years that I was most likely going to need a kidney transplant, the day I sat with the transplant team for the first time was absolutely frightening and surreal at the same time.  It’s hard to explain.

I just remember sitting with the transplant team and when the transplant doctor said, “Ok, we will put you on the transplant list within the next few days, and we will move forward,” my heart was pounding so hard I thought it was going pop out of my chest.  There is also a lot of anxiety that goes along with the whole transplant process.  At first, I didn’t know where the kidney would come from.  I knew there were family members who said that they wanted to be tested and now I was also on the national transplant list.

Michael Burke's Brother and Kidney Donor Tommy

When my brother Tommy was starting the testing process, I kept going back and forth in my head.  It would be great to have someone close to me donate, but then there was the guilt.  If I ever rejected their kidney now they are left with just one.  As it turned out, Tommy was a 5 out of 6 antigen match, and he donated his kidney to me in June.

I had often heard before the transplant that you won’t understand how badly you felt or how sick you were before the surgery until after the surgery.  That could not be a truer statement.  I never really felt sick before, and I have been told that is because kidney disease can be very slow and progressive.  However, looking back today, I can honestly say that there has been a 180 degree turnaround.  I have much more energy and I just generally feel well – it has been a huge difference, and I have Tommy to thank for that.

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Are you a diabetes patient as well?  In honor of American Diabetes Month, share your thoughts and stories at CallingAllTypes.com.


Medication Non-Adherence: The Costs and Complexities

Posted November 7th, 2011 by

On October 24-25th, PatientsLikeMe attended the 8th Annual Patient Adherence, Communication and Engagement (PACE) Conference in Philadelphia. The event focused on how the healthcare industry can deliver measurable improvements in patient adherence (i.e., taking medications as prescribed by your doctor).  Put simply, how can we help patients like you take the correct dosages at the correct times?

2011 Patient Engagement, Communication and Adherence (PACE) Conference

Why does this topic merit its own conference? Well, as we learned at PACE, medication non-adherence costs more than $300 billion every year in the US alone. You read that right. And this staggering amount is comprised of more than just hospitalization and emergency room costs. It also includes things like lost employee productivity and the cost for less optimal patient outcomes. Essentially, think of it as $300 billion the US could be saving each year – but currently is spending – in the midst of an economic downturn.

Here are some of the other noteworthy takeaways:

  • A key factor in non-adherence is that patients may frequently have an incorrect understanding or an unrealistic expectation from their doctor of what their medications will do for them.
  • Recently passed US legislation is attempting to change the way doctors are paid. The new law provides financial incentives for health plans to implement quality measures that hold doctors accountable for impacting patient outcomes.
  • Many new solutions, such as telemedicine and the patient-centered medical home, are being piloted and studied. The goal is to learn how technology can impact patient outcomes via medication adherence services and remote medical care.
  • To remain relevant to patients, biopharmaceutical companies now recognize that they must incorporate the voice and experience of the patient into their decision-making processes.

PatientsLikeMe Chief Marketing Officer and Head of Business Development David S. Williams III

Last but not least, our very own Chief Marketing Officer and Head of Business Development David S. Williams III spoke about the work PatientsLikeMe is doing around medication adherence. Specifically, he focused on patient-to-patient interaction as an influential driver of medication adherence and how we can give patients the tools they need to (1) understand how their medication is working for them and (2) hold each other accountable for following their doctors’ instructions.

Do you believe connecting with – and learning from – other patients is critical to adherence?  Share your thoughts in the comments section.

PatientsLikeMe member cfidyk


Remembering My Sister Linda: An Interview with Diabetes Patient Michael Burke (Part I)

Posted November 2nd, 2011 by

PatientsLikeMe Member and Diabetes Blogger Michael Burke

As we’ve discussed in recent blog posts, November is American Diabetes Month.  To help you learn about diabetes from a patient’s point of view, we interviewed Michael Burke, a PatientsLikeMe member who writes “Life on the T List”, a blog about his life as a diabetic before and after a kidney transplant.

But as you’ll soon see, Michael’s life as a diabetic was first influenced by that of another diabetic – his older sister Linda. (He himself was not diagnosed until he was a teenager, more than 10 years after Linda’s diagnosis.)  Below is Michael’s chronicle of her lifelong struggle with type 1 diabetes, and next week we’ll share his own journey, including his June 2011 kidney transplant. Don’t miss this moving story of a family profoundly affected by diabetes.

Tell us about your older sister Linda.

Where do I begin?  Linda was someone who I looked up to my whole life when we were growing up, and even though she is no longer here, I still look up to her.  Linda was diagnosed with [type 1] diabetes when she was six years old, which made me three when she was diagnosed.  So, to say that I grew up with diabetes my whole life is not a stretch.

I didn’t realize it early on, but for Linda, and many diabetics during that time [the 1970s-1980s], staying in control of diabetes was very difficult.  Daily testing was very rudimentary compared to testing today.  Testing back then relied mostly on urine dip sticks and trying to determine what color the test strip was and then compared that to color chart on the bottle.  When the glucose meter was finally introduced, it was as if you could hear a collective sigh of relief from all diabetics.

Linda struggled with her diabetes through much of her childhood and into high school, and then when she was finally in college, it was really taking a toll on her.  Ever since being a child, Linda had a dream of becoming a nurse, perhaps because of the care she received from nurses growing up when she was at the doctor’s office or in the hospital.

If there was one thing that I have always taken from Linda, it is her determination.  She never once wanted to let diabetes control who she was.  While in nursing school at Simmons College in Boston, Linda began to lose her eyesight due to diabetes, among experiencing other complications such as the onset of kidney disease.  But she was not about to let this stand in her way of becoming a nurse.  In fact, [my brother] Tommy and I would go through her nursing books with her and help her study when she was having difficulty seeing the pages.

Michael Burke's Sister Linda on the Day She Graduated from Nursing School

A friend of our family who worked in the ophthalmologic division of Johnson & Johnson at the time told my parents of a retina specialist in Boston that may be able to help Linda.  The doctor was Dr. Edward Ryan.  Dr. Ryan and Linda had a great doctor/patient relationship.  He took a special interest in Linda’s case.  He began using laser surgery on Linda.  All I remember from those treatments was Linda screaming in pain.  The procedure has changed some since then, because I have had it done and it was not painful, probably due to the anesthetic.  Needless to say, Linda and the rest of our family credited Dr. Ryan with saving Linda’s sight – to the point that she was able to graduate nursing school and become a nurse at Children’s Hospital in Boston.

One of the areas many people don’t realize that diabetes affects is your heart.  In 1989, at the age of 24, Linda’s body couldn’t take the constant pounding diabetes was giving her, and, on March 14th, she passed away from underlying heart disease brought on by diabetes.

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Be on the lookout for Part II of Michael’s interview next week.


Be of Good Heart Today

Posted September 29th, 2011 by

Today, September 29th, is World Heart Day. Sponsored by the World Heart Federation, this annual event was started in 2000 to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke, the world’s leading cause of death with more than 17.1 million lives lost each year. All around the globe, activities such as talks, screenings, walks, concerts and sporting events have been organized for today.

World Heart Day 2011

One of the main goals of World Heart Day is to educate the public about the fact that at least 80% of premature deaths from heart disease and stroke could be avoided. All it takes is controlling the three main risk factors: tobacco use, unhealthy diets and physical inactivity. Beyond those, another related risk factor is high cholesterol, which was the subject of yesterday’s blog post.

Here at PatientsLikeMe, a number of patients report cardiovascular conditions as well as conditions that put them at high risk for heart disease or stroke. They include:

If you’ve been diagnosed with one of these conditions, join our growing community and connect with patients like you today. Have a loved one who’s at risk? Educate yourself about the warning signs of a heart attack or stroke. According to the World Heart Federation, over 70 percent of all cardiac and breathing emergencies occur in the home when a family member is present and available to help a victim.


How’s Your HDL and LDL?

Posted September 28th, 2011 by

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, which means it’s a good time to find out your total cholesterol levels as well as your HDL (“good” cholesterol) and LDL (“bad” cholesterol) levels. Have you had them checked in the last five years?

Cholesterol Levels Can Be Tested by Having Blood Work Done at Your Doctor's Office

More than 102 million Americans have a total cholesterol level at or above 200 mg/dL, which is beyond healthy levels, and more than 35 million of those individuals have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher, which puts them at high risk of heart disease. That’s a major concern given that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.

Fortunately, high cholesterol can be lowered with lifestyle changes – including losing weight, eating healthier, exercising and quitting smoking – as well as medication. But to start turning things around, you have to know there’s a problem. Even children and adolescents can have high cholesterol, especially if they are overweight.

Here at PatientsLikeMe, 335 patients report hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) while 235 patients report hyperlipidemia (high lipids in the blood, including cholesterol and triglycerides.) Across both conditions, some of the top reported medications include Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin and Rosovastatin.

If you’re unsure of your cholesterol levels, talk to your doctor at your next visit. And if you’re already aware that your levels are high, reach out to other patients like you today at PatientsLikeMe. Changing your lifestyle isn’t easy, but it’s easier when you have a community to lean on for support, answers and advice.


Let’s Talk About Men’s Health

Posted June 13th, 2011 by

Did you know that, on average, American men are more likely to live sicker and die younger than American women? This has been called “the silent health crisis in America” by Dr. David Gremillion of the Men’s Health Network, and it’s one of the startling health statistics for men being brought to the surface during National Men’s Health Week, which takes place this week, June 13-19, 2011.

National Men's Health Week

Today, a special event is being held in Times Square in New York City with racecar drive Terry Labonte and health expert Dr. Harry Fisch to kick off the week. The theme is “Tune-Up Men’s Health,” with both speakers encouraging men to take care of their bodies the same way they take care of their cars. One reason is that women are 100% more likely to see the doctor for annual exams and preventive services than men.

In accordance with this trend, women outnumber men here at PatientsLikeMe. Out of our 106,453 members as of today, only 17,294 of them are men. That’s less than 20% of our membership. Yet in contrast, men die at higher rates than women from the top 10 causes of death, including heart disease, cancer, injuries, stroke, HIV/AIDS and suicide.

So, in recognition of this disparity as well as Father’s Day on June 19th, we’d like to reach out to men today. Don’t go it alone. If you have a chronic health condition, join PatientsLikeMe to share your experiences, find patients like you and learn how to take control of your health.