10 posts tagged “healthcare”

Largest Patient Poll on ACA Shows Patients Value Health Care Law More Than the General Population, Are Less Inclined to Want a Repeal

Posted February 7th, 2017 by

Lowering Costs, Coverage for Pre-existing Conditions Remain Top Priorities; If Changes Are Required, Individual Mandate Should Go  

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., February 7, 2017—As Congress and the White House continue to discuss potential changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), PatientsLikeMe revealed results from the first large-scale poll to assess patient priorities for the health care law. The poll’s 2,197 respondents are among the estimated 133 million Americans living with chronic conditions.

Sally Okun, PatientsLikeMe’s Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety, said the poll gives voice to those who may be most heavily impacted by changes to the law. “Regardless of your political leaning, the great equalizer is that we’ll all become sick one day. At this time of uncertainty about the future of health care, listening to the voice of patients today will illuminate the path forward for all of us.”

Key findings from the poll show that overall, patients have the same concerns as the general population about health care costs, but see benefits in the law that the healthy may have overlooked:

  • More than half (57%) believe the ACA has been helpful to people living with chronic conditions.
  • Nearly half (46%) feel the ACA needs only minor modifications to improve it.
  • Over the last year, their out-of-pocket expenses for health care have either stayed the same (47%) or increased (43%).
  • Lowering costs is a priority for both patients in the PatientsLikeMe poll and for the general population, which took part in a December 2016 Kaiser Health Tracking Poll. Lowering the amount individuals pay for health care is an important priority for 94% of patients and 93% of the general population. Lowering the cost of prescription drugs is an important priority for 96% of patients and 89% of the general population.
  • Nearly half (46%) of PatientsLikeMe poll respondents felt that a repeal of the 2010 ACA “should not be done,” while one third (31%) of the Kaiser general population felt it “should not be done.”
  • When asked which one component of the ACA they would eliminate if they were forced to choose, PatientsLikeMe respondents were four times more likely to say they would eliminate the individual mandate vs. other components of the ACA.
  • When asked which one component of the ACA they would keep if they were forced to choose, PatientsLikeMe respondents were six times more likely to say they would keep mandatory coverage for pre-existing conditions vs. other components of the ACA.
  • The widest differences in opinion related to questions about a repeal of and government involvement in health care law, and were found between the general population, non-condition specific patients, and those who reported major depressive disorder (MDD) as their primary condition:
  • Of those living with MDD, 59% said that the health care law should not be repealed, vs. 45% of the overall PatientsLikeMe respondents and 31% of the Kaiser general population.
  • 42% of respondents living with MDD said decreasing federal government spending on health care should not be done, vs. 29% of the overall patient population and 18% of the Kaiser general population.
  • As for reducing the federal government’s role in health care, 37% of patients living with MDD said it should not be done, compared to 28% of the overall patient population and 20% of the Kaiser general population.

Okun said that patients living with MDD may have a stronger opinion about healthcare law given the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA), a law passed by Congress in 2008 and codified into rules in 2013 to ensure equal treatment coverage for mental illness and addiction. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), before the law, “mental health treatment was typically covered at far lower levels in health insurance policies than physical illness.”

Full survey results and graphics are available at http://news.patientslikeme.com.

PatientsLikeMe Poll Methodology
Between January 23-27, 2017, PatientsLikeMe fielded a 19-question poll to a sample of its members in the United States who are living with chronic or progressive degenerative conditions. A total of 2,197 patients completed the poll, which asked both original questions and questions from a December 2016 Kaiser Health Tracking Poll to compare patient and general population responses.

Respondents had a range of chronic or progressive medical conditions and listed their primary condition as multiple sclerosis (13%), fibromyalgia (12%), Parkinson’s disease (6%), major depressive disorder (5%), ALS (5%), type 2 diabetes (3%) and multiple myeloma (3%), among many other conditions. The mean age of respondents was 54.5 years (the range was 18- >89). Of 1,840 respondents who gave information on level of education (83.8% of total), 1.0% had less than a high school diploma, 11.0% had high school diplomas, 38.3% had some college, 27.7% reported a college degree, and 22% reported post-graduate education. About one-third (36%) of patients had health insurance through their employer, one-third (35%) had Medicare; and the rest had a mix of other health care coverage including Medicaid, VA, military, and direct pay insurance, which includes insurance purchased from ACA exchange programs. A very small percentage (2.5%) of respondents said they had no health insurance. Nearly all respondents (95%) are registered voters. Their party affiliation is as follows: 37% say they are Democrats, 19% are Republicans; 15% are Independent; 13% preferred not to say; 11% are unaffiliated and 4% are Libertarian.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe, the world’s largest personalized health network, helps people find new options for treatments, connect with others, and take action to improve their outcomes. The company has worked with every major pharmaceutical company and a range of government organizations to bring the patient voice to research, development and public policy. With 500,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 100 research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

 


PatientsLikeMe Names 2015-2016 Team of Advisors, Sets Focus on Redefining Patient Partnerships

Posted October 19th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, October 19, 2015—PatientsLikeMe has named 14 members to its patient-only 20152016 Team of Advisors and challenged them to work through an issue that’s central to everyone in the healthcare system: how to redefine patient partnerships. The team will be focused on rethinking what it means for patients to be partners, and on establishing new ways for the healthcare industry to connect with patients to deliver better care.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said that in an era when patients must be front and center in healthcare discovery and development, the group’s mission is vital to every patient, pharmaceutical company, regulator, payor and provider. “This advisory team includes some of the strongest patient advocates we have ever met. Their experience can empower other patients, and help those serving patients understand what it means to be a good partner. The team’s work will help create a stronger foundation for a more equal and participatory system of care.

More than 1,400 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. The nearly equal mix of men and women are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), bipolar II, cancer, Type 1 diabetes, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lupus, major depressive disorder (MDD), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and post traumatic stress (PTS). Members named to the team include: Christel Aprigliano, Craig Braquet, Jeff Demers, Cyrena Gawuga, David Gewirtz, Phyllis Marchand, John Michael, Gus Prieto, Laura Roix, Patti Sanner, Allison Silensky, Angela Stogner, Doug Thornburg and Peggy Zuckerman.

Christel Aprigliano is living with Type 1 diabetes and believes that the key to a good partnership is a focused, data-driven discussion on what matters most to patients. “Patient reported outcomes are crucial to the healthcare conversation. The more information we can share about what life is like for patients every day, the more questions we can ask each other, and the better we can help patients live well with the disease they have.”

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently kicked off their 12-month collaboration with PatientsLikeMe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and will convene several times in the coming months. This is the second Team of Advisors the company has formed. Last year, the inaugural group provided feedback to the research team and published a best practices guide that outlines new standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage patients throughout the research process.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


PatientsLikeMe and Partners HealthCare Collaborate to Improve Patient Outcomes

Posted May 26th, 2015 by

CAMBRIDGE, MA., May 26, 2015 – PatientsLikeMe and Partners HealthCare announced today that they are working together to give Partners HealthCare patients access to tools and information that can help improve decision making with their clinical teams and enhance health outcomes.

PatientsLikeMe Executive Vice President of Marketing and Patient Advocacy Michael Evers said the agreement is the first to provide access to the website from within a provider’s patient portal. “We’re excited to work with such an esteemed health system to help patients and their care teams have a more complete understanding of patients’ whole health experience, and to support shared decision making about next steps.”

Partners Population Health Management Associate Medical Director Adam Licurse, MD, MHS, who is a leader in population health patient engagement efforts at Partners, added the agreement is a key building block towards the healthcare system’s vision for better involving patients in their care. “We know that as patients become more engaged in their care, they have better care experiences, make more informed decisions based on their goals, and in some cases can actually receive higher value care at the end of the day. Peer mentorship, patient self-management, and patient education are all critical pieces to that puzzle. We believe PatientsLikeMe’s online patient community provides a meaningful solution to help meet these needs.”

As part of the agreement, the organizations:

  • Have provided access to PatientsLikeMe from Partners Patient Gateway, an online tool for patients to learn more about their condition and communicate with their doctors’ offices.
  • Will introduce a new “PatientsLikeMe 101” training series to guide Partners HealthCare clinical teams in helping patients and caregivers get the most out of PatientsLikeMe’s tools and support network.
  • Plan to include patients’ use of the website and its tools at the point of care in select Partners HealthCare clinical care sites and practices. Partners HealthCare clinicians are currently outlining several projects designed to understand how the use of patient-generated health data at the point of care can impact health outcomes, patient engagement, patient empowerment, care coordination and patient satisfaction. The projects are expected to kick off this year.

Partners HealthCare patients are welcome to voluntarily join PatientsLikeMe at http://www.patientslikeme.com or through their Partners Patient Gateway account.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 325,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

About Partners HealthCare
Partners HealthCare is an integrated health care system, founded by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, that offers patients a continuum of coordinated and high-quality care. In addition to its two academic medical centers, the Partners system includes community and specialty hospitals, a managed care organization, a physician network, community health centers, home health and long-term care services, and other health care entities. Partners HealthCare is committed to patient care, research, teaching, and service to the community. Partners is one of the nation’s leading biomedical research organizations and is a principal teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. Partners HealthCare is a non-profit organization.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
(781) 492-1039


Compassion for all: Adrianne shares how friendship grew from the life-altering Boston Marathon Bombing

Posted May 8th, 2015 by

From our partners and friends at the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare.

In 2013, Adrianne joined the Schwartz Center in honoring the caregivers who saved her life after she was injured in the Boston Marathon Bombing, including a special thank you to Jeff Kalish, MD, of Boston Medical Center who performed her surgeries. Research shows that compassion is great medicine, enabling patients to thrive, caregivers to rediscover their passion for healing, and health systems to prosper – click below learn how Adrianne survived and is thriving because of compassionate care.


“…about 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day…” – An interview with Dr. Sarika Aggarwal

Posted December 29th, 2014 by

Sarika Aggarwal, M.D. is Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer at Fallon Health, and it’s her job to make sure all plan members get appropriate, effective and high-quality care. We caught up with Dr. Aggarwal for an interview, and she talks about how she came to spend the last 26 years practicing medicine in Massachusetts, what the new partnership between Fallon Health and PatientsLikeMe means for members, and a bit about her work—especially her focus on helping seniors stay and get care in their own homes whenever possible.

A bit of background: Dr. Aggarwal graduated from Grant Medical College at Bombay University and then completed her residency at UMass Memorial in Worcester, Massachusetts. Before joining Fallon Health in 2012 as Vice President of NaviCare Clinical Programs, Dr. Aggarwal was Medical Director in the Office of Clinical Integration at UMass Memorial Medical Care and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at UMass Medical School.

Dr. Aggarwal, we know a little bit about your background in India. What made you decide to come to the United States?

My husband had been studying in the U.S. for about six years and went back to India to visit his parents. [That’s when we met, and] … I came to the United States three days after we got married. I finished my fourth year medical school clerkships here before starting my residency program.

What drew you to Fallon Health? How have things been going since you took over the role of Chief Medical Officer?

I was Medical Director of Clinical Integration of an academic health system on the provider side during my last job. I realized with the advent of the accountable care organizations (ACOs) that the providers needed to learn to manage risk and develop health plan capabilities, such as utilization management and population health management capabilities—things that the health plans had mastered for many years.

As Medical Director, I was working closely with Fallon on one of its programs for seniors called NaviCare. When I learned of a position to lead the program, it was the opportunity I was waiting for.

The role of Chief Medical Officer has been challenging but exhilarating. It is a work in progress, building new programs to improve member heath, looking for opportunities to reduce waste in the system, and building a culture of continuous process improvement.

How are you bringing your experience with nursing home alternatives for seniors to your new role?

NaviCare was a good training ground for learning about taking care of seniors with multiple chronic diseases. Since about 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day, and a large number of them have more than one chronic disease, we spend a lot of time working on ways to give this population the best care, in the right place, at the right time. A lot of my work in NaviCare involved transition of care models to keep the patients independent at home, and out of the hospitals and nursing homes. We are now using some of these successful care management best practices with our other populations.

What’s your favorite success story during your time at Fallon?

In 2013 we started a pilot with a government provider-payer program. This program involves helping the providers with care coordination for the members we share together, efficient sharing of data and successful embedding of case managers and navigators in the provider sites. We have grown membership in this program, and our care team now participates in the provider team office meetings. We have had a lot of member success stories in this program, which shows what collaboration between the different healthcare entities can achieve.

We’re very excited to be partnering with you and bringing PatientsLikeMe to Fallon members as a free online resource. How do you think your members will benefit from an online community and health-tracking site like PatientsLikeMe?

I think when patients are diagnosed with a new medical condition, whether it is rare or common, they need more than clinical care from their provider. In this complex medical environment, they need support and knowledge from a reliable source. PatientsLikeMe is a great tool that can provide a family of support beyond your own family – a family of support that “gets it.”

Even as a provider, it is hard for me to completely understand all the ramifications of an illness in a patient’s life, since I myself do not live with this illness. PatientsLikeMe is a group of people, a forum where you can meet people to talk to, who understand you and who are just like you. In addition, you can track your progress and learn more about your condition from a reliable source, all in partnership with your providers. It is a win-win situation for all in the healthcare system.


PatientsLikeMe and the Schwartz Center join forces to better understand patients’ perceptions of compassionate care

Posted December 9th, 2014 by

                            

Collaborators Commit to Sharing Information and Educating Patients

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—December 9, 2014—PatientsLikeMe and the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare today announced that they will work together to better understand patients’ perceptions of compassionate care. The collaboration’s goal is to strengthen the relationship between patients and their healthcare providers, which has been associated with better health outcomes, lower costs and increased satisfaction.

Among their work together, the two organizations will survey PatientsLikeMe members to gather their feedback on a proposed Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™, which the Center hopes healthcare organizations will use to measure and reward the compassionate care doctors, nurses and other caregivers provide to patients and families. They will also jointly develop and distribute content to educate patients about compassionate care and what patients can do to elicit compassion from their caregivers.

“Our research shows that while patients believe compassionate care is critically important to successful medical treatment and can even make a life-or-death difference, only about half of patients believe the U.S. healthcare system is a compassionate one,” said Julie Rosen, executive director of the Schwartz Center. “As in other areas of healthcare, we believe measurement can play an important role in improving patients’ care experiences, and we are thrilled to have a collaborator that can help us ensure that we’re measuring what is most important to patients in language they can understand.”

The Schwartz Center has been working on a multi-question scale that rates patients’ perceptions of the compassionate care they receive from clinicians and other caregivers. To further this work, the collaborators will elicit feedback from patients on how relevant this scale is to their experiences by utilizing the Open Research Exchange (ORE), a PatientsLikeMe platform where researchers design, test and share new measures for diseases and health issues.

“What the Schwartz Center is doing to better measure compassionate care is so inspiring,” said Michael Evers, executive vice president of marketing and patient advocacy at PatientsLikeMe. “This is the type of work that ORE is uniquely positioned to support, and this topic is definitely one about which people using our site will have great perspective.”

Added Rosen, “Our goal is to make compassionate care a healthcare priority and a public expectation. Ultimately, we would like to be able to correlate the compassionate care patients receive with the health outcomes they experience. This is the first step in getting us there.”

About the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Care
The Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare is a patient-founded nonprofit dedicated to nurturing patient and caregiver relationships to strengthen the human connection at the heart of healthcare. Research shows that when caregivers are compassionate, patients do better and are more satisfied, and caregivers find greater meaning in their work and experience less stress and burnout. The Center believes that a strong patient-caregiver relationship characterized by effective communication and emotional support, mutual trust and respect, and the involvement of patients and families in healthcare decisions is fundamental to high-quality healthcare. Visit us at www.theschwartzcenter.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 300,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 50 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contacts
Amanda Dalia
adalia@theschwartzcenter.org
617-724-6763

Margot Carlson Delogne
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781-492-1039


PatientsLikeMe and USF Health collaborate to empower cancer patients

Posted December 4th, 2014 by

Partnership Marks the First Between the Patient Network and an Academic Health Center

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—December 4, 2014—PatientsLikeMe and the USF Health Internal Medicine Department have partnered to improve health outcomes for multiple myeloma patients. People living with multiple myeloma and other cancers will be directed to PatientsLikeMe to access patient-reported symptom and treatment information and connect with others to guide their treatment discussions and decisions.

The partnership is PatientsLikeMe’s first with an academic health center. The companies will exchange and publish information on multiple myeloma on their websites and work collaboratively with PatientsLikeMe members to continuously enhance the health and education of people living with the condition. The organizations also expect to collaborate on specific research initiatives in the future.

USF Health, an integral part of the University of South Florida (USF), is a partnership between USF’s health-related colleges and schools and the USF Physician’s Group. “It is an honor as a cancer physician and scientist to become part of a larger community of patients with multiple myeloma,” said Damian Laber MD, Hematology/Oncology division chief at USF and senior member at Moffitt Cancer Center. “This partnership enables patients and their families worldwide to receive the most relevant and current medical information, and will enable us to learn as much as possible from patients so that we not only support them, but improve outcomes for others.”

The agreement is the newest in a series of oncology-focused partnerships for PatientsLikeMe designed to ensure that the patient voice guides cancer research, said Executive Vice President of Marketing and Patient Advocacy Michael Evers. “Every day, thousands of people learn they have cancer. More and more of them are joining our site to not only get information and support, but to contribute their health data for research. We’re excited to help USF Health members improve their day-to-day lives, and to partner with such a distinguished research and educational institution so that we can have an impact on people’s lives longer term.”

USF Health members interested in joining PatientsLikeMe can sign up at www.patientslikeme.com/join/usf.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 300,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 50 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blogTwitter or Facebook.

About USF Health
USF Health’s mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician’s Group. The University of South Florida is a Top 50 research university in total research expenditures among both public and private institutions nationwide, according to the National Science Foundation. For more information, visit www.health.usf.edu.

Contacts
Kristy Andre, USF Health Department of Internal Medicine
kandre@health.usf.edu
813-300-9006

Margot Carlson Delogne, PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781-492-1039


H@cking Medicine: Open Up!

Posted October 21st, 2011 by

hackingmedicineThis weekend, MIT is hosting the first H@cking Medicine conference and PatientsLikeMe is proud to be a sponsor. The hacking encouraged here isn’t malicious, rather, it refers to a passionate subculture of computer programmers who believe in sharing, openness, and innovation (among other things).  Those are three concepts near and dear to us here at PatientsLikeMe.

The goal of the conference is to inspire new ideas and create new relationships so that everyone will leave invigorated and excited about improving healthcare.  According to the H@cking Medicine website, “By using available tools in unconventional ways, we aim to revolutionize delivery of care, empower patients, and design new models of care. Typically, healthcare innovation is painfully slow and, even worse, often increases the cost.  We can make a difference by creating cost-effective solutions without waiting for fundamental advances in science.”

To kick off the event on the first day, our own Jamie Heywood (keynote) as well as other leaders in the health care field will inspire audience members with ways to find and learn from the best use of openly shared data. The second day is dedicated to team hacking, and gives coders a practical look at what can be done with the available resources.

Read more about this subculture of hackers on Wikipedia and follow the H@cking Medicine conference updates on their website and Twitter.


Health 2.0: Where do we go from here?

Posted October 10th, 2008 by

h20nelogo971510_std.jpgA few nights ago, I was honored to give a keynote at the second Health 2.0 Northeast conference held right here in our Cambridge, MA backyard.  It’s exciting to see old friends and new emerging start-ups coming together to try and make a dent in the $2 trillion industry that is healthcare in the U.S.  In the world of Health 2.0, we have a lot of great opportunities to impact healthcare in a positive way, including shaking things up and putting patients back at the center.  With so many new and promising companies emerging in the space (many in attendance at the Boston event), we have to start thinking about what happens next.  How can we really make change, and what changes need to be made?

trailtoprofitability-1.png I believe we, as the eHealth community, need to focus on two major goals:  1) solve patients’ problems, and 2) create business models that allow us to do #1.  The PatientsLikeMe business model is straightforward.  We build online communities where patients share structured information about their disease to help themselves and others.  In turn, we make money by selling that data.  We are open with our patients about how and why we sell this data (and specifically what data we sell).  They understand this exchange and they’re all for it. “Sell, sell, sell” someone recently wrote in a discussion about our business model.  Why?  Because they know our goal in selling is to help pharmaceuticals companies, medical device companies, healthcare providers, and others in the industry learn more about patients.  We’re giving those companies the kind of information that can help improve the products/services they’re creating for patients.

I don’t want to prognosticate about what types of business models will work for all Health 2.0 companies as the industry evolves (because, ultimately, this is an evolution).  It’s up to each company to figure that out.  I do believe that there’s no wrong path when you keep both those goals in your sights.  Help patients, and create business models to do that.  Moving forward as a company and as an industry, that’s exactly what we need to do.  Now let’s get back to work…

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood


The growth of social media in health care

Posted January 26th, 2008 by

According to a December 2007 iCrossing survey cited by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn in her Health Populi blog “34% of Americans turn to social media for health research.”

Jane points to PatientsLikeMe and others as “proof of the reality of social media in health is alive and well and healing”, and observes that “increasing numbers of people are reaching out to others for more than the kind of support they might have found in the Compuserve health interest groups in the 1980s; they’re finding practical solutions to chronic health challenges”

Interesting reading, especially her response to one commenter that “In the case of info for PatientsLikeMe, the database on drug dosing, quality of life and outcomes throughout the MS cycle is probably richer than any other single source on the globe”.

PatientsLikeMe member thorgan