2 posts tagged “forum discussion”

Lupus flares: Stats and infographics based on the PatientsLikeMe community’s experiences

Posted December 18th, 2017 by

Lupus flares are hard to define. In fact, there wasn’t a clear clinical definition of flares until 2010 (and even that definition is pretty broad).

If you’re living with lupus, how would you define a flare? What do you experience during one? To gain a deeper understanding of flares from the patient perspective, the PatientsLikeMe research team partnered with Takeda Pharmaceuticals to study our online community’s discussions and data related to flares. Check out these graphics that show some of the key findings about flares among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the most common form of lupus.

A mix of symptoms

Below are the five symptoms researchers spotted most frequently in SLE forum posts about flares. Other flare symptoms mentioned in the forum include: nausea, fever/flu, lupus fog, hair loss, migraine, back pain, blood pressure, bloody nose, insomnia, mental health effects, panic, rib pain, skin sensitivity, swollen glands, weakness, weight gain, lower GI, face tumor, hives, infection, vasculitis, and voice effects.

“I was really flaring…”

PatientsLikeMe researchers say that a flare is “a cluster of symptoms which usually includes pain and fatigue, at a minimum.” But the specifics may vary: Everyone describes their flares — and their duration — differently. Here are just a couple of the forum posts researchers highlighted.

Living with more than lupus

“…and then I had a flare of lupus, RA and Sjogren’s that still has not gone away,” one member wrote in the forum. Many members who’ve discussed their flares have also shared which other conditions they’ve been diagnosed with in addition to lupus.

If you’re living with lupus, how would you describe what happens during your flares? How long do they tend to last? Do you have other conditions that make your flares worse or hard to identify? Share your experiences here, or — even better — join PatientsLikeMe to learn from and connect with nearly 30,000 people living with lupus.

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Not Recognizing the “New Me”

Posted December 10th, 2012 by

Are You Resistant to the Idea of a Wheelchair?

For many newly diagnosed patients, accepting help can be as difficult as accepting the diagnosis itself.  According to some of the members of our Parkinson’s disease community, here are a few signs that you may be struggling with the idea of becoming someone who might need help.

  • Have you found yourself feeling resentful when family, friends or strangers try to assist with something?
  • Have you resisted using a complimentary wheelchair (e.g., at the airport or on cruise ship) out of embarrassment?
  • Have you worried that becoming someone who receives help is going to change your lifelong identity?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you are far from alone.  Many PatientsLikeMe members report that learning to accept help gracefully is one of the most challenging aspects of chronic illness.  And it’s not just allowing the help itself, per se, but seeing yourself in a new light, as one member puts it.  It’s not unusual to take great pride in being a superman or superwoman, the type of handy, resourceful person who does it all and is always helping others in the family or community.  This can be part of your self-image, as well as a source of self-esteem.

So what do you do when you are suddenly the person being helped instead of the helper?  It requires a psychological shift, according to our members, that involves letting go of ego and viewing the care and assistance you are receiving as a gift, not an insult.  It also means communicating frequently and lovingly about the issue, so as to address “the elephant in the room.”  If you can manage the task yourself, speak up and say so politely, advises one patient.  Otherwise, practice saying “thank you” and “I love you” with gratitude, encourages another member.  Ultimately, as our members state over and over, the best tools for coming to terms with the realities of your new life are a positive attitude, humor and support from others like you.

Can you relate to this common hurdle?  Join this insightful discussion in our forum or share your thoughts in the comments section.