7 posts tagged “fibromyalgia community”

Let’s make fibromyalgia visible today

Posted May 12th, 2017 by

Fibromyalgia awareness day

“I get so angry when friends come over to visit, after I haven’t been able to get out of the house for a month, and tell me how good I look. Or the idiots who ask you how you got the handicapped parking tag when you look so healthy. People just don’t see how difficult this disease is.”

-PatientsLikeMe member living with fibromyalgia

“I am so tired of the ‘but you don’t look sick’ comments.”

-PatientsLikeMe member with fibromyalgia

“I feel like I shouldn’t talk about it because I don’t expect it will make a positive impact on me if I do.”

-PatientsLikeMe member with fibromyalgia

This is the reality for those living with fibromyalgia – and since May 12 is Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, the fibro community is rallying to make this condition visible. The National Fibromyalgia Association has reported that it is one of the most common chronic pain conditions in the United States, affecting an estimated 10 million adults, with around 75%-90% of the people living with fibromyalgia being women.

Because fibromyalgia is an invisible illness, explaining it to others can be even more difficult. That’s why 2015-2016 Team of Advisors member Craig (woofhound), who is living with fibromyalgia, wrote an open letter to the “normals” describing what it’s like to live with a chronic pain condition while dispelling myths that often surround it.

Letter to the normals

 “We really do care about you and really wanted to visit, but if we listen honestly to our bodies we can’t afford the toll of that visit. We know that makes us come across as ‘flaky’ especially if we’ve had to cancel at the last minute, but if you understood this condition you would see that we don’t really have the choice”.

 

Check out Craig’s full open letter to the normals here.

 

So, how can someone with fibromyalgia improve their quality of life? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are a few things that people living with fibromyalgia can do – namely, exercise.

  • Get active – The CDC suggests physical activity can help improve symptoms of fibromyalgia, including pain, sleep problems and fatigue. It can also reduce the risk of developing other chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes. However, physical activity can be extremely challenging for those living with chronic pain, so the CDC advises to start slowly and gradually increase your activity level. It can be as small as doing some stretches in bed each morning. They also have a list of recommended exercise programs which you can read more about here.
  • Self-management education – learning more about your condition can help you gain better control over managing your symptoms. Joining sites like PatientsLikeMe to learn about yourself and others like you can help you better understand life with you condition. The CDC also has a list of recommended self-management education programs.

There are more than 3,000 topics in the fibromyalgia forum tagged with “exercise”. Join the discussion!

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A Good Surprise: An Interview with Fibromyalgia Member DarkAuburn

Posted February 1st, 2013 by

Did you know we now have more than 30,000 members in our fibromyalgia community?  In honor of this major milestone, we decided to interview DarkAuburn, who joined in 2009.  She’s a three-star member, which means she’s earned our top star rating for sharing complete, in-depth information about her fibromyalgia symptoms, treatments, quality of life and much more.  In addition, she has opted for a public profile, which means that anyone on the Internet (whether a PatientsLikeMe member or not) can learn from her detailed condition history.  Check out our interview with this veteran member below.

PatientsLikeMe member DarkAuburn with her son

1. Tell us a little about the PatientsLikeMe fibromyalgia community.

I was not expecting much when I found the site. I thought it would be more of an informational, non-involvement sort of site. I was surprised, as in a good surprise. I don’t know many people where I live that have fibromyalgia, and I didn’t realize how welcoming this site would be. I found people who, like me, wanted answers. The sharing of information and support was a nice thing to find.

2. What’s it like to have access to the experiences and data of tens of thousands of other fibromyalgia patients?

It’s staggering. I didn’t know much about fibromyalgia before I was diagnosed. I can’t say I’m an expert now either. But the information has helped me better communicate with my doctor.

3. As a wife, mother and grandmother, how has fibromyalgia affected your family?

People ask my husband all the time how I am doing. He will tell them that I have good days and bad days, and we have learned to take each day as it comes. When I told my children, they were concerned. My daughter is a research junkie, and she looked it up and explained to her brother what I have. His response was, “That explains a lot.” Since I don’t get to see my children and grandchildren on a daily basis, I just deal with fibromyalgia and play with my grandchildren.

4.  What’s the most important thing you’ve learned from other patients?

I have learned that I am not alone in this.