22 posts tagged “FDA”

“I really felt that we were heard” — PatientsLikeMe staff member Dan shares his experience at the FDA psoriasis conference

Posted August 2nd, 2016 by

August is Psoriasis Awareness Month, and we’re kicking things off with a recap from the FDA’s public meeting on psoriasis back in March. The meeting was part of their Patient-Focused Drug Development Series that aims to bring the patient voice to research.

Sally Okun, Vice President for Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety at PatientsLikeMe notes that, “The most effective part of the meeting was the patient stories. Even though a lot of quantitative data has been gathered by the FDA, they’re learning firsthand how difficult it is for these patients. Having an event that’s so patient-centric – where people are telling their stories and those attending can submit questions through the webinar – really lets patients make their voices be heard.”

The PatientsLikeMe psoriasis community also gave feedback through a survey in the weeks before the meeting, and this data was shared with the FDA. Check out the full report of what members had to say.

And Dan, one of our community moderators here at PatientsLikeMe, attended as both a member of our staff and a patient. We caught up with him to chat about his experience. Here’s what he had to say:

What was it like to attend this event as someone living with psoriasis?

I have had psoriasis for 23 years. I wasn’t alone, as my sister and brother had very mild symptoms, and my father and his brother had more moderate symptoms. So for me, having the disease itself wasn’t scary from a medical point of view. But I certainly suffered from social stigma as plaques cover all of my legs, arms and much of my torso.

As I learned from meeting my peers at the PFDD psoriasis conference, many psoriasis patients tend to hide their symptoms as best as they can by wearing clothes that conceal it, and by not participating in activities that would expose it to the public. I, too, was very challenged by the fact that my condition was so visible.

I also have ADD and an acquired learning disability (auditory delay due to an early childhood fever), on top of which I experienced a fair amount of trauma, which resulted in PTS.

I think this is probably why my symptoms were so bad since psoriasis is closely linked to stress and mental health. As a teen, I was grasping for coping mechanisms and esteem builders and I found solace and comfort in climbing, swimming, and hiking outdoors. When I started to experience my psoriatic symptoms, I couldn’t imagine giving up these activities. And so, I simply had to endure and explain my disease to everyone. I rarely, if ever, met anyone else who allowed their psoriasis to be as visible, and I felt extremely isolated. Not to mention my peers also had little or no exposure to people living with this condition aside from myself, thus increasing my issues with stigma.

Going to this meeting was amazing; I was surrounded by patients just like me for the very first time.

It felt incredibly rewarding! However, because I’d spent so much effort over the years suppressing my issues with stigma and the discomfort of psoriasis, it was challenging to process the emotions that came flooding back as I listened to the other patients’ experiences. I was almost brought to tears more than once. Not just for my peers and their suffering, but in recognizing a new awareness about my experience.

My peers were all gathered here to advocate and to express their hardships regarding psoriasis, and in the process they demonstrated incredible personal strength in dealing with this condition and speaking up about it. I was really impressed and inspired.

I also realized how strong I had become by managing the symptoms and stigma with little to no peer support for so many years. This in itself was also a very powerful experience; incredibly validating.

What were the most talked about issues at this meeting?

Much of the meeting revolved around two main issues: the pain and discomfort of psoriasis, and the stigma of having a visible and disfiguring illness. But also many interesting aspects of the patient experience were brought up. For example, nearly every African American present as a patient reported disparities in diagnosis. They all reported that their physicians were not aware that African Americans could even have psoriasis, leading to years of medications prescribed for infections they never had, side effects, and feeling that the medical system had completely failed them.

The prominent topic was around the levels of pain and itching that people experience with this disease, but then it migrated to include discussion of the cognitive and emotional toll of the illness. The level of patient suffering was palpable and very powerful, and sent a strong message to the FDA and the community attending.

Some people experienced constant burning feelings, like their skin was on fire. There were descriptions of feeling like their skin was encased in a cast of plaques, stiff, and uncomfortable, as well as sharp pangs of the open cracks and sores, which any movement or itching created. For many the pain was crippling.

There was also a lot of mention of the stigma experiences from patients recalling their experience as young children and adolescents, managing the emotional challenges of growing up combined with having a misunderstood and stigmatizing skin condition.

Psoriasis manifests in flakey white scales on top of fiercely inflamed red skin, which often cracks open and bleeds. Most people that we meet in our daily lives have no idea what psoriasis is, and are often afraid to even ask. This can lead to us being treated like we are infectious. In many ways it’s hard to blame them, the affected areas often look like Hollywood made-up zombies…

We also we leave bits of ourselves everywhere in the form trails or even piles of silvery flakes on chairs, under our desks, all over the house, and the cracked inflamed skin often leaves blood spots on any light colored clothing, bedding, and furniture.

I have always stepped past my shame and used the opportunity to apologize for the gross mess that I leave because it gave me an opportunity to educate people about what I have so hopefully they wouldn’t be scared of me, but many others in the group reported having a really difficult time talking about their illness with others.

Many coping mechanisms were described like avoiding dark clothes where the flakes would be very visible, or avoiding light clothes as they could highlight the blood stains. Many people also talked about always wearing long sleeves and pants, and going so far as closing the cuff’s of their shirts and pants with adhesive tape to prevent the flakes from spilling out everywhere in public.

Everyone also described this constant emotionally taxing vigilance of trying not to itch or scratch our affected skin as it makes more flakes, which is hard because of the overwhelming itchiness and burning pain. To compound this, many patients in the room had psoriatic lesions on their buttocks and genitals. Can you imagine being in work, or class, out shopping and being consumed with trying to manage the urge to stick your hands in your pants and just itch away? A tragic reality that results in shame, distraction, and, in the end, exhaustion.

Then there is the ever-present social stigma risk mitigation; always shaking out your collar, and sweeping flakes off one’s shoulders away so you don’t look like your are a walking trail of dandruffy, diseased skin.

Even when we are surrounded by educated and empathetic people we know or at least project that they are all affected by our appearance and the messes of “bio waste” we leave in our wake, there is this constant knowledge that we are less desirable as friends, lovers, and even just associates and co-workers; as one panelist reported that they felt as though people treated them as if the were a leper. It’s nearly impossible to disassociate our identity from our disease, because everyone sees our disease right in front of them.

There were a lot of reports of absenteeism from things like school, work, and even fun social events like going to the beach; anywhere public where the emotional effort of managing stigmatization 24/7 was simply too much to handle on a day-to-day basis. There were even questions brought up about whether we were more susceptible to STDs. The meeting facilitator at the FDA explained that they had never heard so many patients attribute such levels of emotional and cognitive fatigue, and brain fog/mental exhaustion to psoriasis. She seemed to be recognizing this as a new and disabling symptom. The FDA was listening!

In the end, we heard each other’s voices amplifying the realities to the FDA and the public that psoriasis clearly affects people on very deep levels; the obvious physical pain and itching, as well as the social stigma fears; the internal shaming and awkward external conversations we have with everyone we meet about our bodies and how our bodies corrupt everyone else’s living and work spaces.

I think the prevailing message was this isn’t a painful and uncomfortable skin issue, this illness touches every aspect our lives especially our mental health.

The irony is, like all autoimmune disease, psoriasis is exacerbated by stress, and having psoriasis causes a lot of stress. I don’t think the medical community has ever really quite understood the interplay between these symptoms and conditions.

Did you feel like the meeting was patient-centric and that your voice was being heard?

I really felt that we were heard. Everything in the program was designed to capture the patient’s voice.

They had this amazing system set up: the facilitator or the FDA staff would ask a panelist a question, and, as soon as they received their answer, they would turn to the audience and ask us the same questions in a multiple choice format. The community listening online would respond from their devices, and the patients in the audience all had received small wireless handsets allowing us to provide our experience. They would then project the results on large screens positioned around the room allowing us to analyze the answers in real time, often prompting the FDA staff to ask follow up questions so they could really gain an in depth understanding of the issue at hand.

You attended as both a PatientsLikeMe employee and a psoriasis patient. What was it like to engage in something like this with an organization like the FDA with that kind of dual perspective?

I think this was the most difficult part for me for two reasons. I wanted to make sure that I was an active participant as a psoriatic patient, and I also was trying to network with other patients and providers to let them know about PatientsLikeMe, and capture the experience so that I could relate it to other patients like me who may attend future events. It was certainly challenging to do all three at the same time.

Going to this event and participating as a patient meant so much to me, knowing that I’d be communicating my experience to these senior staff members of the FDA who will be guiding the future of psoriasis therapies. And hearing other people’s stories about their experience really helped me understand more about my own experience. I realized that I had never really fully processed the challenge of having a stigmatizing visible condition. I also realized that I had a strength that I had not recognized — although my psoriasis has been very challenging, I have managed to live a very full life and have been able to manage the emotional toll that psoriasis exerts. I also felt a little absolved: Has my depression and fatigue been partially fueled by my psoriasis? Have I been shaming myself for years for not overcoming these two issues, when they were not moral failings but part of a larger systemic health condition associated with my autoimmune disease?

On the whole, I’m very glad I went to the PFDD conference on psoriasis; it affected me profoundly and I think that the FDA really was listening and absorbing the experience of the psoriasis patient community. I was proud to be there and I was inspired by the strength of my peers. I really thank PatientsLikeMe for providing me with this rare once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

 

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PatientsLikeMe Names Marni Hall Senior Vice President

Posted July 11th, 2016 by

Former Director within the FDA to Spearhead Company’s Research and Policy Initiatives

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 11, 2016—PatientsLikeMe announced today it has appointed Marni Hall, PhD, MPH, as its new Senior Vice President of Research and Policy. A distinguished research scientist and public policy expert, Hall will develop and direct the strategies and teams focused on expanding the role of real-world evidence in precision medicine, and in the research agendas of PatientsLikeMe and its customers.

Hall joins the company from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) where she was most recently Director of Regulatory Science within the Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology (OSE) for the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). In this role, Hall became an expert at sourcing and analyzing big data sets, including adverse event reports, claims, -omics, and other data useful to risk assessment and risk management activities. She led data management and program operations, as well as research and development efforts to identify, evaluate, and implement new data, tools, and methods to support regulatory decision making. Specifically Hall’s team explored big data sources such as the FDA Adverse Event Reporting Systems (FAERS) and the Sentinel Initiative, and led post-market safety studies and programs using observational data to gain insight into drug safety and drug performance.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said Hall “will now apply her strategic research and operational expertise to help us work with our members and partners to use patient-reported data in new and innovative ways, so that the patient experience can lead to even more significant developments and discoveries, such as improved outcomes.”

According to Hall, the new opportunity allows her to continue to do research in a scientifically-rigorous and patient-centered setting. “PatientsLikeMe has been a critical force in documenting and analyzing real-life patient experiences and evolving the role of real-world evidence in clinical and public health research. My goal is to extend its impact, so that the patient experience drives a future where healthcare is able to emphasize individual needs and preferences. I’m thrilled to join a company that is so focused on helping people thrive each day, while collecting data essential to this emerging field,” Hall said.

A research scientist by training, Hall has spent nearly two decades at the intersection of science and policy. She started her career studying toxicology and molecular epidemiology at Columbia University. After serving as Program Director in the Public Health Group of External Medical Affairs at Pfizer, Hall joined the FDA’s Office of Planning and Informatics (OPI) in 2008 as a Principal Analyst. In this role, she initiated and led the development of CDER’s data standards plan. She was appointed Director of Regulatory Science in 2011.

Hall holds bachelor of science degrees in chemistry and in society, technology, and policy from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. She also holds a master’s degree in public health from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health as well as a master of science degree in biochemistry and a PhD in toxicology from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

About PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate #dataforgood: data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 400,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 70 research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Katherine Bragg
PatientsLikeMe
kbragg@patientslikeme.com
+1.617.548.1375


Your data doing good: Our collaboration with the FDA

Posted December 21st, 2015 by

During #24DaysofGiving this December, we’ve been highlighting all the good your health data is doing. For this one, we wanted to share more about how the data you donate is the centerpiece of a new collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Even after a new medication or treatment makes it through the rigorous clinical trial and FDA approval process, we still have a lot to learn about its impact in the real world. Clinical trials are considered the ‘gold standard’ of medical research, but they usually only account for a small fraction of the population that will eventually be prescribed that new treatment.

Today, the FDA reviews large claims data and uses a spontaneous reporting system of individual case safety reports to find out how a product is doing once it’s approved and in the market. If you think that sounds complicated and not very clear, you’re not alone. Basically, the FDA is waiting for a safety signal, dramatic event or adverse event (all fancy words for side effect) to happen that drug manufacturers are required to report. The problem is if you – the patient – or your doctor doesn’t submit a report about your experience to the drug manufacturer, then the drug manufacturer can’t report it to the FDA.

That’s why PatientsLikeMe and the FDA decided to collaborate this year. We wanted to see if patient-reported data from PatientsLikeMe could help the FDA identify new information about approved treatments when they are used outside of clinical trials. Since you generate the data, it provides important real-time insights into your experience over time, including drug tolerance, adherence and quality of life. In short, we’ll be learning if the aggregated real-world, longitudinal data you report can help the FDA better assess and manage risks.

But this isn’t entirely new to us here at PatientsLikeMe. We’ve actually been tracking the treatment effects you share about since 2008. In all, and thanks to your reporting, we’ve collected more than 110,000 side effect reports on 1,000 different medications. That’s information the FDA will now be able to study and analyze in addition to more traditional sources.

Now you know what’s behind our friendly emails and reminders when we ask you to update your treatments or complete a treatment evaluation during #24DaysofGiving. Everything you donate is going to help a whole lot of people!

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Your data doing good: IPF treatment experiences

Posted December 12th, 2015 by

Every minute of every day, people are sharing their health data on PatientsLikeMe. Some of you are focused on tracking how you’re doing over time. Many want to make sure the next person diagnosed can learn from your experience. All are contributing to the greater good, because what you share helps researchers see what patients really need.

During #24DaysofGiving, we’re highlighting some of the most important things we’ve learned from data that members like you have selflessly shared, and all the good your data donations are doing.

Every year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves new medications that can help people living with life-changing conditions. But with new treatments come new questions. And that’s exactly what happened at the end of 2014 for people living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

IPF is a rare condition that causes scarring in deep lung tissue over time and has no cause or cure, and before October 2014 no available treatment. That’s when two FDA-approved medications for the condition became available, simultaneously. They had the potential to make a difference in the lives of IPF patients, but how could they learn which medication might be right for them? If they started taking one of the new treatments, would they experience the side effects that were reported by the FDA? Would the side effects go away, or get better? In short: were the drugs worth taking?

We set out on a journey with members of the PatientsLikeMe IPF community to get answers from the best source possible—other patients who had already started to take the treatments. We worked together to understand their complete experience, everything from how they learned about the new treatments and if they were hard to access, to their side effects and what might cause them to switch treatments. The data that the community shared (all of it) is helping other members better understand what could work for them.

Here’s just some of what we discovered, and what others are learning, thanks to the data that members donated:

About making choices and getting access
Physician buy-in matters. In fact, physicians were active participants in 60-70% of the treatment decisions IPF patients made. But once they made a choice to begin treatment, patients were challenged to work around obstacles that prevented them from getting access to the treatment, things like how to get reimbursed and even where to fill the prescription.

About the side effects vs. the clinical trial
The overall side effects when first starting the medication were similar. Most patients, between 69-72%, reported ‘none’ or ‘mild’ side effects for one or other treatment. Patients also reported some side effects more often than those patients who were in the clinical trials. For one medication, patients reported higher rates of decreased appetite compared to the clinical trial participants (27% vs. 8%) and sensitivity to sunlight (18% v. 9%).  For the other treatment, patients reported a higher rate of decreased appetite (19% v. 11%) compared to the clinical trial participants.

Switching it up
Most patients, between 55-57%, aren’t sure if they are satisfied with their treatment, but only a small percentage, between 8-10%, report that they are likely to stop taking the medications

There is a lot more to learn here:

We’ll all continue to learn in real time as more and more IPF members share their experiences with the treatments, but the IPF example underscores why giving your data matters so much—to you, to others, and to research. We’re truly better together.

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Getting “Patients Included” right Part II: Planning a patient-centric event

Posted November 18th, 2015 by

You may remember Part I of this blog that focused on the experiences of two PatientsLikeMe members who attended the Kidney Health Initiative’s (KHI) workshop, “Understanding patients’ preferences: Stimulating medical device development in kidney disease,” back in August. KHI is a partnership between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). We recently spoke with patient Celeste Lee and Frank Hurst, MD, Medical Officer, Renal Devices Branch with the FDA, about the planning and consideration it took to make this event “Patients Included.”

While this was the first patient-centric event KHI has held, they’ve worked to include the patient voice in all aspects of the initiative. Kidney patients and kidney patient organizations are represented on the KHI Board of Directors, and this past year the KHI Board of Directors formed a KHI Patient and Family Partnership Council (PFPC) made up of only patients and their caregivers. The PFPC helps provide strategic guidance on how to engage and include patients, their families and care partners in KHI activities.

Celeste has had kidney failure from an autoimmune disease since she was 17. She’s been an advocate for decades and is now focused on patient-centered care. Celeste is also a board member on the inaugural PFPC and helps review potential projects from a patient and family member viewpoint.

“The way KHI works is that it brings everyone to the table – researchers, industry professionals, patients – and we ask what is it that we can do to improve research and clinical trials and ultimately, patient lives. We do this through specific projects like this workshop,” she says.

Involving patients from the get-go

As part of this particular workshop, KHI wanted to hear patients’ ideas and preferences on new devices to manage kidney disease. Before anything, though, they had to create an event that would provide the greatest value to patients that attended in person.

When we asked Frank and Celeste what goes into planning an event like this  they shared how they think it can be centered around the patient:

“Involving patients early helped us to realize the need to broaden efforts to educate patients on the topics of interest prior to having the workshop. This proved to be a critical step in the planning process,” says Frank.

“We realized it would save time to educate prospective attendees about the new devices via webinars before the workshop,” explains Celeste. “We ended up taking a three-step approach that started with a quick engagement video talking about what we wanted to do. We distributed this throughout the whole kidney community. At the end of the video, there was an invitation to sign up for the webinars. After the webinar we said – now we are going to have a day and a half workshop and we will provide travel grants. Over 50 travel grants were given, funded by KHI so patients could come from all over the country.”

Frank notes, “Although patients are medical device consumers, they rarely have an opportunity to influence products that come to market. The success of a new medical device is based on many factors, including the usability by patients. KHI provided a forum, which allowed stakeholders to hear about ideas and potential solutions directly from patients.”

Looking at it from all angles

While the main consideration was making sure KHI had set clear expectations to patients who attended from the onset, there were additional logistics to consider for the workshop to be as patient-centric as possible. The workshop agenda was arranged around patient treatment schedules and incorporated dietary considerations when planning the menu. Because some attendees are on dialysis or live with transplants, they needed volunteers on hand. KHI planners also made sure to ask for patient feedback throughout the entire event and had scribes in position to record it. This feedback was ready to be shared at the workshop’s closing and will be sent out in an executive summary as well.

“Patients especially enjoyed the small group sessions,” Frank says. “These were multi-stakeholder breakout discussions which tackled important questions such as unmet needs, device areas that need improvement, making clinical trials more patient-friendly, and assessing ways for patients, industry, and regulators to communicate and share feedback.  These sessions included many lively discussions where patients felt empowered to share ideas and come together to propose solutions.”

Patient advice for a patient-centric event

Celeste has simple advice for other organizations that want to have this level of patient inclusion in their events. “I think you start off with a really good planning team that includes patients so that they’re there to help figure out the challenges of bringing that population together. Most importantly – you need to prepare people to be a part of it. You’re not going to get anything of value if people come in cold. It’s about the patient being able to draw on their experiences to help move research forward so if they understand what’s expected of them going in, then the outcomes will be more valuable.”

Frank adds, “It is also important to consider the spectrum of the disease, and ideally include patient representatives from across the spectrum as they could have very different needs.”

“Then,” Celeste says, “the next step is getting them to share the developments within the greater community. Once patients are educated and engaged, they become empowered.”

For a look at the KHI’s 3-step plan, check out this presentation they shared with us! And of course, don’t forget to visit the site and connect with the more than 1,000 other PatientsLikeMe members living with chronic kidney disease.

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Getting “Patients Included” right Part I: Two members attend a Kidney Health Initiative workshop

Posted November 4th, 2015 by

Back in August, the Kidney Health Initiative (KHI), a partnership between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), held a workshop called “Understanding patients’ preferences: Stimulating medical device development in kidney disease.” But this was more than a workshop – it was an event centered around the idea of “Patients Included” – a movement started back in May to involve more patients on the planning committees, stages, and in the audiences of medical conferences.

Sally Okun, our Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety spoke at the event and notes how patient-focused the entire workshop was in that “nearly 100 people among the approximately 150 who gathered for the event were patients living with and managing kidney disease every day, many joined by their caregivers.”

“The patients were very open in the discussions and direct in their questions. Many talked about their experiences with hemodialysis and how difficult it is to live a normal life when one has to be at the dialysis center three days a week for many hours,” she says. “In contrast to the conventional treatment approach, the newer developments for hemodialysis at home were very interesting, and in general, patients felt more in control.”

She concludes, “The KHI did a remarkable job focusing this meeting on patients and their caregivers, and providing resources to cover travel expenses. They should be commended and looked to by others as an example of getting ‘Patients Included’ right.”

PatientsLikeMe members Samantha-Anne (internettie) and Laura (Cherishedone) both received stipends to attend the workshop. We asked them about their experiences and here’s what they said:

Why was it important for you to attend this workshop event?

S: It is important to me as a patient to have a voice in my care and treatment. It was particularly important to me to attend this workshop because I wanted to be a voice for the patient who has not yet arrived at the need for dialysis or transplant and to ask what we can do to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) from progressing if possible. I know that not all cases can be prevented, but there are some that can. In my situation, my CKD was caused by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). If the consequences of using these drugs for such a long period of time had been made clear to me and if I had been offered some alternative treatments I may have made different treatment choices.

L: I have always been strongly committed to advocating for myself and others, and being given the opportunity to participate and then bring back the information to others whose lives are impacted by CKD and/or end stage renal disease (ESRD) equips us with insight to better advocate for ourselves.

Is this the first event like this that you’ve attended?

S: Yes, this is the first time that I was offered the opportunity to have a voice in patient care. It certainly will not be the last.

L: I have attended National Kidney Foundation (NKF) meetings with other patients and also participated on NKF committees (Patient and Family Executive Committee).

How did you feel about the focus on patient-centricity at this event?

S: I was thrilled to know that someone cared about what patients have to say about their own care. I think that with the advent of the Internet and patients having more access to information that they are more involved in their own care. Patients know more and want to know more about what illnesses are affecting their bodies and they also want to know what they can do to prevent some of these conditions from happening in the first place.

L: The patient-centricity was one of the most valuable components of the meeting. I am one to be very involved in giving back, but I would guess that for many, their disease leaves them feeling isolated. For this population to meet others who are not only surviving but thriving is very important. My hope is that many participants were encouraged to not let their CKD/ESRD define them, but rather to use it as a vehicle for being empowered and encouraged to live each day to the fullest extent, not be left feeling like a victim to the disease.

Did you feel like they supported you and listened to you while you were there?

S: I absolutely felt like I was listened to at this workshop. I had an opportunity to talk to so many people on all different levels of health care. I had wonderful conversations with Paul Conway (AAKP), Mark Ohen (Gore), Denny Treu (NxStage), Sally Okun (PatientsLikeMe), Prabir Roy-Chaudhury, MD, (ASN) Frank Hurst, MD (FDA), Francesca Tentori, ME (ARCH), and F.P. Wieringa, PhD (DKF). We all had the shared topic of kidney disease to discuss but I was amazed at how many people I had other areas in common with. Paul Conway knew my new hometown of Waterville, Maine, and Denny Treu was familiar with my former home in Colorado Springs, Colorado. I feel like my love of research and my desire to learn new things and to share my experiences made this conference a catalyst for me to not only offer my view but to be asked to participate in conversations that I would not be privy to otherwise. I felt like I was engaged in the process and made to feel that my opinion was valued.

L: Most definitely!

What stood out to you as an attendee?

S: What stood out to me the most was that these doctors and vendors really wanted to hear what the patients had to say. I never felt like someone was asking for my opinion just to be nice or listening just to be polite. They seemed fully involved in what we, the patients, were saying. Being heard, as a patient, is honestly such a rare thing that to have people in places that can make life-changing decisions about our care hear what we have to say, is amazing.

L: Hearing about research that is ongoing as well as new technologies was very empowering, and left me feeling very encouraged about options available to those of us who have reached ESRD.

What was the most interesting takeaway for you?

S: As a patient the most interesting takeaway was that what I think and what I say really does count. As a person who loves research and used to do surveys and metrics for a living, the most interesting takeaway was that taking the time to craft a meaningful survey for patients is important. Turning data (survey results) into action (making a difference for the patient) is key.

L: Hearing about research that is ongoing for new technologies and ways to treat ESRD was most exciting.

What was it like to be able to interact with other patients who were attending?

S: It always helps to know that you are not alone. Even though we all have our own individual paths and we all fall on different places on the CKD continuum, we all have so much in common in how we feel and how we need to be heard. We can laugh at things that other people just would not understand. Kidney disease is not funny, but there is always some humor to be found in any difficult situation and being with like-minded people is good for the soul. Every single patient in that room is a hero. We all have a lot on our plate but we mustered up the strength to get ourselves to that conference to not only help ourselves but to help all those who come along after us. I know I was completely energized by being around everyone and at the same time could feel the drain of the illness that I deal with every day. It was worth every bit of energy it took to be there in Baltimore and I feel incredibly grateful that I was offered the opportunity to attend the conference. I made sure to thank everyone who played a role in getting me there and also to thank the other patients for sharing their stories and their thoughts and ideas.

I have been in my new community, Waterville, Maine, for about 2 1/2 months now. Going to the KHI conference in Baltimore made me realize that I need to be involved in my new town. I found a group walk in the downtown area (Waterville Walks! hosted by Waterville Maine Street), I attended a public health meeting as a member of the community (Healthy Northern Kennebec), and I participated in a workshop down in Hallowell, Maine at the Harlow Gallery (Healing Through Art: Confronting Your Inner Critic). My goal is to find out as much as I can about the resources that are available in this area. I understand that input from members of the community really is important and that the people asking for the input want to hear what people have to say. I am not surprised that so few people attend these community events thinking that they will be boring or useless, but I am doing my part to let everyone I cross paths with know that there is a lot to do out there, that there are unlimited ways to get involved, and that if you keep looking and put in some effort the resources can be found. I am grateful that the KHI conference has opened so many doors for me.

L: I love the interaction with other patients, and the opportunity to both learn and encourage others. I think it was important for many patients to feel they both have a voice and that our collective voices were not only being heard, but welcomed.

Stay tuned for Part II of this blog when we chat about what kind of planning it took to make this event as patient-centric as possible with those who ran it. And don’t forget to visit the site to connect with Samantha-Anne, Laura, and the nearly 1,000 other PatientsLikeMe members living with chronic kidney disease.

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A patient’s perspective: member Gary reports back from the FDA public meeting on Parkinson’s disease

Posted October 27th, 2015 by

Back in September, Sally Okun, Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety, and community moderator Molly Cotter, attended the FDA public meeting on Parkinson’s disease (PD) along with PatientsLikeMe member Gary (tupelo).

We posted some interesting developments from the meeting in the forum, but we also caught up with Gary for his perspective on the event. Here’s what he had to say:

Why did you want to be part of the FDA public meeting?

On the day I was diagnosed, back in 2012, I spent a great deal of time reflecting on my life. I thought a lot about how Parkinson’s disease will impact me and my family in the future. On that day I made a commitment to myself that I was going to take control, to the best of my ability, on the course of the disease progression, and would do anything possible to find a cure. I was determined to educate myself as much as possible about the disease, put together the best possible health care team, learn all I could about treatments currently in research, and participate in clinical trials. Parkinson’s was a new challenge in my life and I intended to tackle it like I would any other challenge that I had faced in the past. Along the way in this new journey, I became more publicly involved as a PD advocate, both for advancing research as well as supporting newly diagnosed patients. So, when I noticed the FDA announcement regarding the meeting, I decided to send in my comments and thoughts in hope that they might be helpful, to whatever degree, in moving research along for better treatments.

What did it mean to be accepted?

When I submitted my comments I never expected to be asked to participate on one of the panels, nor was I intending to attend the meeting, which was on the eve of a religious holiday. I was quite surprised when I was contacted by the FDA, but was caught in a dilemma. Participation meant missing an important time with my family. However, when we discussed it, we all agreed that this was such a great opportunity, and honor, to be able to represent the needs of the millions of Parkinson’s disease patients worldwide to the FDA. There was no way I could turn down that kind of invitation.

What was it like being there as a patient representative at the FDA event? Did you feel like your voice was heard?

I’ve participated in a number of seminars and conferences in the past, so there wasn’t much difference with the arrangement for this meeting. If anything, it was much more low key. Nevertheless, I definitely had a sense of awe when I arrived at the FDA complex. There were multiple buildings all over the sprawling campus. It immediately reminded me of the importance of this event compared to others I’ve attended. We were going to be presenting to the Director of the FDA’s Division of Neurology Products and nine other senior staff members. This is about as high up as we could go in our advocacy to advance Parkinson’s disease research.

During the meeting, it was difficult for me to tell how our presentations were going and whether they would have an impact on the FDA’s staff, although it appeared to me that they were listening intently. I was certainly concerned about the limited amount of time I had to speak. Several days later, though, I watched the webinar presentation of our event and I felt that we hit on the large majority of the most important areas of concern that our community has regarding current and new treatments. Only time will tell if the FDA will act accordingly with our hopes and suggestions. One small item that I noticed which suggests that they were listing involves a question on the Patient Questionnaire at the meeting. We were asked to choose from a list of Parkinson’s symptoms the ones that were most impactful on our lives. In my presentation, along with several of the other panel members, we noted that they didn’t include pain or orthostatic hypotension, two very common symptoms, on their list. I did, however, see that on the new follow-up survey the FDA is conducting, they have added both symptoms to the bottom of the list. So, at a minimum, they were listening as we spoke about these debilitating symptoms.

What did you learn while you were there?

Well, I can’t say that I learned much about the disease while I was there, but, of course, that wasn’t the purpose of the meeting. Our presentations were intended to educate the senior staff and decision makers of the FDA. That being said, what I did learn was the amazing dedication and effort that members of our Parkinson’s community will undertake in order to be heard at a forum. Members with severe difficulties traveled from all parts of our country in order to be able to speak for a few minutes. I was truly honored, and most definitely humbled, to be part of a panel with these dedicated individuals. If you haven’t yet seen the archived presentation of the meeting online, I suggest that you at least watch the members of the first panel speak to the FDA about their symptoms, it was amazing.

What are your hopes for future research in Parkinson’s disease?

We were asked by the FDA to limit our answers to their questions in the context outside of finding an actual cure. In addition, we were mainly directing our responses to the FDA’s role of controlling the approval and distribution of prescription drugs, more so than studying the potential impact of alternative therapies such as exercise, vitamins or other supplements, or the development of new medical devices to assist with symptomatic control (all of which are needed). So I’ll stay within that premise.

I see the need for a three-direction approach for future research. First, we need to continue and expand research into the biological science of Parkinson’s disease, as well as other neurological diseases with similar developmental processes, such as Alzheimer’s and ALS. With a better understanding of the disease cause, pathways, and progression, we will have a much greater chance of finding better treatments and potential cures.

Second, I would like to see research into the development of better symptomatic treatments. These treatments should be effective for multiple symptoms, have fewer disabling side effects, and have extended release and longer term activity. Although today’s treatments are somewhat effective treating motor impairment, they are greatly lacking in effectiveness for many other non-motor symptoms. Many of the drugs have side effects that can be more disabling than the symptoms they treat. In addition, it would be desirable for new treatments have ease of administration, such as oral, sublingual or inhalable as opposed to invasive surgery or device implantation.

Third, and most importantly, we need research to discover interventional treatments that can slow or halt the disease progression, if not totally cure it. This research should target the development of new drugs and vaccines that can intercede along all of the numerous biological pathways as the disease progresses. For example, we would find means to either stop the misfolding of proteins, prevent proteins already misfolded from accumulating in brain cells, or eliminate misfolded proteins which have already accumulated and are leading to cell death. Finally, I would like to see more research in alternative treatments, such as stem cells and human growth factors, in addition to traditional drug development. It’s imperative that the FDA allow our scientists to be as innovative as possible as they attempt to find treatments and cures for the most complex illnesses we have in brain diseases. With new interventional disease modifying drugs, along with improved symptomatic treatments and a proper exercise regimen, most, if not all of us dealing with Parkinson’s disease would be able to live active and productive lives for many years beyond our diagnosis.

For more information, check out the full video of Gary’s panel. And don’t forget to visit the site to connect with Gary and the more than 11,000 other PatientsLikeMe members living with Parkinson’s disease.

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Sally Okun explains the new research collaboration with the FDA

Posted June 16th, 2015 by

Yesterday, we announced a new research collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that will explore how patient-reported data can lead to new insights about drug safety. It’s the first time the FDA will analyze patient-generated data for pharmacovigilence (aka drug safety).

But we’re no strangers to drug safety. Check out some of the previous work the community has helped to drive:

To learn more about this new (and unprecedented) collaboration, we talked to our very own Sally Okun, Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety.

What will this collaboration do?
Patients’ lives and well-being often depend upon medical products approved and regulated by the FDA. But most of the information we see on safety labels comes from clinical trials, which aren’t typically representative of the actual populations of patients who will take the medication. Working with us, the FDA will be able to see the real-world impact of taking medications over time, which can help identify benefits and risks earlier. The FDA isn’t just talking about patient-centricity; they are partnering with us to work directly with patients, and give them a collective voice as part of the FDA’s surveillance system.

How does the FDA normally hear about side effects?
Right now the FDA uses a voluntary reporting system consisting of individual case safety reports, the majority of which are submitted by healthcare professionals and patients to drug product manufacturers, who then are required to report them to the FDA. Our data are different in that the information is generated by patients themselves, and provide real-time insights about what its like to use medical products over time, like tolerability of the drug and factors that may influence taking the drug as prescribed.

When did PatientsLikeMe’s start gathering information about side effects and adverse events?
We’ve actually been collecting information about patients’ experiences with treatments, including patient-attributed side effects, since we launched the website in 2006. In 2008 we took steps to formalize adverse event reporting by developing a customized version of the FDA’s MedWatch tool for use in a pilot project with our MS community. The pilot set us on a path to develop our future drug safety functionality. By 2009 we had created a fully integrated, standards-based drug safety platform, the first on social media. It enabled industry partners to meet their regulatory obligations.

What’s the future?
It’s pretty exciting! The patient experience can more deeply inform the way medications are regulated. And patient-reported data can ultimately have a greater impact on the way that drugs are developed. This collaboration can lead to all of that.

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PatientsLikeMe and the FDA Sign Research Collaboration Agreement

Posted June 15th, 2015 by

WASHINGTON D.C., June 15, 2015—PatientsLikeMe and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have signed a research collaboration agreement to determine how patient-reported data can give new insights into drug safety. Under the collaboration, PatientsLikeMe and the FDA will systematically explore the potential of patient-generated data to inform regulatory review activities related to risk assessment and risk management. The announcement was made at the start of the Drug Information Association’s (DIA) annual meeting in Washington D.C.

PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and President Ben Heywood said the agreement is an unprecedented step toward enhancing post-market surveillance and informing regulatory science. “Most clinical trials only represent the experience of several hundred or at most several thousand patients, making it impossible to anticipate all the potential side effects of drugs in the real world. Patient-generated data give a more complete picture about a drug’s safety by providing a window into patients’ lives and healthcare experiences over time. We’re very encouraged by the FDA’s action to evaluate newer sources of data to help identify benefits and risks earlier.”

The cornerstone of the FDA’s post-approval drug safety surveillance is a spontaneous reporting system consisting of individual case safety reports. Reporting adverse events to the FDA is mandatory for drug product manufacturers but voluntary for healthcare professionals and patients. The majority of these individual case safety reports are submitted by healthcare professionals and patients to drug product manufacturers, who then have regulatory requirements to report them to the FDA. The PatientsLikeMe data are generated in a different context by patients themselves, and provide important real-time insights into the nuances inherent in patients’ experiences over time, including drug tolerance, adherence and quality of life.

PatientsLikeMe is the largest and most active patient network online, with 350,000 members reporting on their real-world experiences with more than 2,500 conditions. The company’s drug safety initiatives began in 2008 with a pilot program that allowed patients living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) to report adverse events directly to the FDA. One year later the company launched the first drug safety platform on social media, enabling industry partners to meet their regulatory obligations. In all, PatientsLikeMe has collected more than 110,000 adverse event reports on 1,000 different medications, data that the FDA will now be able to access and analyze as a supplement to traditional sources, including FAERS.

While this is the first time that PatientsLikeMe has formally worked with the FDA, the collaboration adds to a foundation the company has built as an active participant in the regulatory science process. PatientsLikeMe has worked with, provided counsel to and co-authored discussion papers with a range of government groups, including the Institute of Medicine, the National Institute of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as well as nonprofit organizations such as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

About the FDA
The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
(781) 492-1039


PatientsLikeMe members to be highlighted in patient empowerment webinar

Posted January 13th, 2015 by

Many PatientsLikeMe members talk openly about the reasons why they donate their health data and why they believe patient-centered healthcare means better healthcare for all. And just a week from now, two of them will be sharing their stories with everyone in a live webinar.

On Tuesday, January 20th, at 2:00pm EST, the Partnership to Improve Patient Care (PIPC) is hosting their first “Patient Empowerment Webinar,” an online event focusing on the importance of patient engagement in their own healthcare and in health policy. Two PatientsLikeMe members, Ms. Laura Roix and Ms. Letitia Brown-James, will be participating in the discussion, and their experiences will be a part of the webinar. Here’s a little bit about Laura and Letitia, and more ways they’re already empowering others:

Laura is a member of the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) community on PatientsLikeMe, and she recently traveled to Maryland to speak at the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF.  Laura went with our very own Sally Okun RN, VP of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety and spoke about her journey and what it’s like to live with IPF. (She recapped her experiences in an October blog interview.) But that’s not all Laura shares – she’s a 3-star member on PatientsLikeMe, which means she is a super health data donor and always keeps her information up to date so others can learn from her.

Letitia has been living with epilepsy since she was little, but after connecting with the PatientsLikeMe epilepsy community she learned about new treatment options available to her, like surgery. She shared about her experiences in a video, and after receiving her surgery, she’s been living seizure-free for years. Letitia is also a part of the first-ever PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors, a patient-only panel that gives feedback on research initiatives and creates new standards to help all researchers understand how to better engage patients.

The PIPC webinar is open to everyone, so if you’d like to join, please RSVP to the event coordinator via email. Hope to see you there!

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“We are many” – PatientsLikeMe member Laura reports back on her experiences as a panelist at the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF

Posted October 17th, 2014 by

Just yesterday, you saw our very own Sally Okun RN, Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety, reported back about her experiences at the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF. And today, we wanted to share the patient experience. For each public meeting, the FDA invites patients and caregivers to apply to be a panelist and share their real-world experiences with the disease – and Laura (LaurCT) was selected to attend! So, along with Sally, Laura headed to Silver Springs, Maryland and spoke to the FDA about what life if really like living with IPF. Check out how it all went below.

Laura was officially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in May 2013, but was living with symptoms for years before that. She’s really an inspirational member of the community and always has her 3-stars (which means Laura is a super health data donor!).

Why did you want to be part of the FDA public meeting?

It was simple for me, I wanted to be part of the solution. When I was diagnosed with IPF I was quite the mess as many of us are. I’m a fighter. I just can’t sit back and do nothing. So, once I got over the total devastation I wanted to fight for me, for others and especially for my children. We all have our strengths and fundraising is not one of mine. I can stand up and tell how hard it is to live with this disease, not just medically, but the changes and decisions we all have to make that seem small to some but are huge to people who are living with this disease. It was important for me to be able to give back in some way to those that helped me through all this.

What did it mean to be accepted?

When I filled out the summary I felt no way will I be accepted so I’m not going to worry about it. When I received that email from the FDA that said, “We would like to extend an invitation to you to present your comments during the panel discussion on Topic 1,” I had to read it twice. My next reaction was of total humility, to represent so many patients on a panel and to tell people what we all face was such an honor. My next reaction was to share the good news with Sarah on PatientsLikeMe because I knew she’d be just as excited for me.

What was it like being there as a patient representative speaking at the FDA event? Did you feel like your voice was heard?

It was amazing! I wasn’t alone – there were 8 panelists who have been affected by this awful disease and 4 of us were IPF Patients. As panelists were speaking on their experiences, I would look at the FDA representatives and I could see that they were moved. That is what we went there to do and I truly believe we accomplished that.

What did you learn when you were there?

As many of us have had to do, I have had major changes this last year. Changes that really impacted me. After our panel was done there was a break and people were coming up to me and talking to me about their own experience or thanking me.  It was an unbelievable experience. I learned that I still could contribute in some way. It is good to know what we were doing was important. It gave me a bit of that feeling of accomplishment and purpose that I’ve been missing lately.

How do you feel about your pursuits as an advocate for IPF after having this experience under your belt?

I’m still whirling from the experience. I would love being an advocate for IPF, getting the word out is so important. I was just at the COE I go to for the clinical trial I’m in and I was telling them about my experience and showing them the pictures. There are opportunities to be interviewed by some doctors and the center said they would give out my name when the opportunity arises.

When I completed the summary for the FDA I thought ‘I can really do this!’ So, when I was asked to participate in an afternoon education session for 2nd year medical students at UCONN School of Medicine I said yes. The discussion will be on the impact of chronic diseases on patients and family. You can bet I will tell them the disease that I have. It’s exciting to get that word out so when they become practicing medical professionals and they hear idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or pulmonary fibrosis, they will hopefully remember what it is.

I just want to add the biggest thing the experience gave me. The in person support groups are few for IPF. In my area there is only 1 and it’s quarterly. The virtual support groups like PatientsLikeMe have been a life changing experience. Many of us feel compassion for each other and cry when they cry and laugh when they laugh and praise those who have accomplished milestones like increase in PFTs or Pulmonary Rehab. It was these virtual groups that got me to a COE and on my journey to living with IPF and not dying with IPF. It still brings me to tears remembering looking out into the audience and seeing over 100 IPF patients some that I have spoken to online and seeing them in person literally takes my breath away to know I really am not alone and that we are many. I got to talk to them in person.

The pictures – UGH! I hate my steroid looks but as Diane, another patient said, this is our new normal. So the selfies are there! Sally taking a picture of me at the FDA podium ~ we got to sit when we spoke with Dr. Lederer from NY Presbyterian Transplant Team, with Diane another IPF panelist and with Sally from PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe helps so many diseases online and we can think of it as just another online place and not realize there are people behind the scenes that really care for us. Meeting Sally from PatientsLikeMe and seeing her stand up and speak with such compassion about IPF puts a face to such a wonderful organization. I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity; you can’t imagine in a million years what it meant to me. I will be forever grateful.

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Sally Okun reports back from the FDA Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF

Posted October 16th, 2014 by

On September 26th I was at the FDA for the Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting on IPF. This is one of 20 meetings that the FDA is holding to learn directly from patients and their caregivers about daily life with the specific condition’s symptoms and treatments. (You can learn more about these meetings here.) I have attended a number of these meetings and often have meaningful data to share from our own PatientsLikeMe members. So far, however, the FDA has only allowed patients and caregivers to present and participate as panelists.

So to get as much of our members’ real-world health data in front of the FDA as possible, I take full advantage of the public comment period at the end of each meeting. It’s a short 3-5 minutes of time, but it’s a chance to share insights from PatientsLikeMe members and to reflect on some of what’s been discussed during the public meeting. In addition, we submit a full report to the FDA’s public docket that is open for comment two full months following the meeting. The report includes a community profile and the results of any polls PatientsLikeMe members have taken part in prior to the meeting.

This meeting was different
It was my pleasure and privilege to meet and spend time with a member of our PatientsLikeMe community who was selected by the FDA to be one of the panelists. LaurCT did an amazing job sharing her challenge in getting an accurate diagnosis – which took a number of years. She also shared with the FDA and all the folks in the room that she did not learn about the Center of Excellence for IPF located only an hour from her home from her now former pulmonologist after finally getting the diagnosis of IPF – she learned about it from other IPF patients on PatientsLikeMe. (Thank you for sharing Laura!)

Many in the room acknowledged that a cure may not be found in their lifetime but they also conveyed to the FDA a palpable sense of urgency for treatments to slow the progression of the disease to reduce their symptom burden and increase their ability to participate more fully in life. What was startling was how often people shared how the lack of knowledge about IPF among physicians – even among pulmonary specialists – led to delays in their diagnosis and for some resulted in misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

One specialist, Dr. David Lederer, co-director of the interstitial lung disease program at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City and well known to many patients in the room for his work in IPF, used his few minutes in the public comment period to call for therapies that help his patients “live longer, healthier, more normal and independent lives.” He provocatively said that “oxygen should be free” and called for more study of the benefits of oxygen combined with exercise which today are the only things that help people with IPF actually feel better. This was borne out in our poll as well.

A family thing
In addition, there is an important familial connection that many feel is not getting sufficient attention in research. One woman shared her family’s story starting with her father’s diagnosis and death followed by the deaths of each of his 4 brothers of the same disease. A number of people talked about family members who died over the years with similar respiratory symptoms and questioned whether they in fact may have died of undiagnosed IPF.

Your voices transformed
While the opportunity for patients to be heard cannot be diminished, I along with others in policy and advocacy circles remain concerned by the anecdotal nature of these FDA proceedings. At each meeting, there are a few polling questions with audience clicker devices, but there is no systematic way of transforming the very powerful patient narratives that are shared into meaningful and usable data. At PatientsLikeMe, your stories and your voices are best amplified and speak most loudly when transformed into data that is both meaningful and measureable.

All that said, it’s worth watching the free webcasts of the meeting, which you can find here.

PatientsLikeMe member SallyOkun

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Improving drug safety through the patient voice

Posted November 22nd, 2013 by

At PatientsLikeMe we’re interested in bringing the voice of our patients to the attention of those who make drug products and to the regulators that approve them. Since 2008 we have conducted a series of projects to collect safety information from some of our member communities. We’ve worked with our pharmaceutical partners to help them better understand the safety experiences of patients while they are using certain drug products.

I’d like to introduce you to a new acronym – P.R.O.S.P.E.R.  It stands for Patient-Reported Outcomes in Safety Event Reporting and it promotes the value of including patient experiences in monitoring the safety of drug products during clinical trials and after drugs are approved.

The PROSPER Consortium is co-led and supported by PatientsLikeMe and Pope Woodhead, a UK healthcare firm, with input from most global pharmaceutical companies, many clinical and academic groups, as well as regulators, researchers and patient advocates.

A report from the Consortium was recently published in the journal Drug Safety that provides guidance for using patient reported outcomes (PROs) for safety monitoring processes. These are just a few of the reports findings…

  • The patient perspective is an essential component of drug safety
  • Patient-centeredness and patient safety are emerging as core elements of any responsive health system
  • The potential clinical utility and value of real-world information obtained from real patients taking real drugs is great1

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted safety reports from consumers for 20 years through its MedWatch program, other parts of the world only accept reports on adverse reactions to drugs from health professionals. While patient reporting has recently been encouraged there remain skeptics who doubt its value.

PatientsLikeMe is part of the PROSPER Consortium because we believe the patient voice – your voice – is essential to improving the safety of drugs and medical products. As we look ahead to 2014, we’ll be exploring opportunities to amplify your voice across all areas of health care to improve safety, starting with the FDA and the EU counterpart, the European Medicines Agency.

PatientsLikeMe member MollyCotter


1 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40264-013-0113-z/fulltext.html


Patient-focused organizations join forces to build awareness and participation

Posted September 10th, 2013 by

The innovative medical research philanthropy Cures Within Reach has announced a marketing partnership with PatientsLikeMe to work together to improve patient lives.

Sep. 10, 2013 – SKOKIE, Ill — Cures Within Reach, a non-profit focused on research to repurpose existing compounds for new and immediate use, and PatientsLikeMe, a patient network and real-time research platform, are both thinking out of the box to help patients get what they need in today’s challenging healthcare climate.

Cures Within Reach (www.cureswithinreach.org) is dedicated to saving lives of patients with both complex and rare conditions by sourcing, funding and stewarding research that repurposes FDA-approved drugs, devices and nutriceuticals.  Anecdotally described as “teaching old drugs new tricks,” companies and research institutions rarely embrace this methodology due to low profit potential, while the potential for creating effective and affordable cures or treatments for patients is very high.  Ideas for these projects come from researchers, clinicians and sometimes patients themselves.

PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care.

The initial partnership will consist of cross-marketing programs to drive awareness and participation.  “Cures Within Reach is leading the way in a unique research model that makes a tangible difference for patients today.  We are happy to connect with an organization whose work so directly supports our patient community,” says PatientsLikeMe Executive Vice President of Marketing and Patient Advocacy Michael Evers.

Dr. Bruce Bloom, President and Chief Science Officer of Cures Within Reach, shares that moving forward, CWR will “find collaborations with PatientsLikeMe and their powerful patient community that not only increase awareness, but also ultimately strengthen each organization’s research work and patient impact.”

To learn more about PatientsLikeMe, visit www.patientslikeme.com

To learn more about Cures Within Reach, visit www.cureswithinreach.org