14 posts tagged “fatigue”

3 energy-saving tips for people with lupus

Posted March 31st, 2017 by

lupus fatigue tips

Fatigue can be a big deal when you have lupus. About 43 percent of PatientsLikeMe members with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are tracking fatigue as a symptom say that it’s “severe.” A rough day can feel like “walking through knee-deep water,” notes one member.

Here’s a roundup of energy-saving tips from a few different sources (spoiler alert: routines and planning ahead can help):

  1. A PatientsLikeMe member’s advice: schedule, schedule, schedule. “You can’t schedule too much with lupus because one activity can knock you out,” she says. “I learned to say no in advance to over-scheduling social engagements or things that would keep me out too late or keep me from getting enough sleep.” She also sets alarms and reminders on her phone to keep her on track, including one at 9:30 every night that says, “Time to unwind” – put away electronics, take meds and go to bed.
  1. Hint from a writer with lupus: manage your mornings. Heather Glantz, who has been living with lupus for more than 20 years, says it took her several years to nail down a morning routine that preserves energy for the rest of the day.

lupus fatigue tips

“I try to stay in bed as much as possible before I start my day, so my curling iron, mirror, brush and makeup are all in a drawer next to my bed,” she writes. She has a bench in her shower and stays seated on her bed when she gets dressed. She also avoids clothes that need ironing or have lots of buttons, zippers and buckles – every little bit of energy counts.

  1. More scheduling pointers from the experts at the Lupus Foundation of America:  
    • Balance busy times with periods of rest throughout the day, if possible.
    • Prep meals in advance, whenever you have a bit more energy.
    • Plan ahead for big events like the holidays – shop for gifts throughout the year.
    • Establish good sleep patterns. (PatientsLikeMe bonus tip: iPhones have a new “Bedtime” feature that reminds you when it’s time to hit the hay based on how many hours of sleep you’d like to get – pretty cool.)

Is fatigue a symptom you’re living with? Make sure you’re tracking it so you can see how you’re doing over time. Do you have a routine that helps you manage fatigue? Add a comment on what works for you.

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Coming together for immunological and neurological health in May

Posted May 12th, 2015 by

If you follow PatientsLikeMe on social media, you might have seen a few “Pop Quiz Tuesday” posts. Today, here’s a special pop quiz – what do fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have in common?

The answer is that they are classified as Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CINDs). And since 1992, every May 12th has been recognized as International Awareness Day for CINDs. Today, in conjunction with Fibromyalgia Awareness Month, it’s time to recognize everyone living with a CIND.

While fibromyalgia and ME/CFS are both CINDs, each is a little different. Check out some quick facts about each condition:

Fibromyalgia1

  • Affects 5 million Americans over the age of 18, and the majority are women
  • The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown
  • Common symptoms include insomnia, headaches, pain and tingling in the hands and feet

ME/CFS2

  • Affects between 836,000 to 2.5 million Americans
  • The large majority of people living with ME/CFS have not been diagnosed
  • There are five main symptoms of ME/CFS, as opposed to the more general symptoms of fibromyalgia:
    • Profound fatigue that impairs carrying out normal daily activities
    • Unrefreshing sleep
    • Cognitive impairment
    • Symptoms that worsen when a person stands up
    • Symptoms that worsen after exerting any type (emotional, physical) effort

But sometimes, living with a CIND can be hard to describe. Check out this short video to get an idea of the invisible symptoms of ME/CFS.

Today, you can share your support for fibromyalgia and ME/CFS on social media through the #May12th, #Fibromyalgia and #MECFS hashtags. If you have a chance, you should incorporate the color blue into your activities, anything from changing the background on your Facebook to shining a blue light on your house at nighttime.

And if you’ve been diagnosed with a CIND, join the community at PatientsLikeMe. The fibromyalgia community is one of the largest on the site – over 59,000 people are sharing their experiences, along with more than 11,000 living with ME/CFS.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for CINDs.


1 http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/fibromyalgia/fibromyalgia_ff.asp

2 https://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2015/MECFS/MECFS_KeyFacts.pdf