12 posts tagged “donation”

National Donor Day: Changing lives on both sides

Posted February 14th, 2016 by

“Be Mine.” It’s the mantra of Valentine’s Day, but today we’re honoring those who’ve said, “Have mine.” February 14 is also National Donor Day, and it’s all about recognizing the most precious valentine of all: the gift of life.

For every organ, tissue, marrow, platelet and blood donation, there are two sides to the story. Check out how two PatientsLikeMe members describe what it’s like to be offered another chance at a life, and how it feels to give that opportunity…

 

Life after a lung transplant

“I have a new normal now, but that is ok because I CAN BREATHE! It is something most people take for granted until they can’t. I know I did. The first year after transplant is rough to get the meds right … the frequent bronchoscopies. I had a setback with CMV virus and have had GI problems (med side effects) but have gotten it straightened out. In three weeks is my one-year birthday and I am positive I would not be here now if I didn’t get my new left lung.”

–       PatientsLikeMe member

The memory of her father lives on

“When my dad passed away, nine people were given a new lease on life from him!  We received several letters from family members. Most very simple thank yous and a little about the new life the recipient has now. Those letters mean the world to me, even all these years later. It’s like Dad lives on in the joy others now have.”

–       PatientsLikeMe member 

How can you help?

Every 10 minutes, a patient is added to the organ donor waiting list. So what can you do? Register to become an organ or tissue donor, find a local blood or platelet drive or join the Be The Match national bone marrow registry.

And if you have received an organ donation – or are waiting for one – you can reach out to the transplant community at PatientsLikeMe.

 

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PatientsLikeMe Encourages Sharing of Health Data for Good with 2nd Annual “24 Days of Giving”

Posted December 1st, 2015 by

The Gift of Health Data Can Help Others, and Advance Research

CAMBRIDGE, MASS., December 1, 2015—On this #GivingTuesday, PatientsLikeMe is once again celebrating “the new tradition of generosity” by encouraging people to donate something unusual but vital: their health data. Starting today and continuing for #24DaysofGiving, PatientsLikeMe is asking anyone who is living with a chronic condition to donate their health data after donating to their favorite non-profit.

PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that aggregates the health data members share so that others can see what’s working for patients like them, and what’s not. Health data includes information about a disease or condition—how people live with it, what their doctors are doing to treat it, and what it’s like to navigate their health journey. PatientsLikeMe also analyzes the donated data to spot trends in specific diseases and works with partners to incorporate patient-reported evidence in their research. Partners can then create new products and services that are more in tune with what patients experience and need.

Michael Evers, Executive Vice President of PatientsLikeMe’s Consumer and Technology Group, said that members donated a record amount of health data last year, the first time the campaign was introduced. “Tens of thousands of new and existing members answered the call by contributing treatment evaluations, symptom reports and other health updates. But they didn’t stop on the first day of giving. They shared their data over the course of the entire month, and continued to do so this year. I hope others will join us again so that everyone has the best information to make decisions, and we can continue to bring real-world perspectives to research.”

PatientsLikeMe plans to give back in several ways during the campaign. While it returns study results back to participants as quickly as possible, the company will once again showcase some of the most important research that has benefited from patient data in the last year and beyond. It’s also making a donation of up to $20,000 to Make-A-Wish Massachusetts and Rhode Island to help fund life-affirming wishes for seriously ill children.

Members use PatientsLikeMe for a range of reasons. For some, tracking their condition is the most vital. Allison talks in this video about living with bipolar II, and how she uses PatientsLikeMe to track her moods. “I haven’t had any episodes in the last five years because I have the data to link all the pieces together. I’m prepared because of PatientsLikeMe.”

Gus, who was recently diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), contributes his data to make sure others like him have a game plan for living with the condition. “The person who has just been diagnosed isn’t thinking about anything else. Their head is spinning. I want to create a manual so that others can understand what’s working for me and anyone else living with ALS, and make educated decisions to improve their quality of life.“

“24 Days of Giving” will be active across PatientsLikeMe’s Twitter and Facebook social media channels through December (#24DaysofGiving). Anyone who is living with a chronic condition can create a profile on PatientsLikeMe and start tracking their symptoms, treatments and quality of life. Existing members are encouraged to keep their profiles up-to-date or complete a new treatment evaluation. To learn more, go to www.patientslikeme.com.

About PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and non-profits develop more effective products, services, and care. With more than 380,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 70 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


#NotAlone: On PatientsLikeMe, no one is alone

Posted September 14th, 2015 by

Our co-founder Jamie Heywood calls it “the big idea my brother inspired.” A community of people learning from each other’s shared health experiences, connecting with people who get what they’re going through, and tracking their journeys to inform new research and help others understand what might work best for them. That is PatientsLikeMe, and that is what Stephen Heywood inspired.

Today, more than 350,000 members are part of the community, and through learning, connecting and tracking, they are #NotAlone.

Over the next few weeks, we’re launching the #NotAlone campaign that’s all about how members continue to learn from and support one another through life-changing conditions.

What can you expect to see from #NotAlone?
We’ll be featuring some inspirational stories to show how members have felt less alone on their journeys. Here’s a preview into the #NotAlone experiences of Letitia, Nola, and Geof:

  • After Letitia learned about an epileptologist on the site and discovered she was a perfect candidate for surgery, she’s been seizure free for 3 years.
  • When Nola’s multiple sclerosis kept her from accessing her shower, Gary, a member she connected with in the forum, stepped in to help from 3,000 miles away.
  • Geof uses Adderall to combat multiple sclerosis fatigue, but, three days before his prescription was up, his insurance company denied the claim. He turned to the community and everyone who had tracked their own experiences with Adderall.

How can you get involved?
Share your own #NotAlone stories – whether in learning, connecting or tracking. Visit the forum to chat about your experience or chime in on Facebook or Twitter using #NotAlone.

And don’t forget to continue adding your data and experiences on the site. Every piece of information can help change medicine for the better and show someone else that they are #NotAlone.

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Data donations make wishes come true

Posted September 10th, 2015 by

Back in December 2014, the PatientsLikeMe community donated 450,000 health data points during the 24 Days of Giving campaign, and a special thanks to everyone who participated and have continued to donate their data for good. Every donation made wishes come true for children with life-threatening medical conditions, and on behalf of the community, PatientsLikeMe made a $20,000 donation to Make-A-Wish® Massachusetts and Rhode Island, which helped Keith and Scarlett take a break from aggressive and uncomfortable treatments and doctors’ visits to go on faraway adventures with their families. Read about their stories below:

Keith
When 17-year-old Keith was diagnosed with lymphoma, his life was forever changed. Instead of fishing and playing sports, like he used to before he got sick, he now spends time in hospitals, enduring uncomfortable treatments. Keith longed to take a break from doctor’s visits and have a carefree vacation with his family; he wished to tour the Hawaiian Islands with his family on a Norwegian Cruise.

The PatientsLikeMe community made this happen! Once aboard the cruise ship, the crystal clear waters mesmerized Keith, as they took him to the Hawaiian islands of Kahului, Hilo, Kona, and Nawiliwili. Each new island provided a new world to explore. Keith and his family enjoyed pristine beaches, volcano views, whale watching and deep sea fishing.

Keith’s trip renewed his strength and hope for the future. He told Make-A-Wish Massachusetts and Rhode Island, “if you think about all the people who are emotionally going through so much because of what you’re going through, you become stronger than you can ever imagine. It shows your loved ones that there’s nothing to worry about.”

Thank you for donating your data and helping to give Keith and his family a vacation of a lifetime.

Scarlett
Though diagnosed with a brain tumor, three-year-old Scarlett wished to visit the TradeWinds Island Resort in Florida to explore the sea and the surf like her cartoon friends in her favorite movie, “Finding Nemo.” Scarlett and her family began their trip with a limousine ride to the airport. Upon arriving in sunny Florida, Scarlett tossed off her shoes to wiggle her toes around in the sand. She swam or built sandcastles on every beach – there was plenty for her to discover both in and out of the water. She even got to ride a giant waterslide and tried eating alligator meat at dinner.

Scarlett smiled all week long and her family savored quality time together. She had a week of carefree childhood. Scarlett’s mom and dad really enjoyed reminders of their daughter’s adventurous spirit.

Scarlett’s mom, Michelle, wanted to share with the caregiving community a few tips on coping with a young child who has a serious illness. Here’s what she shared:

When we were going through Scarlett’s treatment, people said to us ‘I don’t think I could do it’ and I always said to them ‘When you have to do something, you find a way.’ What were we going to do? Lay in bed and pull the covers over our heads? I would say:

  1. Don’t be afraid to accept any help that is offered (or ask for help) and don’t think people can read your mind. If someone asked, “What can I do?” I asked for specific things like “come keep us company during infusion weekends in the hospital” or asked for clothes when I was so stressed out that I lost weight and clothes for Scarlett after her surgery when she couldn’t pull a shirt on over her head.
  2. For couples – let one person be the emotional support and the other be the physical support. My husband is a nurse so he took care of making sure she drank plenty of water and ate plenty of fiber. I made sure that we still went to the park and birthday parties and lived life as normally as possible.
  3. My husband’s advice – drink prune juice and lots of water. Believe it or not, we probably saved her kidneys by giving her syringes filled with water all day when she didn’t want to drink. We kept her regular by giving her prune juice every day. Simple but very important.

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Talking brain donation with Dr. Deborah Mash

Posted September 1st, 2015 by

Dr. Deborah Mash is a professor of neurology and molecular/cellular pharmacology at the University of Miami School of Medicine. She’s also the director of the university’s Brain Endowment Bank, and she recently spoke with PatientsLikeMe about her research and exactly what goes into donating your brain to science. As she says, “we still know very little about that which makes us uniquely human” – read her Q&A interview below.

What led you to study diseases of the brain? 

The brain is the next biologic frontier. We have learned more about the human brain in the past twenty years than throughout all of human history. And, we still know very little about that which makes us uniquely human – our brain. I was always very interested in the anatomy and the chemistry of the brain and in disease-related Neuroscience. I consider it a privilege to study the human brain in health and disease.

How would you explain the process of brain donation to PatientsLikeMe members who might be new or uncomfortable with the idea of donating this organ to science?

Brain donation is no different than donating other organs after death. Organ and tissue donations can give life or sight to another person. Transplanted tissues are used in surgeries to repair damaged bones and joints. And these donated tissues are also important for research studies to advance best practices that are used by doctors. The gift of a brain donation supports research studies that will bring about new treatments, better diagnosis and ultimately cures for disorders of the human brain like Alzheimer’s disease, Autism, ALS, schizophrenia and depression, drug and alcohol addiction, bipolar disorder, and multiple sclerosis to name a few.

A brain donation does not interfere or delay a family’s plans for the funeral, burial or cremation. There is no cost to the family to make this final gift.

What brain bank research would you most like to share with the PatientsLikeMe community? Our ALS, MS, Parkinson’s and mental health members might be interested to hear about brain bank research for their conditions.

Studies of the human brain have led to seminal discoveries including the loss of dopamine neurons in Parkinson’s disease and the association of beta amyloid with Alzheimer’s disease. Without examining the human brain after death, these discoveries could not have happened. Medications for Parkinson’s disease were advanced because scientists identified the loss of dopamine that causes many of the symptoms.

We have new technology that provides an unprecedented opportunity to rapidly examine large-scale gene expression of human brain for the first time. This powerful approach can facilitate understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease that is usually fatal in five years. Motor neurons in ALS undergo degeneration, causing secondary muscle atrophy and weakness. Studies of ALS in human brain are beginning to identify multiple processes involved in the pathogenesis of ALS.

We have yet to fully understand the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS).

This disease is different for everyone who has it. The symptoms it causes and when they flare up is different not only between people but also throughout one person’s life. This makes the diagnosis difficult and complicates treatment. The science behind MS is slowed because there are too few brains donated for research. We get many more requests for well-characterized MS cases and too few brain specimens are available to support the research. This lack of donated brains from MS patients is a barrier for MS research.

Examining the brain after death is important to understand how well experimental treatments are working in clinical trials to see if the drug did what it was supposed to do. An autopsy follow-up on 13 patients from a recent Alzheimer’s drug trial showed that although the drug had cleared the beta amyloid protein, it hadn’t changed the course of the disease — an incredibly important observation needed to advance the direction of Alzheimer’s disease research. The same is true for anyone who participates in clinical trials for any brain disorder.

When you ask people (or their family members) to consider donating their brain to UMBEB or another brain bank, what do you want them to know?

A brain donation is a final gift that contributes to the health and well being of the next generation – your children and grandchildren. It is a very special endowment that lives on by advancing research that can lead to the next scientific breakthrough.

People who want to be organ donors typically sign a card letting others know their wishes, but brain donations require an additional pledge card. This is not always well promoted. How can PatientsLikeMe members who are interested in brain donation obtain the special brain donation pledge cards?

It is important to make your wish known by registering in advance. We make it an easy process and provide donor registration cards for your wallet. You can share this information with your family and friends. You can request information or become a registered donor by visiting us online at http://brainbank.med.miami.edu or call 1-800-UM-Brain.

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Recognizing National Donor Day

Posted February 14th, 2015 by

It’s Valentine’s Day, and besides flowers and candy, there’s a special way you can show somebody love today – by registering as an organ donor to give the most precious Valentine of all: the promise of life.

February 14th is also National Donor Day, and it’s all about recognizing those who have donated in the past and celebrating the lives of people who have thrived after receiving a transplant. To help, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has organized an awareness campaign including educational videos, stories of survivors and ways to participate today. If you haven’t already, search your state for an organ and tissue registry and learn how to become a donor. And don’t forget to share on social media using the #NationalDonorDay hashtag.

If you’ve received an organ donation – or are waiting for one – you can reach out to the transplant community at PatientsLikeMe and connect with members who have received heartkidneyliverlung or pancreas transplants, among many other types. You can also check out the extensive PatientVoice report on what life is like after a transplant and read about how PatientsLikeMe member Lori survived her lung condition through a lung transplant.

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MS members share about their PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ experiences

Posted October 15th, 2014 by

PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ is a way to celebrate our three star members (super health data donors) and sponsor them at events so that they can raise awareness for their condition. If you’re passionate about advocacy and you’re participating in a walk, run or other fundraiser on behalf of your condition, learn more and sign up right here. 

We caught up with three MS community members who are active participants in PatientsLikeMeInMotion. They shared about the events they’ve been a part of over the years, why advocacy is important to them and several ways PatientsLikeMe has helped them manage their MS. Scroll down to read what they had to say. 

Ajcoia 

“Since being diagnosed in 2002, and after my sister was diagnosed in 2001, I have participated and captained every event the Greater Delaware Valley MS Society chapter has offered. This includes the one-day walks, MS150, Muckfest MS and Challenge Walk MS. My favorite event is the Challenge Walk MS, in which I have participated all 12 years. I have met so many wonderful and inspiring people through this event, which brings me back year after year.

Advocacy is huge, because without voices out there speaking on our behalf, we would never get any funding or support. I have been to Washington, D.C. 3 times on behalf of the National MS Society, and I know that our stories being told to legislators help.

PatientsLikeMe has been a wonderful tool for support and also a great way to keep track of symptoms. I love that I receive valuable information about MS and data that they have collected. I also love that they support my teams and I when we participate in events, both monetarily and with their great tee shirts.”

Special1

“I have done the Southern California/Nevada Walk MS events every year since diagnosed in 2009. So I have participated in approximately 5 walks. The first year, I was not able to walk far because of fatigue and heat intolerance. The 2nd and 3rd year, I sat and cheered my team on. This year, I was so glad I was able to walk the 5k with my team of 32 members. We have grown from 14 members the first year. When I form the team, I always go with raising awareness and then concentrate on raising funds. The weather was cool this year, a great day to walk, and I am glad I was able to walk. Last year, the Beat MS Dance walk was started by “So You Think You Can Dance” member Courtney Galiano, and I participated in the event for the second time on Sep 13, 2014.

I have always been a people person, and since I have to be home so much because of symptoms from my MS, I love getting out and seeing new people, including people I meet online or through others. All have showed me that as long as I just keep doing what I CAN do in this new life of mine, I will continue to find reasons to smile. This last year one of our team members, a 16 year old, was diagnosed with MS, and it opened everyone’s eyes and reminded them that life can change at any moment. Value today.

I worked in the medical field for 15 years, and I medically retired due to cognitive issues. When working, I would push my patients to fight, whether it was high blood pressure, diabetes or any illness they were being attacked by. They would come back and thank me through the years. So when I was diagnosed the first year, I was glad to know I wasn’t just going crazy, but I didn’t know how to now be the patient. Slowly I fell into the role of patient, advocate and fighter. I have gotten calls from old coworkers to get info from me to give to patients who are newly diagnosed. Those calls made me a little sad, but also made me happy because I was still needed.

I first heard about PatientsLikeMe on a social media site. I signed on and connected with strangers who I now call friends, I log my meds and health info and sometimes print my health info out and take it with me to doctor’s visits. I like how I get an email asking me how I’m doing, and it’s so easy to use. PatientsLikeMe has also helped me raise awareness and funds for my walks and MS events since 2009.” 

CKBeagle

“I walk. I walk every day. I walk my dogs every day. I walk for my physical health. I walk to get outside for my mental health. For the past several years I have walked for the MS Society and I have the t-shirts to prove it.

Most recently, I have been a part of the Journey of Hope Walks that the MS Society uses to help provide additional funding for society-approved MS Clinics and MS Specialty Care Centers. Currently, I am team captain for our AbFab Concord Neurology Team for MS Specialty Care Center walk team. I know, bad name, but I had to make sure that everything was in there, especially the AbFab, because that is important. Why do I do it? I am not a neurologist. I don’t work for Concord Neurology. I don’t even work for Concord Hospital. I do volunteer at the “clinic” once a month as peer support. Did I forget to mention that I have MS?

The clinic is a wonderful service for patients with MS. On clinic days, they have the opportunity to meet with a neurologist, counselor, physical therapist, occupational therapist, social worker, nutritionist, MS Society representative and peer support to discuss any and all aspects of how MS affects their lives and how their life affects their MS. For the most part, I spend a lot of time asking questions and listening. I try to provide direction on what strategies I have tried to deal with different situations and offer an understanding ear for complaints. I encourage people to relay information to the doctor or therapists even if they think it is unimportant. I learn how other people are coping with the changes brought on by MS. I feel I get as much out of it as I give to it. We all have something to offer.

One of the things that I make sure to give people is the information on the PatientsLikeMe website. I have found it to be an interesting resource for information on treatments and also a way to track my health and attitude history. I especially enjoy the researcher interest on the site where you can provide input on treatments or general health through surveys.

On top of that, I LOVE the PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ program. It was how I first became aware of PatientsLikeMe. I got in touch with the community team, let them know when and where my walk was, kept myself as a 3-star patient and bam! I was accepted into the program. They made a donation to my walk and sent t-shirts for the team. Cool beans! The whole team loves the shirts and the donation helps the MS Society and the clinic. Now all I have left to do is the walk. For now that’s the easy part. Because I walk. I walk every day.”

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Today’s Photo: 2012 Ride for Dads in Minnesota

Posted September 28th, 2012 by

Earlier this month, we shared a video interview with PatientsLikeMe member Wayne Sticha, who founded the Ride for Dads in 2010 to raise awareness of prostate cancer.

Since September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we wanted to close out the month by sharing one of Wayne’s photos from 2012 Ride for Dads, which involved approximately 70 motorcycles, made five stops throughout Minnesota and generated $1,100 for the Prostate Cancer Foundation this summer.  PatientsLikeMe was proud to support this community event with a monetary donation and bright blue PatientsLikeMe t-shirts as part of our PatientsLikeMeInMotion program.

Wayne and Team in Their PatientsLikeMeInMotion T-Shirts

Congrats to Wayne and all of our PatientsLikeMeInMotion-sponsored teams for your efforts to raise funds and awareness for your condition. For more PatientsLikeMeInMotion team photos, check out our growing Flickr collection.

Thinking about organizing a team – or even founding an event like Wayne did?  Learn more about the PatientsLikeMeInMotion program today.


Today’s Photo: Raising Epilepsy Awareness on the National Mall

Posted June 18th, 2012 by

Summer is here, and that means there are disease-related walk/run events happening all around the country!

For inspiration, please meet epilepsy patient Monica (second from right), who led a PatientsLikeMeInMotion-sponsored team at the National Walk for Epilepsy in Washington, DC.  Held on March 31, 2012, the two-mile walk occurred between Madison and Jefferson Drives on DC’s famous National Mall.  “I do a lot of fundraising on my Facebook page, so my friends and family all know I have epilepsy,” says Monica.

PatientsLikeMe Member Monica and Team on DC's National Mall

Congrats to Monica and all of our PatientsLikeMeInMotion-sponsored teams for your efforts to raise funds and awareness for your condition. We’re honored to support you every step of the way.  For more PatientsLikeMeInMotion team photos, check out our growing Flickr collection.

Thinking about organizing a team for this summer or fall?  Learn more about the PatientsLikeMeInMotion program today.


Today’s Photo: Mama in Motion

Posted December 12th, 2011 by

Please meet multiple sclerosis (MS) patient hotmama08, who led a PatientsLikeMeInMotion-sponsored team that included two four-legged advocates at Walk MS in Columbia, SC, on May 14, 2011.  We especially love how the team member to the right wore bright blue shoes to match her PatientsLikeMeInMotion t-shirt!

Hotmama08 and Team at Walk MS 2011 in Columbia, SC, One of 600 Such Walks Across the Country

Congrats to hotmama08 and all of our PatientsLikeMeInMotion-sponsored teams for your efforts to raise funds and awareness for your health condition. We’re honored to support you every step of the way. For more PatientsLikeMeInMotion team photos, check out our growing Flickr slideshow.

Thinking about organizing a team for next spring?  Learn more about the PatientsLikeMeInMotion program today.


See the PatientsLikeMeInMotion Program in Action

Posted September 23rd, 2011 by

We’ve shared a lot of great photos on the blog lately of run/walk teams sponsored by PatientsLikeMeInMotion this year. Now you can learn more about this dynamic program in a more dynamic format with our new PatientsLikeInMotion video. Find out how to get involved, what sponsorship entails and how much PatientsLikeMe has donated towards our sponsored teams’ fundraising efforts since the program’s inception.

Ready to get out there and raise awareness and funds for your condition? Let us support you every step of the way. Sign up for PatientsLikeMeInMotion today.


Taking It to the Streets: The Spring PatientsLikeMeInMotion Report

Posted July 6th, 2011 by

PatientsLikeMeInMotion - Team Sponsorship Program for Disease-Related Run/Walk/Bike Events

Every year, PatientsLikeMe sponsors run/walk/bike teams around the country through PatientsLikeMeInMotion.

Led by a three-star member – someone with a complete health profile at PatientsLikeMe – each team receives bright blue PatientsLikeMe t-shirts, business cards and a donation towards their fundraising goal. Some of the events our members participate in include the Parkinson’s Unity Walk, the National Walk for Epilepsy (Epilepsy Foundation), the Walk to Defeat ALS (ALS Association) and Walk MS (National MS Society).

What’s happening this year?  2011 is off to a great start with 30 sponsored teams as of the end of June.  When you compare that to two years ago – when we sponsored around 40 teams for all of 2009 – you can see how the PatientsLikeMeInMotion program has grown.  Wondering whether any of these spring teams were raising awareness for your condition(s)?  Here’s the list of conditions represented for 2011 thus far:

We’re thrilled to support our members in this way, and we especially love seeing the positive connections that are forged when our members meet “offline” at these uplifting events.  That’s why we’ve asked PatientsLikeMeInMotion team members to submit their favorite photos from recent events.  Check out our Spring 2011 PatientsLikeMeInMotion Flickr Slideshow to see the enthusiasm firsthand:

We’ve also gotten some wonderful messages from team leaders this year that illustrate the impact of the program:

  • “Thanks so much for everything, I can’t wait to give the team their shirts and wear them with pride.  You all are awesome.”
  • “Thank you for sponsoring me in Walk MS! I am so grateful for your support, which brings me one step closer to achieving my fundraising goal. More importantly, it brings us one step closer toward a world free of multiple sclerosis.”
  • “Our team enjoyed the t-shirts and stood out in the crowd in the bright turquoise. We also enjoyed answering questions from those who asked about the t-shirts and the website, about which we gladly shared information!”

Organizing a run/walk/bike team for late summer or fall? Sign your team up for PatientsLikeMeInMotion sponsorship today. (Please allow 3-4 weeks lead time.)

PatientsLikeMe member mcotter