8 posts tagged “diet”

Keeping it fresh for heart health month

Posted February 7th, 2017 by

Did you know February is Heart Health Month? And although heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in America, it’s also one of the most preventable diseases. In the spirit of heart health month, let’s raise awareness together – make healthy choices day-to-day, get to know your family health history and get regular check-ups to give yourself the best chance of staying healthy, longer.

Here’s something to get you started today – a tasty (and heart healthy) recipe from the American Heart Association.

 

Balsamic Glazed Fish

Ingredients

  • 4-4 oz fillet fish
  • black pepper
  • 3/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice

 

Directions 

  1. Heat Oven to 450 degrees.
  2. Season fish to taste with pepper. Place on a cookie sheet or in a 9 x 13 inch casserole dish and bake 10-12 minutes.
  3. While the fish cooks combine remaining ingredients and whisk well. Microwave covered on 50% heat for 2 minutes, stirring half-way.
  4. Drizzle glaze over fish and serve.

Know of any other delicious and healthy recipes you can share? Let us know in the comments or join the discussion in the forums.

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Food for thought: August (diet) edition

Posted August 12th, 2015 by

Many mothers have told their children “you are what you eat,” but some PatientsLikeMe members have taken that idea one step further and are using their diets to try and manage the symptoms of their conditions. People have been sharing about everything from gluten-free to vegan diets – check out what some people said in the conversations below:

“I truly believe, after 50+ years of fibromyalgia symptoms ranging from pain and depression to migraines, irritable bowel, and low thyroid, that the biggest help of all is to watch my diet, get in lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit sugar and alcohol. I supplement my fruits and veg intake with a whole food based supplement. This has allowed me to reduce medication to thyroid supplementation and a very occasional sumatriptan.”
-Fibromyalgia member on her “detox” diet

“My diet is greens, beans, nuts and seeds. Favorites are kale, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, sweet potatoes, black, pinto and kidney beans, lentils, black-eyed peas, cashews, almonds, peanuts and pistachios, flax and pumpkin seeds. I also have occasional sweet potatoes, apples, oranges and watermelon. Grains are consumed about once a week and are usually Farro or Quinoa.”
-Diabetes II member on his vegan diet

“With all my meds and other things I take for depression and the DBS, I can’t say that a gluten-free diet has been particularly whiz-bang helpful. However, I think it may have slowed my symptoms or made me feel better than I should.”

“I am also trying to stay as gluten-free and sugar-free as possible. It is a daunting exercise each day, but may be worth it long-term. I believe that diet plays a huge role in all disease states. All we can do each day, realistically, is take one day at a time and note any positive changes in our PD symptoms to gauge how we are benefitting.”
-Parkinson’s members on their gluten-free diets

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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Food for thought: August edition

Posted August 28th, 2014 by

Are you trying to lose weight in time for the fall? Or are you hoping to gain a few pounds instead? Weight fluctuation is a part of everyone’s life, and PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about their weight management in the forum, everything from the Primal Blueprint 21-day diet to alternative substitutes for pasta and carbs. Read what everyone is saying.

“Finished my first week on the diet, I lost 3 lbs and my psoriasis is not as bad, it has cleared up a little…I do miss carbs though.”
-IPF member

“I think I would very much like to increase my fiber intake in the form of soup made of tolerated vegetables. I think soup will be much more easily digested than some other ways of increasing fiber and maybe cause me less problems, I hope.”
-MS member

“I’m Italian, so that’s a major problem with Type II! I can’t go very long without a dish of pasta. Does anyone have a REAL suggestion for a substitute? Or am I going to have to tempt the fates once a month or so and have a dish of pasta? I tried spaghetti squash. It was like eating shoelaces!”
-Diabetes type II member

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And don’t forget to check out our other Food for Thought posts if you missed them.


Food for thought: June edition

Posted June 18th, 2014 by

For the past couple months, we’ve been sharing about different members’ favorite foods and recipes, and we’re keeping it going with multiple sclerosis members discussing the pros and cons of smoothies, ALS patients talking about getting sleepy after steak, and the fibromyalgia community sharing about cutting foods out of their diets.

MS forum thread: Nutrition questions anyone?

“And on the other hand, some people, (myself, for instance) have resistance to green smoothies…”

“We love green smoothies. I think they taste best if you use 1/3 green stuff, 1/3 banana, and 1/3 other fruit, like berries, peaches, etc.”

“I can understand the value of smoothies, which have all the fiber blended into the drink, but juice? Not only no, but hell no.”

ALS forum thread: Could a steak make you lethargic?

“I get really tired after chewing. Steak would knock me out!” 

“My hubby has always asked for steak dinners since his dx. He says it makes him feel more energetic.”

“Try really small bites and/or mix with mashed potatoes.”

Fibromyalgia forum thread: gluten/sugar/alcohol free

“I have cut out soda and now drink seltzer water. (I like the bubbles).”

“I had to cut out the alcohol, sugar, red meat and a gluten free diet.”

“It has not been easy. I have on numerous occasions opened that cupboard door to the chocolates but then just closed it again.”

 

 


Food for thought: April edition

Posted April 15th, 2014 by

Everyone’s got a favorite dish (pizza is one of ours), and many PatientsLikeMe members share a bunch of their recipe ideas and foods in the forum. So, we’re going to start highlighting some of the hottest – or maybe the coolest, if you like gazpacho – conversations on the blog as part of a new “Food for thought” series. We’ll be featuring what people are saying in different condition communities.

So, what are people talking about this month?

Fibromyalgia forum thread: What did you make for dinner tonight?

“Leftover sage and rosemary soup, added mushrooms and scrambled egg batter. Stirred until cooked, added sea salt and pepper. Yummy!”

“Crock pot lamb shanks and salad.”

“A protein bar and yogurt – not hungry.”

Type 2 diabetes forum thread: High early morning blood glucose readings

Try having a low carb high protein snack at bedtime. This usually helps me have a lower reading in the morning. I have a really grainy piece of toast with peanut butter or cheese and it works wonders.”

“I eat my dinner at 4:30 or 5 p.m.  I also watch my carbs.  That helps me get the sugar down in the morning.

“At night for a snack and hour or so before bed I might have a piece of celery with peanut butter.

Multiple sclerosis forum thread: Different diets and reactions

“I have to say, the flavor of grass-fed beef is far superior to that of the ‘conventionally raised’ beef.”

“I have gone with the Mediterranean diet and it seems to have helped me physically. Not so much neurologically, though

Does any of that sound familiar? If you are living with fibromyalgia, diabetes type 2 or multiple sclerosis, join PatientsLikeMe and jump into a conversation in the forum, or start a new thread of your own. Sharing experiences has never tasted so good!


Rediscovering Life’s Simple Pleasures: An Interview with a Heart Patient

Posted October 10th, 2012 by

Learn About World Heart Day 2012

Last week, we recognized World Heart Day on the blog and discussed why there is an urgent need for awareness about heart disease and stroke, the world’s number one killer.  We also talked about how heart disease can be an abstract concept until you are exposed to someone’s personal story.

That’s why we are pleased to introduce you to Alan, a PatientsLikeMe member who is living with congestive heart failure (CHF) following a heart attack.  A few years ago, he had a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) – or a battery-operated mechanical pump – surgically implanted to help his heart continue to pump blood to his body.  What has he learned from his experience, and what’s his lifestyle like today?  Find out that and more in our interview.

1) Tell us about your heart attack and how this journey began.

I suffered a heart attack some twelve years ago. While working in the yard one very cold afternoon I had “cold sweats” and a very sore throat. I started feeling better and decided to go to work the following day. Late in the morning of the second day I began feeling much worse and called my wife and told her she needed to pick me up and we should go to the hospital together. I told my wife and the triage nurse in the ER that I was developing pneumonia.

After a short time in the ER a technician came in and conducted an EKG. He immediately told the other personnel in the ER that I was exhibiting “tombstone T’s.” I was rushed to the Cath Lab and had a stent inserted into a vein in my heart. I never suffered any of the “classic” signs of a heart attack (crushing chest pain, pain in my arm(s), losing consciousness, losing the use of any extremity, etc.) Eight weeks after the stent implant I had open heart surgery (aorta valve, four bypasses, repair aortic aneurysms, etc).

2) What’s your lifestyle like today with your implanted LVAD?

Living with the LVAD has changed for the good and for not so good. I am somewhat limited in what I can do and not do, as opposed to my pre-LVAD life. There are activities I absolutely cannot do, and some I choose not to do. I cannot swim, bathe or shower without a special waterproof bag for electronics, fly the airplane we owned, drive fast cars and fast boats, hunt in the mountains, or bass fish in Mexico and South America. I have found that I can cook, watch grandchildren graduate from high school and college, watch great grandchildren come into the world and watch them grow and change.

3) What’s been the most unexpected part of your experience?

The most unexpected part of the heart disease journey was discovering that it did not take a club and a ball, a gun (shotgun or rifle), a rod and reel, flying an airplane, going off to fish and/or hunt, owning a fast car, etc., to be happy. Some of the other things I discovered were: vacations do not have to be long (distance and duration), they just have to be taken with someone you deeply care for, and who deeply cares for you; you discover which of your friends are sincere and true, and endeavoring to be a true and sincere friend in return; and many of the simple pleasures in life have been lost along the way in life’s journey.

Soaking in the Sunset:  One of Alan's Rediscovered Pleasures

4) What do you want others to know about their hearts?

Hopefully, even if it is only one person, what I say here might preclude that person from making the same misguided and poor decisions I made concerning diet, lifestyle, stress and the “things” it requires to be happy.


What Do You Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

Posted February 9th, 2012 by

February is AMD/Low Vision Awareness Month, sponsored by Prevent Blindness America.  Affecting part of the back of the eye called the macula, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can cause the center area of your vision to become blurry or wavy.  It can also create a blind spot right in the center of your vision.

As the name implies, your risk for AMD increases as you age.  Affecting more than two million Americans, AMD is the leading cause of vision loss for Americans age 65 and older.  That’s why it’s critical that you get a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, even if your vision seems perfectly fine.  Just like glaucoma, signs of AMD – such as a straight flagpole seeming slightly curved or wavy – may be easy to miss at the beginning.

February Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Low Vision Awareness Month

The cause of AMD is unknown, but risk factors include age, race, smoking, family history, cardiovascular disease and hypertension.  Diet may also play a role according to the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary.  For example, high fat intake (from meats, margarine, dairy products and baked goods) is associated with an increased risk of AMD, while people who eat fish (high in omega-3 fatty acids) more than four times a week have a lower risk of AMD than those who consume it less than three times a month.

Think only seniors have macular degeneration?  The data at PatientLikeMe suggests that it’s not just something to think about in your sixties and older.  Of the 56 patients who report macular degeneration at PatientsLikeMe, 39 of them (approximately 65%) are under the age of 60.  What are they doing to prevent further vision loss?  Some of the commonly reported treatments include the prescription drug Avastin as well as dietary supplements such as Zinc and Vitamin E.  (Click each treatment name to see how our patients rate the effectiveness, side effects, cost and more.)

Don’t let life get wavy on you.  If you’re overdue, have you scheduled your next dilated eye exam?


PatientsLikeMe® Poll Reveals Patients Share Health Data Online Prefer to Keep Quiet With Doctors, Employers

Posted April 13th, 2011 by

screen-shot-2011-04-13-at-123447-pmPatients Unveil Top Reasons Not to Share Health Information

CAMBRIDGE, MA–(Marketwire – April 13, 2011) – According to a new PatientsLikeMe® Poll, almost one in three (29%) patients have withheld certain health information from their doctor. Of the 4,364 poll respondents, all of whom are members of PatientsLikeMe’s online health data-sharing community (www.patientslikeme.com), nearly half (47%) indicate that they have chosen not to share certain health information with an employer, while 14% have withheld information from insurance companies.

“Here’s a population of arguably the most open patients, who share detailed data about everything from their treatments to their sex lives on PatientsLikeMe, and yet some of these individuals feel uncomfortable sharing with other stakeholders in healthcare,” says Jamie Heywood, co-founder and chairman of PatientsLikeMe. “If we’re all going to make healthcare better, then it’s time we really understand what’s keeping patients from sharing information. That insight is crucial to improving the system.”

In their poll responses, patients also identified some of the reasons why they chose not to share their health information. Patients’ unwillingness to share certain information with doctors is driven by more emotional triggers. Almost half (44%) say they didn’t tell a doctor about something related to their health because they “didn’t want to be lectured/made to feel bad;” second to that was fear of embarrassment (36%). What aren’t they sharing with doctors? Respondents said symptoms (41%), lifestyle information such as “diet, alcohol, exercise, or smoking” (39%) and failure to take a prescribed medication (29%).

Alternatively, the majority of patients who withheld information from an employer cite more practical implications. Sixty six percent (66%) of patients indicate the top reason as being “none of their employer’s business,” but nearly half (49%) say they are afraid of losing their job and about one-third (35%) are afraid of not getting a promotion. Finally, the individuals who kept certain health information under wraps from their health insurance companies report they did so out of fear of losing coverage (39%), fear of not having a specific treatment or procedure covered (39%) or fear of premiums going up (25%).

The complete PatientsLikeMe® Poll results can be downloaded here.

NOTE TO EDITOR: All poll results must be sourced as originating from PatientsLikeMe®.

Poll Methodology
Between March 22nd and March 29th, PatientsLikeMe invited all members who had been active on the website within the past 90 days to participate in the PatientsLikeMe® Poll; 4,364 members completed the survey. Mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD 12, range 13-84).

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is the world’s leading online health data sharing platform. PatientsLikeMe® creates new knowledge by charting the real-world course of disease through the shared experiences of patients. While patients interact to help improve their outcomes, the data they provide helps researchers learn how these diseases act in the real world and accelerate the discovery of new, more effective treatments. [Follow company news on Twitter.com/PatientsLikeMe and http://blog.patientslikeme.com]

PatientsLikeMe member lscanlon PatientsLikeMe member dwilliams