46 posts tagged “diabetes”

Member Chris finds the uplifting side of type 1 diabetes

Posted February 23rd, 2017 by

“I am the only 7-fingered diabetic record-holding powerlifter and motivational speaker you know!” Chris (ChrisRuden) says in his profile. He was born with two fingers on his left hand and a shorter left arm. He was bullied in high school, and he struggled with depression, alcohol and drug use.

Chris was diagnosed with diabetes at age 20, when he was in college studying law. His diagnosis inspired him to shift his focus to health and wellness (personally and professionally), and he earned a degree in Exercise Science and Health Promotion from Florida Atlantic University. He runs an online nutrition and fitness coaching business and he published an e-book called The Art of Losing Body Fat. He holds four state records in powerlifting (with one hand)! He is also a motivational speaker who has given talks at schools, businesses and organizations like the American Diabetes Association across the U.S.

We recently caught up with Chris about his interests, overcoming adversity and the upshot of his diabetes diagnosis.

What are your three favorite things to do? What do you love about them?

I love powerlifting, speaking and helping people get in shape! Powerlifting allows me to compete against myself and push my limits. Learning to lift properly as an amputee and learning to stabilize my blood sugar while lifting with diabetes was tough. But I love the challenge and satisfaction of working towards a goal and achieving it – no matter how long it takes. Speaking is my passion because I get to share stories that help people overcome hardships in their lives. Speaking allows me to be honest and real with the audience. There is nothing better than people writing me months after a talk or seminar about how they are still motivated and fueled by my talk. Helping people get in shape online is my business, but it is also my passion. I know what it is like not to be confident in your body, and I get the chance to help people with that mental and physical struggle daily.

How did growing up “being different,” as you say in your profile, shape your life? Has it helped you adjust to life with diabetes?

I was bullied and picked on for being different. I tried to stay strong as much as possible but it was hard and depression did get to me. It took a while to figure out that other kids or teens who would make fun of me for something I can’t control probably have a lot of personal issues they are dealing with. I focused on doing the best I could with what I had, and that philosophy carried over into my diabetes management. I was mentally prepared to handle the burden of diabetes because I knew it took the right mindset to thrive.

Could you share your diabetes diagnosis story with us? Why do you consider your diagnosis “the best thing to ever happen” to you? 

I was actually working in the ER at the time I was diagnosed. Weeks prior, I had been going to the bathroom 20+ times a day and I was so thirsty and irritable. My mom worked for a urologist in the same building so we did a urine test just in case, and I was admitted to the hospital with a blood sugar of 510. If it weren’t for diabetes, I would’ve never switched my major from law to exercise science, I wouldn’t be working with other type 1’s in the community, and I wouldn’t have found my true calling in life.

It seems like defying limits is a big theme in your life. What are some limitations that you’ve shattered? What motivates or inspires you to live this way?

Limits are problems and all problems have solutions. I have broken a few state records in powerlifting, deadlifting over 600lbs when the original limit was thought to be: “I can’t deadlift because I’m missing a hand.” Playing drums by sticking a drumstick through a glove finger hole was another limit. I also shoot guns, go fishing and occasionally rock climb. Some might see that as overcoming limits; in my case I just call it living.

What advice do you have for someone dealing with multiple health issues or going through a rough patch with their health?

Keep going. Think logically on what you can do on your part. Do the best you can with what you have where you are right now. By focusing on what you can control and not what you can’t control, life becomes a little more clear.

As a new member, what’s your experience on PatientsLikeMe been like so far, and what are you most interested in learning more about going forward?

I love the community and I’m really interested in just learning about other peoples’ perspectives and how they manage daily. I love to see people succeeding, regardless of how big the success or how hard the obstacle.

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Meet Lindsay from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

Posted February 9th, 2017 by

 

Meet Lindsay (Shyandspicy), a member of the PatientsLikeMe 2016-2017 Team of Advisors living with bipolar II, fibromyalgia and diabetes. We recently caught up with Lindsay to learn how she finds purpose in her relationships with her family, her faith and helping others. 

Keep reading to get to know her story and how she tackles the obstacles of living with her conditions through research, self-advocacy and connecting with others.

What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face?

There used to be not much that could give me joy or even make me smile. Now I can say one of my biggest joys in life is bringing pride to God and my family and other supportive loved ones. I have put them through a lot of strife and knowing that they recognize my hard work and attempts at trying to correct the past and become a better version of me brings joy. Along with that, I get a smile on my face when I spend time with my son, who is 13 and my little sister, who is 30 years younger than me. Experiencing life again through their eyes has a whole new meaning!

What has been your greatest obstacle living with your conditions, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges?

Stigma and high functional ability are the greatest obstacles. Because people can’t physically notice all my diagnosed illnesses on a daily basis (bipolar II, fibromyalgia, diabetes and other mental health illness) due to me being so highly functional. I have been denied much-needed services such as disability and compassion among others because I can mask how severe I am at times due to societal expectations of being what is normal. Society needs to start to recognize that we all are different and experience some different type of hurts/traumas in our lives but some of us can’t recover as well from those things. That does not make us less than. Instead of shaming us for displaying a need for help, society needs to encourage and applaud the strength in getting help. It starts though with ourselves not feeling embarrassed about our illnesses, whatever they may be, then family and friends and hopefully society.

How would you describe your condition to someone who isn’t living with it and doesn’t understand what it’s like?

This is hard for me to answer because many of my conditions (diabetes, fibromyalgia, mental health illness) are not seen and overlap. The best way to describe I think is that I know I have the potential to do great things, but mentally, physically and emotionally I struggle so hard to achieve this. First, I constantly talk myself into waking up in the morning, moving around, taking medicine, getting dressed, eating, overcoming fears, slowing down on taking on the world, filling out paperwork, and other basic skills that people tend to take for granted. I am a high functioning person so I’ve adapted to societal ways, but physically I’m in constant pain, the kind where every joint, etc., feels like a train has hit me and nothing I can do takes it away. Mentally, I am in constant battle of trying to build myself up while tearing myself down, remember little tasks and trying not to be confused (because I am intelligent and it makes no sense that I can’t remember simple things anymore). Emotionally, I am constantly finding exits, bathrooms, etc. in case I have a “melt down” so I can do it in private. I act cold, inappropriate and ruin relationships because I misunderstand things emotionally. All because I don’t want to be a bother or appear weak.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone newly diagnosed with a chronic condition, what would it be?

Research, research and research. I am a big reader and nerd already, but the one thing that has helped me is knowing what I am talking about when I go into the doctor’s offices. They may not believe you because some doctors are not up on research, but at least I know what tests I should ask for, medicines I should try and treatments to seek. If you can’t get it from a certain doctor, be an advocate for yourself. Just because one doctor says one thing, doesn’t mean it is entirely true. You can always change doctors, hospitals, etc., I never understood that. Another thing is keep track of symptoms, changes, etc. It helps to know when your condition is getting worse or better.

How important has it been to you to find other people with your condition who understand what you’re going through?

Very important. Without finding PatientsLikeMe.com in April 2016, I think my life would have been very different at this point. This site has given me courage, comfort and belonging. That was my major piece missing in my recovery of self, a sense of belonging…and finding non-judgmental and understanding strangers who get it is rare. This site brings everyone together and then some!

Recount a time when you’ve had to advocate for yourself.

I am always having to be a constant advocate for myself with doctors and my state funded insurance. It is SO frustrating and many times I want to give up, but I know no one else is going to do it and something needs to be done. Here is an ironic situation I run into a lot: I have applied for bariatric surgery 5 times. I’ve been denied 5 times due to mental stability, yet I need multiple test services, etc. and when I go to get the prior authorization, I am denied stating I need to just lose weight. Hmmm…interesting. You won’t pay for the surgery, you won’t pay for the coverage to get better sleep to lose weight, but will pay for me to see a doctor at least 5 times a week and 21+ pills a month. I also just had my 7th surgery on my knee. I am going to continue to fight because it makes no sense. Just because I have state insurance and I am overweight does not mean I should get unfair treatment.

How has PatientsLikeMe (or other members of the PatientsLikeMe community) impacted how you cope with your condition?

Because of PatientsLikeMe, I have found a new desire to become a better patient and to be there for other people who are not aware that there is hope for their condition. I started on this site because I was tired of how I was being treated as a patient and I found hope on PatientsLikeMe and comfort with other members. It brought me out of my depression at the time. Any time I talk to someone, (and this was before I was on the Team of Advisors) I would tell them about this site because I felt it was just a great way to not feel alone anymore and to get knowledge. I’m able to cope better knowing that if I am having a bad day other people will be supportive and give well wishes or advice. That is so comforting when you are depressed…just knowing someone in this world cares.

What made you want to join the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors?

I wanted to help other people like others have helped me on this site.

 

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