2 posts tagged “communication system”

Communicating with ALS: From devices to voice banking

Posted January 17th, 2018 by

 

Difficulty with speech and communication is a frustrating reality for many living with ALS. From apps to devices and voice banking, communication is a popular topic (as in over 35k conversations) on PatientsLikeMe, so we took a closer look into some of the options out there for pALS.

Tablets: Windows vs. iPad vs. Android

Trouble with typing or hand weakness? Amy, an augmentative communication specialist at Forbes Norris ALS Research and Treatment Center, recommends Windows (8 or 10) and Android tablets:

  • Windows devices have USB ports which makes them the most compatible with accessories like a mouse, joystick, eye tracking or head tracking device.
  • Androids may be compatible with these accessories as well, but often require a USB adapter. Adaptors are specific to the Android port and are inexpensive and easy to find online if you search for “USB adapter” and the make and model of your Android device.
  • iPads don’t offer these accessory options that use a pointer because their screens don’t display a mouse cursor. They do offer switch scanning access methods (a system by which a series of choices are highlighted and can be selected by hitting/activating a switch) for people who can’t use their hands on a screen or external keyboard. Some pALS find scanning too slow compared to cursor movers like a mouse or eye tracking.

Text-to-speech apps:

If you have difficulty speaking, there are many app options that convert text to speech:

Want to know more about communication devices? Check out Amy’s tips for paying for your tablethands-free options and message and voice banking.

Voice banking:

Many people with ALS who experience problems with speech, voice, and communication choose to preserve their voice for future use.

How does voice banking work?

Voice banking is a process that allows a person to record a set list of phrases with their own voice, while they still have the ability to do so. The recording is then converted to create a personal synthetic voice.

When the person is no longer able to use their own voice, they can use the synthetic voice in speech-generating communication devices to make an infinite number of words and sentences. The “new” voice isn’t a perfect replica of the person’s natural speech, but it will bear some resemblance.

Want to bank your voice?

Check out these options:

ModelTalker: A software designed for people who are losing or who have already lost their ability to speak. It allows people who use a Speech Generating Device (SGD) to communicate with a unique personal synthetic voice that sounds similar to their own voice.

Message Banking: An app that enables you to record and save messages in your own voice that can later be imported into a Speech Generating Device (SGD) or several tablet communication apps.

VocaliD: A platform that creates unique vocal identities for any device that turns text into speech. From just a three-second sample of sound that you make, the app can match you with a speaker from its voice bank and blend your vocal sounds with their recordings. Check out this moving video to see how voice banking changed the life of one man living with ALS and gave his family a piece of something they thought they had lost forever.

How much does it cost? Recording and banking your voice is free with programs like VocaliDMessage Banking or ModelTalker. With VocaliD, you only pay to download and use your synthesized voice. Pricing starts at $1,199.

When should you bank your voice? VocaliD recommends that you bank your voice sooner rather than later. With two options from VocaliD, you can bank your voice no matter where you are in your speech loss:

  • BeSpoke Voice: For people with speech impairment who are able to record three seconds of sound.
  • Vocal Legacy: For people who want to preserve their voice for the future and are able to record several hours of speech.

Have you banked your voice? Do you use a synthesized voice? Join PatientsLikeMe today to share your experience.

 

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Spotlighted Blogger: ALS Patient Rachael of “Notes to Self”

Posted December 19th, 2011 by

ALS Blogger Rachel of "Notes to Self"

Welcome to the third installment of our new blog series featuring patient bloggers. Last week, we introduced you to Parkinson’s blogger Steve, and today, we’d like you to meet Rachael, a three-star member who has been a part of PatientsLikeMe’s flagship ALS community since the very beginning. In fact, she joined PatientsLikeMe in May 2006, just two months after being diagnosed with this progressive neurological disorder (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease). Her blog is called “Notes to Self,” and it’s a candid and charming journal of the full life she leads, despite her condition.

1.  What role does your blog play in your life?

As the title suggests, my blog is [filled with] “Notes to Self.” I use it as an aide memoir and an excuse to be verbose as my voice fails me. It is useful to direct people who ask about events in my life when repetition of the story would be tiring. I also find that it helps me to work through my often complicated emotions in dealing with the disease and its incumbent challenges.

2.  Tell us about using an eye gaze system to write your blog posts and more.

As I have blogged on many occasions, the Eye Gaze System [a communication system directed by eye movements] is invaluable to me. I was fortunate enough to get the system before my voice and keyboard dexterity gave up entirely. I have become used to using it, and the transition has been less traumatic than it otherwise might have been. Low-tech communication is all very well in an emergency but cannot compensate for speech.

The Eye Gaze allows me to converse on an almost level footing, conveying thoughts and observations, expressing myself in my own style with all its complexities and idiosyncrasies. The Eye Gaze also allows me to indulge my “inner geek” and access the Internet and Skype to communicate with far flung friends and family.

3.  You’re a big user of the InstantMe tool at PatientsLikeMe.  Why?

I have always been quite an obsessive character. I am possibly overworking the PatientsLikeMe facility. I find it of immeasurable help to have a diarized record of my progression as it relates to my daily life. I tend to ramble, so I find the strict regimen of 140 characters helpful.

A Snapshot of the InstantMe Survey Rachael Takes Daily at PatientsLikeMe (Click Through to See Her Latest Entries)

A while back, I worried about my memory loss. I had a test done, and it showed no signs of the frontal lobe dementia that terrified me. My consultant reassured me that my short term memory loss was within “normal” parameters. To me it was still unacceptable. Because I have so many small things to remember that people without this condition would find insignificant, something has to give. Having a log helps my recollection. It is also useful for caregivers to reference and saves me effort and energy that I often do not have. It makes my clinical review a whole lot easier and accurate.

4.  In your last post, you talk about reconnecting with friends you’d pulled away from.  Tell us about that.

When I was first diagnosed, I was given the usual prognosis “18 months to live”. Some friends ran away but I realize now that I also withdrew from many people in my struggle to come to terms with the disease. 18 months has come and gone a number of times. Over time I had to re-evaluate my response. Instead of planning for dying I needed to plan for living. Part of this included giving people the opportunity to be involved in my life.

It is, on reflection, a patronizing thing to withdraw friendship without at least offering the choice. Life with ALS is difficult, but the challenges are not insurmountable. I thoroughly enjoy my life and my friends both old and new. Anyone reading my “InstantMe” [history] will know that I have an active social life and a busy home.