5 posts tagged “chemotherapy”

What’s in your “chemo bag”? Gearing up for lung cancer treatment

Posted May 18th, 2018 by

Chemotherapy is one of the most common treatments for lung cancer, so the community on PatientsLikeMe is chatting about what’s helpful to pack in a bag for chemo appointments (join PatientsLikeMe to take part in this lung cancer forum discussion).

Everyone’s experiences, side effects and preferences are different, but here are some items that people who’ve had chemotherapy say they’ve brought with them:

  • Sweatshirt and other comfy layers, in case it’s cold in the clinic (tip: a v-neck shirt and a hoodie with a zipper can offer easier access, if you have a central line or port
  • Fuzzy socks and/or close-toed shoes
  • A favorite blanket and pillow from home — although the clinic probably has these on hand, it can be nice to have your own
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste, in case you get a bad taste in your mouth (sometimes called “metal mouth”)
  • Anti-nausea aids, like ginger candy or “pregnancy lollipops”
  • Bottled water or whatever you like to drink (some people say iced green tea settles their stomach) — to help you stay hydrated and prevent dry mouth
  • Hard candy to suck on (fruity, minty or whatever you like)
  • Snacks to graze on (some clinics provide snacks, while others just provide water and coffee)… food is fine, as long as your care team hasn’t told you to fast for some reason, such as a CT scan
  • Lip balm to prevent chapped lips and mouth sores
  • Laptop, tablet or other mobile device, complete with earbuds and some entertainment (shows, movies, music, apps, or podcasts) downloaded in advance, just in case there’s not a good Wi-Fi connection available
  • A book or magazine (some people don’t feel well while looking at screens, so it’s nice to have printed copies on hand)
  • Adult coloring books and colored pencils for relaxation/entertainment
  • A journal, to help you write out some of your feelings (bonus tip: Michigan Medicine offers free guided-imagery/meditation MP3s to help people manage the emotions that come with cancer treatment)
  • A close friend or family member — someone you feel very comfortable with (and who can drive you when you’re tired after your treatments)

Learn more from these resources:

Have any ideas to add? Or just getting started with treatment? Become a member to connect with 9,000+ people with lung cancer and talk about topics like this.

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2 immunotherapy treatments in the news: Imfinzi and Keytruda update

Posted May 10th, 2018 by

Two immunotherapy treatments — Imfinzi (durvalumab) and Keytruda (pembrolizumab) — have made headlines recently in relation to lung cancer treatment. What’s the latest? Here’s an update.

Expanded FDA approval for Imfinzi

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved Imfinzi as a bladder cancer treatment in 2017. Imfinzi is marketed by AstraZeneca.

In February 2018, the FDA approved Imfinzi for some lung cancer cases — specifically for patients with “stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC] who are not able to be treated with surgery to remove their tumor, and whose cancer has not gotten worse after they received chemotherapy along with radiation (chemoradiation),” the American Cancer Society (ACS) explains.

A few more details on Imfinzi, according to the ACS:

  • The goal of treatment with this drug is to keep the cancer from getting worse for as long as possible (researchers call this “progression-free survival”).
  • The new approval for Imfinzi was based on a randomized clinical trial of 713 people, which found that those who received the drug had an average progression-free survival of 16.8 months compared to 5.6 months for those in the trial who did not receive it.
  • Imfinzi is a “checkpoint inhibitor” drug that targets and blocks the PD-L1 protein to help the immune system recognize and attack cancer cells (learn more about PD-L1 here, and read about possible Imfinzi side effects here)

The new approval for Imfinzi applies to very specific cases of NSCLC, but Reuters says it represents “a chance to intervene earlier in lung cancer,” since other approved immunotherapy treatments are tackling advanced or metastatic cancer.

Positive research on Keytruda + chemotherapy

Keytruda is another “checkpoint inhibitor” immunotherapy treatment that’s already on the market but making big headlines, thanks to new clinical trial findings.

Research published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that Keytruda is useful in combination with standard chemotherapy in the majority of patients diagnosed with an advanced form of lung cancer — specifically those with previously untreated metastatic nonsquamous NSCLC without EGFR or ALK gene mutations.

“Doctors already prescribe Keytruda to patients if a lab test shows that they are likely to respond to this drug,” NPR reports. “But Merck, the company that makes it, wanted to find out how the drug works in patients who aren’t obvious candidates as determined by that blood test… It turns out that Keytruda, in combination with standard chemotherapy, also works in patients even if they have a low score on the lab test, which measures something called the tumor proportion score for PD-L1.”

The phase 2 clinical trial involved 616 patients with advanced lung cancer from medical centers in 16 countries (check out this PatientsLikeMe guide to clinical trials and drug approvals).

“The findings, medical experts say, should change the way doctors treat lung cancer: Patients with this form of the disease should receive immunotherapy as early as possible,” The New York Times reports, along with more details on the research.

Check out PatientsLikeMe member’s treatment evaluations of Keytruda (pembrolizumab) here (become a member for access to more information). And see our previous round-up on lung cancer research and treatments (with many studies still ongoing).

Full disclosure: PatientsLikeMe is currently partnering with AstraZeneca on research projects. We’ve also partnered with Merck in the past. The article above is not sponsored – this topic has made headlines lately and we like to share relevant health news to help keep our communities informed. Questions about our partnerships? At PatientsLikeMe, we’re all about transparency so check out who we’ve worked with here.

Looking for more information on patients’ experiences and treatments for lung cancer? Join PatientsLikeMe today to connect with 9,000+ members with lung cancer.

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