5 posts tagged “art”

Patients at work: Member Nancy on being her own boss

Posted January 10th, 2017 by

We recently launched a blog series about patients who’ve started (or are gearing up to launch) their own businesses, sparking a discussion around how to manage your health without giving up on your career goals.

Say hello to Nancy (@spicerna), who sat down with us to discuss how she finds a balance between living with bipolar I and expressing her creative side through her art. Nancy chatted with us about the kinds of projects she likes to work on, and why it’s important for her to be her own boss: “I need a job where I am the boss every day. There is an unpredictable nature about the illness…not a day that goes by to where I am not making judgment calls to maintain my health.”

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your diagnosis experience?

I have struggled with symptoms of Bipolar I, since I can remember. I really noticed the ups and downs in the teen years. And at age 16, I had my first psychotic break, (1 out of 5 breaks in my life.) I have always been an overachiever and had big dreams and goals for the future but the combination of everything that I needed to succeed broke me. My body and mind couldn’t handle it. There was never a balance of my life. I never took a break I was a workaholic. I slept just 3-4 hours a night most nights. I had as many successes, as I did years of crash and burn.  It was just hard for me to work a mainstream job. I can’t do deadlines very well, stress triggers Mania. I was in complete mania working a full-time job and going to school for 7 years of my life then in a complete depression for 8+ years as I worked each day to recapture my life. Since I had 5 times of extreme psychosis. It wears on your body. I just had to begin plans to do a 180*. I was choosing the path to the most resistant and not enjoying the ride along the way. There were many things that I was doing wrong. I needed the balance, peace of mind; love for myself and to not live in extremes.

I have a certificate in residential planning and I planned on having a career in kitchen and bath design but that is high stress and the 180* was to find that my hobbies and being an artist is more of a goal and where I should be headed now. If I could make that work and market it to make some income. Then I can kill two birds with one stone I could have my success and support myself and take care of my illness at the same time.

I need a job to where I am the boss every day there is an unpredictable nature about the illness there is not a day that goes by to where I am not making judgment calls to maintain my health. I have to take many brain breaks clear my mind. That gets in a way of a full time every day job.  So to work at my own pace is crucial. So I can work around my mind.

How did you first get into making art? What are some of your favorite projects?

I started cross-stitch at age 8 at the same age I would draw in 3rd grade floor plans of my favorite houses that we vacationed at. In high school I took drafting class. I was very into residential homes and design. Through school I loved anything design and art related and at age 12 I determined that would be my life goal, I wanted to get into homes and design the plans for them. Well that idea evolved and now the goal is to be an artist and create art for people’s lives. It took a long time to make that distinction. I guess that is part of the process of the journey.  My cross-stitch was an obsession growing up. I made over 45+ pictures most of them were gift to friends. By working with my hands and heart it was a release to use the needle and thread, very healing. Then after a while after I chased after my career for a while I realized that I wanted to get involved with other mediums so with no money for school I began to teach myself using YouTube for advice other mediums, to illustrate for cards and create paintings. Wherever my ambition will lead. I am interested in paper, wood and fabric. I am defiantly in the experimental stages, working on many different projects to see where that may lead.  Right now, I am drawing and gravitating towards architectural element and gardens.  The sky is the limit.

Where have you been able to sell your art so far? What are your plans for growing a business out of it in the future?

I was making and illustrating some cards for people around me I would go to market and sell my cards just for the experience and wow they sold like hotcakes and had some people pay $10 for one card and there were orders for batches of 12 cards for Christmas and finally I just got warn out with all the work and found better ways to market my cards. I have one idea to sell and make good money buy illustrating my cards then making copy’s at the printers then selling or making silhouettes on the Internet for Cameo cutting machine sell the rights to the company and then when people buy my silhouette on the web I get paid a percentage I liked that idea. All of this is going to take me a long while to manifest I am becoming an expert in my own field so I am gauging down the road. 

How does living with bipolar affect your creative process?

When I am in mania my mind is racing the world it is so much deeper and broader and I have so many ideas. I have so many ideas but there not concrete. On the meds I struggle with similar issues as in mania; plus to focus, concentration, comprehension, low energy. I do think clearer on the meds but the symptoms never go away. It takes much strength to break down and be in the mood to do art so I am surprised when I look over my work and see so much progress.  So maybe once a day do a little bit. It is hard when your mind is choreographing dance songs in my mind and you know how to make that happen but all the details of the work and learning everything to piece that together. I don’t have energy for that. But it goes through my mind. All I know I can do anything I set my mind too there is just isn’t enough time for it all in this lifetime. Sometimes I think that I have the illness to keep me down to earth instead of a balloon flying off into the universe I have so much internal power.

On the flip side, does the process of making art help your manage your health?

Art is passion: it is metaphysical and spiritual. It takes you places. Color, and creating: helps release your mind. It keeps me occupied, during this life we call on earth.  It take’s skill and the process of learning, growing and creating that specific look is a life long job so fascinating to find.

I can manage my health by getting to a place to where I feel at complete peace and feel like I am doing my calling in this world. I feel depressed and moody if I am not doing that. I need Art in my life.

Do you have any advice for others with chronic illnesses who wants to start their own creative businesses?

Do it for fun first for years then add the buying and selling part. That is what I am doing? I feel more prepared to sell my work that way. Do your research about the business end and start with small classes to help you understand the business world. Become and expert first and then the process will be less stress on you. Owning a Business is a risk and you want to do what you can to succeed.

Most of all love you and have some faith. There is power within your heart that is just waiting to break through. Believe in that every moment of every day. Love yourself first and foremost and love others around you. Give to them in increases the harmony. Don’t get trapped in the hole of oppression and burden, get out!! Then you can succeed in all area of life and be ready for your own business.

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Patient Advocacy: An interview with artist and activist Regina Holliday

Posted November 22nd, 2016 by

Regina Holliday wears many hats. She’s an artist, activist, speaker and author, and she’s painted hundreds of patient stories on the backs of jackets in an ongoing art project called The Walking Gallery.

Through her art, Regina promotes better care, treatment and transparency in healthcare. She’s been an advocate of PatientsLikeMe for quite some time (two of her paintings hang in our office!), and shares our belief that patients and their providers should work together as a team.

Today, we’re sharing a recent interview from Regina Holliday’s Medical Advocacy Blog. Check out what she has to say about the role of a patient advocate, the importance of choice in healthcare and the impact art can have:

“It is very easy to push aside someone’s story, if that story is only the bullet point on a slide or the footnote in an academic article.  It is much harder to look away at the painting on someone’s back, screaming at you like so many wheals and welts.”

 

How would you define the role/responsibilities of a “patient” advocate?

The patient advocate can be defined in several ways.  Sometimes this is an official staff member in a facility.  They can operate as a patient navigator or customer service operative.  In the best scenario, their job is to help the patient understand the processes and options in care within the facility.  In the worst scenarios, the patient advocate operates as a tool of damage control to damper litigious action of distraught family members.

Sometimes the patient and family hire a patient advocate from a registry like the AdvoConnection. In this case the advocate may be a nurse, a doctor, or a trained and experienced caregiver who helps the patient while hospitalized or at home. They obtain medical records, ask questions, keep notes, help patients make their own difficult medical decisions, and review and negotiate medical bills.

Often the patient advocate is a close friend or family member who is not paid for their service. This advocate provides many of the same services as a paid advocate, but often is learning on the job. Occasionally they have a background in medicine, and use that knowledge to great success helping the patient ask the right questions and get appropriate care at the correct time.

Finally, there are patient advocates focused on policy.  I am often classified among this category, although I prefer the term patient activist.  A patient advocate focused on policy attends local, regional, state, and federal meetings to provide a patient perspective in policy decisions.

*(This is by no means meant to be an exhaustive definition of a patient advocate. Just how I define it in response to this question.  There are several other resources out there to learn more, like this one.)

** (Additional edits were made on 10-5-16 to clarify the responsibilities of patient advocates in relation to the AdvoConnection.)

You do a number of these sorts of speaking engagements and presentations around the country. Are there some unifying themes — clear trends — you see, common ideas that many people share about their worries or attitudes toward health care? Patient safety? Patient advocacy?

I have been attending medical conferences and public meetings for the past seven years. In that time I have watched HITECH legislation morph and change.  Patient access to data at stage one of Meaningful Use had budding teeth and at stage two it got poor fitting dentures.  I have watched the ACA become the law of the land, only to see constant steps to repeal it.

I watched the concept of patient engagement grow from a demand in small healthcare meetings, to a hashtag on twitter  (#patientsincluded), to trend of conferences inviting patient speakers.  I hoped that the next step was true partnership in decision-making and design.  Sadly, of late I have often heard that “patient engagement” was out of fashion.  We are now onto MIPS and MACRA and massive ACO’s.

I have watched patient safety advocates work for years with very little attention paid to their cause. I was happy to see Value Based Care begin to role out, as it addressed so many concerns of these advocates.  I am saddened to hear how many attendees at conferences expound on their love for fee for service.   Or twist the intended purpose of reducing readmissions, by leaving patients in hallway for days to be “observed,” but not admitted after complications.

The most apparent trend of the past seven years is that there are powerful lobbyists in this industry that will do anything to keep the status quo alive and well in healthcare.  There are also amazing individuals, often on Twitter, (check out #hcldr), that will not stop fighting for the patient voice and the positive disruption that comes when data silos are leveled and technology is used appropriately.

Will patients ever be like consumers of other products? Outside of elective procedures or choosing a birthing place/option, how much real consumer choices do patients have in their health care? How would you like to see those avenues expanded or re-routed?

I hate the word “consumer” when applied to healthcare; it assumes we take and never give.  Partnership in care requires two-way communication.   Care is always about choice.  When we embrace price transparency, a patient can decide which facility has the most affordable MRI procedure.  When we have medical record data transparency coupled with a clinical trials database, a cancer patient can decide the best personal path for their care.  Which may include a hospice path, if that is their choice.

We have a choice right now.  The difference in healthcare is that we have to fight for that choice, whereas in retail it is expected that customer will decide which items to buy rather than the shopkeep.

Regina Holliday during a visit to PatientsLikeMe in September 2016

How would you like to see health care systems and hospitals–particularly public and teaching systems– involve patients or their advocates in meaningful aspects of care best practices, policy making and priority-setting?

Patients, caregivers, and patient advocates need to be present in meetings throughout the facility.  For far too long we have been forced into the role of lobby designers.  We ask that you invite us to take part and provide appropriate recompense for our time.  Or schedule the meeting after the workday is done at the facility.  That would be fine.  Then everyone at the table can be the unpaid volunteer that patients and family caregivers are so often asked to be.

You might want to make sure we can have those meetings next to a playroom though, so our children can play together while we work together to create new policy. Because whether you are a patient or a provider, childcare is expensive.

How would you describe your painting style and approach?

My art looks like the work of the children’s book illustrator Garth Williams and the activist painter Diego Rivera fused.  As a few people have told me over the years,  “Your work is often sweet and disturbing at the same time.”

Describe the healing benefits and/or the impact that making art that tells stories about health care can have on patients, survivors, care providers?

As far as a healing benefit, the art process is a type of meditation and that can help soothe the soul.  It is a very nice feeling to be in the zone and at one with the cosmos.  But the creation of art could feel like a nail ramming through my hand, and I would still create.  I use art as a tool and the goal is to impact others.

It is very easy to push aside someone’s story, if that story is only the bullet point on a slide or the footnote in an academic article.  It is much harder to look away at the painting on someone’s back, screaming at you like so many wheals and welts.  To know this image is someone’s story. To look at the painted eyes that look into yours and seem say, “I died, and it is all for naught if you do not act.”

Are you alright? by Regina Holliday

Of all the art you’ve made–your Walking Gallery, the murals — can you choose one piece and describe it and explain why it’s a piece that you especially want to share?

My favorite piece is “Are you alright?”  In that painting, I captured my late husband Fred. He stares at me from that painting like he is still with me.  Still alive on pigment covered canvas.  Still urging me to help him, a patient.

And every day I do exactly that.

 

 

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