2 posts tagged “amy”

Getting to know our Team of Advisors – Amy

Posted May 13th, 2015 by

We’re been introducing the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors on the blog over the past 6 months, and today, we’re happy to announce Amy, a member living with a rare genetic disease called Fabry. Below, she shares about the importance of being aware of patients as individuals, and how she’s learned to live (and thrive!) with Fabry.

About Amy (aka meridiansb):
Amy is currently on the Patient Advisory Board for Amicus Therapeutics where she serves as a patient voice for researchers as they work to develop a new drug for Fabry Disease. Amy is a great champion to have in your corner, with a self-reported ‘wicked sense of humor’, and passion for connecting others to the right resources and information. She has experience advocating for others as a medical social worker, and believes in the importance of getting to know a patient population, writing materials that they can relate to, and understanding how managing their condition fits into their life as a whole. Her tip for researchers and healthcare professionals: “Remember, not everyone fits into neat categories. Those that fall outside of what’s typical can be an invaluable resource when researching a particular condition.”

Amy on patient centeredness:
“Patient-centeredness means that above all else, you have an awareness of the patient as a unique human being, because diseases don’t exist on their own, they happen to people. It means not always doing what is easiest for the doctor or researcher, but what is appropriate for the individual. It means being open-minded and adaptable, not everyone fits in a neat little box. It means not treating people like they are stupid just because they don’t have a medical degree. People know their own bodies, and live with their condition day in and day out and if doctors and researchers don’t listen they can miss crucial information that can help many. These days people have access to a lot of information, and they want to be treated like partners in their care not problems to be solved seen only through the filter of illness, and certainly not like a nuisance because they have an opinion about things.”

Amy on the Team of Advisors:
“Being a member of the Team of Advisors at PLM has been an incredible experience. Having had to quit school and work due to illness, I felt at times that everything I had achieved was for nothing and that I had nothing to offer to this world, which was beyond discouraging. Being a part of the Team of Advisors has given me a meaningful way to use my knowledge and experience to help shape the way physicians and researchers interact with patients. The first time I sat in a room with the team and the wonderful people at PLM I felt a sense of hopefulness that it was all happening for a reason. It taught me that even when your path is diverted by something out of your control, you can find a new path; there is good to be found in every circumstance even when you can’t see it right away. I feel lucky to have served on the Team of Advisors with such a diverse and passionate group of people.”

Amy on having a rare disease:
“Having any illness can be confusing and overwhelming, but when 95% of the doctors you see haven’t even heard of your disease, it can be exasperating and daunting. Having a rare genetic disease, Fabry, has presented me with an even greater need to advocate for myself and others with my same condition. I’m lucky enough to have a background working in hospitals as a medical social worker, so I am no stranger to advocacy and I have no problem speaking up; but this isn’t the case for everyone. Upon my mom’s diagnosis, and then my own, I quickly jumped onto message boards and support groups for Fabry, only to find there are many more questions than answers. I am lucky to have access to a geneticist that is familiar with Fabry, but most people don’t. Because our disease is so rare, many people are hundreds of miles from anyone else with Fabry. In person support groups aren’t really an option, so the internet and learning from each other on social media is crucial. I spend a lot of my time gathering questions from other people with Fabry and working them into my appointments, then reporting back to the message boards. Others do the same, and together we find our way to new tools to manage our lives with Fabry, new things to ask our doctor’s about, and new resources to call upon in trying to figure out this disease. In addition, I try to support others in being assertive with their doctors. I think we have been deeply conditioned in our society to respect authority and education, which is not inherently bad, but it can create an obstacle to honest communication with our health care professionals. It can be really intimidating! You try telling a person with 8-12 years of medical education and years of practice experience that you would like to teach them about a medical condition they don’t already know about! Some egos are better equipped than others to handle the learning curve required in having me as a patient. I ask a lot of questions and I expect good information in return. I always come from a respectful place, as I don’t expect every physician to know about Fabry, but I expect them to be open to learning about it. Some are more than willing and some aren’t and I’ve had to “break up” with my fair share of doctors who weren’t willing. But really, if they don’t care to continue growing as a provider, then I don’t really want them as my doctor anyway. So really, you have nothing to lose by setting high standards for your providers. But you have a lot to lose by remaining in the care of a doctor that wants to treat you like everyone else. You are not just like everyone else! You can miss out on valuable information that can seriously affect your care. So speak up, be respectful, but be assertive. And if you don’t feel that your needs are being met, cut your losses and find someone that does. You are the only one that can make those decisions for yourself! And if you need some moral support, just message me!”

More about the 2014 Team of Advisors
They’re a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members who will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process.

So where did we find our 2014 Team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The Team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions.

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“Focus on making small but meaningful changes” – an interview with Amy Campbell

Posted March 25th, 2015 by

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Good Measures, a company that combines the expertise of dietitians with state-of-the-art technology to help people improve their eating and exercise habits. Before joining Good Measures, Amy worked for almost 20 years at Joslin Diabetes Center, an internationally recognized diabetes treatment, research and education institution.

Amy, you have an impressive background – former nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet, just for starters. As a certified diabetes educator, you’re aware of the media buzz around the new cholesterol guidelines. What does this mean for people with type 2 diabetes – and those at risk for it?

Cholesterol guidelines have always been somewhat confusing. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert panel that provides recommendations to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, has done their homework and really examined the evidence around dietary cholesterol. The good news is that, for the first time, the committee is really downplaying the role of dietary cholesterol. In other words, for most of the population, eating foods that contain cholesterol has little if any effect on blood cholesterol levels. This is great news!

Whether or not eating eggs affects our cholesterol levels is awfully fuzzy for many people. As both a dietitian and a health professional advisor for the Egg Nutrition Center, this probably comes up a lot. What’s the latest wisdom?

For many years, health professionals, including doctors and dietitians, advised their patients to limit or even avoid eggs due to their cholesterol content. But a number of important studies have shown that dietary cholesterol (cholesterol found in food) has little effect on blood cholesterol levels. In fact, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee have dropped their recommendation that Americans limit their intake of cholesterol from foods, such as eggs and shrimp.

The data is a little less clear in terms of how dietary cholesterol might affect people who have type 2. But again, there’s no need to cut eggs out of a diabetes eating plan. In fact, if anything, eggs are a great addition because they are carbohydrate-free, rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Eggs provide many other important nutrients, as well, such as iron and vitamin D. Plus, they’re budget-friendly nutrients, as well.

Any specific suggestions for foods to eat or avoid if you want to reduce the level of “bad” (or lousy or LDL) cholesterol?

Although there’s some controversy surrounding saturated fat and how “evil” it really is, studies do show that this type of fat, found in red meat, cheese, whole milk and butter, for example, can raise LDL cholesterol levels. However, there are foods that can lower LDL cholesterol. These include foods high in soluble fiber, such as oatmeal, oat bran, beans, apples and pears. And foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts and flax seed can lower LDL levels as well.

Type 2 diabetes seems to be one of those conditions that’s closely related to lifestyle. Along with tips on nutrition, what else do your readers want in helping to manage their diabetes?

I’ve found that people who have type 2 diabetes want simple but straightforward suggestions on what they can do to live a healthy life with diabetes. Making changes to one’s eating plan can be difficult (we form our eating habits early on!), so practical pointers around food shopping, making nutritious meals and controlling portions are always helpful.

In addition, because getting and staying physically active is so important for people with diabetes, guidelines on how to fit activity into one’s daily life (like walking on your lunch break, for example, or using a resistance band while watching TV) are invaluable. Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can be stressful. Finding ways to reduce stress and to take time to relax is important. Finally, information is power. I encourage people who have diabetes to check their blood sugar levels – if not every day, at least a few times per week – to get a better understanding of how their food, activity and medications affect their diabetes control.

What about sleep? Have patients indicated that the condition seems to be associated with insomnia or sleep apnea?

Sleep is a big issue when it comes to diabetes. First, poorly controlled diabetes can keep a person from getting a good night’s sleep, especially if they’re getting up frequently to use the bathroom or get something to drink. Second, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk for sleep apnea, a serious condition whereby a person stops breathing for short periods of time while sleeping. And third, complications from diabetes, such as neuropathy, can also prevent a person from getting restful sleep.

Restless leg syndrome is another condition that interferes with sleep, and this condition is more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. A lack of sleep can increase the risk of heart disease, obesity and even type 2 diabetes. Sleep deprivation can also do a number on your immune system, meaning that you’re more likely to get sick. Sleep experts recommend aiming for about 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night.

So, if you could come up with three top bits of advice for people who live with – or want to avoid – type 2 diabetes, what would they be?

Here’s my advice: First, focus on making small but meaningful changes to your eating plan (if you need to!). You don’t need to cut out carbs or go on some stringent diet. But aim to eat plenty of “whole” foods, including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and lean protein foods. Limit processed and fast food as much as possible.

Second, be active. If going to the gym isn’t for you, no worries. Go walking. Climb stairs. March in place when you watch television or talk on the phone. Physical activity is so important to help with blood sugar control. And third, take care of yourself. This means getting enough (but not too much) sleep, managing stress and making sure you have support from family, friends, co-workers or even an online community.

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