10 posts tagged “ALS TDI”

PatientsLikeMe Co-Founders Jamie and Ben Heywood Win International Alliance of ALS/MND Associations 2016 Humanitarian Award

Posted December 8th, 2016 by

DUBLIN—December 8, 2016—A decade after their work sparked a revolution in patient empowerment and patient-centered medicine, PatientsLikeMe co-founders Jamie and Ben Heywood were awarded the 2016 Humanitarian Award by the International Alliance of ALS/MND Associations.

Inaugurated in 2000, the Humanitarian Award recognizes and encourages contributions to the fight against Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Motor Neurone Disease (ALS/MND) and is awarded to those whose work is of international significance for people affected by ALS/MND.

In presenting the award, the Alliance’s citation acknowledged the founding of both the patient network PatientsLikeMe and the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI), the world’s first non-profit biotechnology company. “When their brother was diagnosed with ALS at the age of 29, James Allen Heywood and Benjamin Heywood were devastated at his prognosis and at the lack of effective treatments for the disease. They saw firsthand how isolating ALS/MND can be. They took up these challenges as a family and, with family and friends, founded two organizations: ALS TDI, tasked with finding effective treatments for the condition, and PatientsLikeMe, to tackle social isolation and to collect data on what other drugs, interventions or supplements might make a difference to those with ALS/MND.”

Jamie Heywood thanked the association on behalf of his family and PatientsLikeMe members and staff and said the company is ready to lead the next decade of advancements in research and medicine, with and for patients. “We changed the rules by helping patients digitize and share their experience so they could make more informed decisions about how to live with and treat their condition. Now we’re embarking on the next stage of the journey by piloting biomarker discovery in ALS and other conditions. We hope many more patients will join us as we work together to find new answers.”

More information about how to be part of PatientsLikeMe’s upcoming research in ALS/MND is available at www.patientslikeme.com/advanceals.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services, and care. With more than 400,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 85 research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact                                                                                                                Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
781.492.1039
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com

 


What can you do to challenge ALS in May?

Posted May 4th, 2015 by

It’s been 23 years since the U.S. Congress first recognized May as ALS Awareness Month in 1992, and while progress towards new treatments has been slower than we’ve all hoped,  a lot has still happened since then. In 1995, Riluzole, the first treatment to alter the course of ALS, was approved by the FDA. In the 2000s, familial ALS was linked to 10 percent of cases, and new genes and mutations continue to be discovered every year.1 In 2006, the first-of-its-kind PatientsLikeMe ALS community, was launched, and now numbers over 7,400 strong. And just two short years later, those community members helped prove that lithium carbonate, a drug thought to affect ALS progression, was actually ineffective.

This May, it’s time to spread awareness for the history of ALS and share everything we’ve learned to encourage new research that can lead to better treatments.

In the United States, 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS each year,2 which means that well over 100,000 have started their ALS journey since 1992. And in 1998, Stephen Heywood, the brother of our co-founders Ben and Jamie, was also diagnosed. They immediately went to work trying to find new ways to slow Stephen’s progression, and after 6 years of trial and error, they built PatientsLikeMe in 2004. If you don’t know their family’s story, watch Jamie’s TED Talk on the big idea his brother inspired.

So how can you get involved in ALS awareness this May? Here’s what some organizations are doing:

If you’ve been diagnosed with ALS and are looking to connect with a welcoming group of others like you, join the PatientsLikeMe community. More than 7,000 members are sharing about their experiences and helping one another navigate their health journeys.

Don’t forget to keep an eye out for more ALS awareness posts on the blog in May.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for ALS Awareness Month.


1 http://www.alsa.org/research/about-als-research/genetics-of-als.html

2 http://www.alsa.org/about-als/facts-you-should-know.html


Speaking up for hope during ALS Awareness Month

Posted April 28th, 2014 by

May is just a few days away, and we wanted to get a jump-start on spreading the word for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month. As many out there might know, PatientsLikeMe was founded on the life experiences of brothers Stephen, Ben and Jamie Heywood. In 1998, Stephen was diagnosed with ALS and his brothers went to work trying to find new ways to slow his progression. But their trial and error approach just wasn’t working, and so they set out to find a better way. And that’s how in 2004, PatientsLikeMe was created. If you don’t know the story, you can watch the feature documentary of the family’s journey, called “So Much So Fast.”

ALS is considered a rare condition, but it’s actually more common than you might think – in the United States, 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS each year, and as many as 30,000 are living with the condition at any given time.1 ALS affects people of every race, gender and background, and there is no current cure.

Even before PatientsLikeMe, Jamie started the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI), an independent research center that focuses on developing effective therapeutics that slow and stop ALS. Now, it’s the largest non-profit biotech solely focused on finding an effective therapy for ALS. And on May 3rd, “The Cure is Coming!” road race and awareness walk will be held in Lexington Center, MA, to help raise funds for ALS TDI. There’ll be a picnic lunch, cash prizes for the road race winners and live music. Last year, over $110,000 was raised for ALS TDI – if you’re in the neighborhood, join the race today.

Also, the ALS Association (ALSA) sponsors several events during May, and this year, you can:

Back in January, we shared a special ALS infographic on the blog – the PatientsLikeMe ALS community was the platform’s first community, and now, it’s more than 6,000 members strong. If you’ve been diagnosed with ALS, there’s a warm and welcoming community on PatientsLikeMe waiting for you to join in. Ask questions, get support and compare symptoms with others who get what you’re going through.

Keep an eye out for more ALS awareness posts on the blog in May, including an interview with one of our ALS members.

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for ALS Awareness Month

 


1http://www.alsa.org/about-als/facts-you-should-know.html


Raising awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Posted May 1st, 2013 by

May is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month. As many out there know, PatientsLikeMe was inspired by the life experiences of Stephen Heywood, who was diagnosed with this serious neurological disease back in 1998. Stephen’s brothers (Ben and Jamie) made many attempts to slow the progression of his condition, but their trial-and-error approach just wasn’t working. They knew there had to be a better way, and in 2004 PatientsLikeMe was created.

Every year, about 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS in the U.S. It can affect any race or ethnicity and there is currently no treatment or cure that will reverse or even stop its progression.[1] By getting involved, you can help change that.

31

The ALS Association has put together a terrific calendar of events called “31 Ways in 31 Days.” For each day in the month they’ve created a simple way to get involved and help raise awareness.

 

TDIYou can also find upcoming awareness events on the ALS Therapy Development Institute calendar. There will be picnics, charity golf tournaments and “The Cure is Coming” 5k and awareness walk. And don’t forget, we’d love to sponsor your run/walk team through our PatientsLikeMeInMotion program. Your whole team will get free t-shirts, a donation and more!

Looking for more info on non-profits during ALS awareness month? There are a bunch of organizations dedicated to the cause. A fellow PatientsLikeMe community member put together a great list in his forum thread Comparison of ALS/MND Organizations.

If you’re living with ALS, find others just like you in our growing community of almost 6,000 ALS patients on PatientsLikeMe. Learn what they’re doing to manage their condition with symptom and treatment reports, and share your own experience with a personal health profile or in the community forums.

 


[1] http://www.alsa.org/about-als/facts-you-should-know.html


What Is Health?

Posted February 20th, 2013 by

It seems like a basic question, but at PatientsLikeMe, we’ve spent a lot of time thinking about what it means.  Check out Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood’s thought-provoking presentation below at the Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue’s “Future of Human Longevity” conference.

Can you really understand concepts such as health, mobility or well-being without measuring or comparing them?  See why Jamie argues that you can’t – and also why one’s “health span” may be more important than one’s “lifespan.”  Click the image below to tune in.

Click on this screenshot to begin the slideshow presentation.

*After clicking the image above, select the “08:45” link to your left to start the presentation.


PatientsLikeMe at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

Posted November 28th, 2012 by

On Friday, November 2nd, several PatientsLikeMe team members donned their finest to attend the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, a charity gala benefiting the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI).  Founded by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood in 1999, ALS TDI is the world’s most advanced research laboratory dedicated to ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The PatientsLikeMe Team Along with ALS Patient Steve Saling (Front) at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

This gala fundraiser was held in conjunction with ALS TDI’s 8th Annual Leadership Summit, which included in-depth scientific presentations by top ALS researchers, a discussion panel with industry leaders and an awards ceremony honoring individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to ALS research and advocacy.  (View the summit webcast here.)  PatientsLikeMe was a proud sponsor of this annual gathering of the most influential minds in the ALS community.  In particular, we were honored to witness the posthumous awarding of the Stephen Heywood Patients Today Award – given annually to an individual who exemplifies what it means to be an educator, role model and advocate – to beloved PatientsLikeMe member Persevering (Rob Tison).

Keeping with the Laboratory Theme, The Name Cards Were Inspired by the Periodic Table of Elements

Held at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston the next night, A White Coat Affair was an opportunity for summit attendees to unwind and socialize via cocktails, a dinner program, live music and dancing.  In honor of the theme, servers wore white lab coats, name cards were labeled like the periodic table and vases were filled with brightly colored liquid to resemble lab tubes.  A special highlight of the dinner program this year was the Young Perspectives on ALS segment, which featured the stories of two young people living with ALS (Corey Reich and Pete Frates) as well as four young people who are the children of ALS patients (Katie Shambo, Sam Ketchum, Jenn Sutherland and Alex Heywood).

As you might have guessed, Alex Heywood is the son of Stephen Heywood and nephew of PatientsLikeMe Co-Founders Jamie Heywood and Ben Heywood.  Both ALS TDI and PatientsLikeMe were inspired by Stephen’s seven-year battle with ALS, a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with an average life expectancy of two to five years following diagnosis.

Young ALS Patients and the Sons and Daughters of ALS Patients Were the Focus of This Year's Dinner Program

Approximately 350 guests attended A White Coat Affair, helping to raise $450,000 towards ALS TDI’s efforts to discover and develop effective treatments for ALS. After a decade of progress, the institute is entering a time of great promise, with several therapies in clinical trials and their own work on Gilenya (a drug currently approved for treating multiple sclerosis) and other potential therapeutics moving into the clinical realm.  Learn more about ALS TDI’s current research projects here.

To see more photos from the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, visit the event’s Facebook page.


Leaving a Legacy of Data at PatientsLikeMe

Posted October 30th, 2012 by

ALS member Persevering in front of the US Capitol, where he was participating in ALS Advocacy Day 2011.Recently, our ALS community mourned the loss of Persevering, a highly proactive three-star member who was known for his unfailing efforts to support fellow patients, record and share data, report website problems and recruit ALS clinical trial participants.  Offline, he was also a tireless advocate for ALS awareness and research, attending conferences and lobbying on Capitol Hill.  Persevering passed away on September 10, 2012, at the age of 42, and is deeply missed by both our members and our staff.

While we are unable to recognize every member who passes away on our blog, we wanted to take this opportunity to highlight how our community responds to loss as well share what happens to a deceased patient’s profile data.  When our community managers are notified of a member’s death – typically by a family member, caregiver or another member who was close to the person – they add the date of death to the member’s profile. This automatically updates their icon nugget with a black band to show that the member has passed away. (See image below.)

Persevering’s icon nugget – with the black band representing that he’s no longer with us after his three-year battle with ALS.

Also, our members often create a forum thread about the member, to which the tag “In Memory” is added by other members or the community manager so that it is searchable and “followable” using this tag. In these emotional threads, members acknowledge the deceased member’s contributions, reflect on the loss to the community and pay their respects.  Essentially, it’s a place for remembering a friend, telling stories, supporting one another, sharing funny memories and sending condolences to the family.

Each month, our community managers update our “In Memoriam” thread in the PatientsLikeMe forum with a list of members who have passed away during the previous month, and they include links to each profile. That way, members who haven’t logged on for a while or may have missed the news of someone’s passing can stay up-to-date.  Members can also choose to “follow” that thread if they wish to be notified whenever there is a new monthly update.

As for the profiles of members who have passed, they effectively create a legacy of data on our site, as their profile pages remain accessible to our members in perpetuity.  As a result, present and future members may continue to access these profiles to compare and learn from similar experiences.  Persevering’s detailed treatment, symptom and disease progression data, for example, will live on as a rich source of information and insight for other ALS patients.  What was his experience in the Phase II Study of NP001?  Read his comprehensive treatment history here.  What side effect led him to stop taking Riluzole?  Find out here.

Persevering’s Functional Rating Scale (FRS) data, showing his ALS progression over time.

So as you can see, Persevering is still helping others today, and we thank him for that.  We also want to recognize his contributions to our recent publication about NP001.  We have dedicated this new work to him as it was inspired by his keen desire as a “citizen scientist” to analyze and understand the impact of NP001 on his ALS progression.

As a result of these myriad achievements, Persevering will be posthumously awarded the Stephen Heywood Patients Today Award at the 8th Annual ALS Therapy Development Institute Leadership Summit on November 1st in Boston. Learn more about this beloved and influential ALS advocate by checking out the Facebook page created in his honor, entitled Persevering – You Are a Game Changer.


Meet ALS “Treat Us Now” Steering Committee Member Tom Murphy

Posted March 9th, 2012 by

ALS Activist and Petition Co-Author Tom Murphy

You may remember our interview with ALS advocate Debra Quinn from last fall.  Today, we’d like to introduce you to another ALS patient activist in our midst:  Tom Murphy, a PatientsLikeMe member since January 2011.  As part of the ALS Treat Us Now nonprofit group, Tom and several other ALS patients around the country have launched a petition on Change.org that’s gaining steam.  Their goal?  20,000 signatures.

Addressed to “corporate citizens, FDA executives and neurologists,” the petition asks that “compassionate use” drugs be made available to ALS patients now.  What this means is that Tom and the Treat Us Now group want promising Phase II drugs showing safety and efficacy to be made available to ALS patients prior to FDA approval.  The reason is simple. ALS patients, who face an average life expectancy of two to five years following diagnosis, don’t have time to wait.

Check out our interview with Tom to learn how he became part of ALS Treat Us Now and what two experimental drugs his group is focused on in particular.

1.  How did you get involved in the “Treat Us Now” movement?

ALS Treat Us Now Is a Nonprofit Organization Dedicated to Accelerating Access to ALS Treatments

The ALS community seems to be a very close-knit group of people who readily share information and collaborate openly.  This is often related to the objectives of spreading ALS awareness, accelerating new treatments for people with ALS, and most importantly, doing whatever we can to assist in the identification and development of a cure for this rare and terminal disease that has been with us for way too long without an effective treatment or hope for a cure.

Since being diagnosed with ALS in December 2010, I (and many others like myself) have developed a very extensive “network” within this community utilizing blogs, email, Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, LinkedIn, PatientsLikeMe, ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI), the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) and the ALS Association (ALSA) and other ALS-related internet sites.

This network included Ms. Sherron Greene from Kaplan, LA (whose brother Kendall was officially diagnosed in October 2010), who was working with the Treat Us Now group and reached out for my assistance with some research and ALS points of contact at various medical facilities involved in ALS clinical trials. I wanted to be part of this Treat Us Now team and the rest is history.

2.  What kind of response have you received to the petition so far?

As of 12:00 p.m. EST today, we’ve gotten 10,520 petition signatures.  I’d ask folks to please take the time to watch the complete video below about my friend Kendall Saltzman, and you will begin to understand much better the urgency of our fight regarding compassionate use drugs for people with ALS.

3.  Tell us about the two drugs – dexpramipexole and NP001 – mentioned in the petition.

Highly related to the Parkinson’s disease drug pramipexole (Mirapex), the neuro-protectant dexpramipexole (Empower) may slow ALS progression by keeping the power on in deteriorating motor nerves. Dexpramipexole is thought to maintain mitochondrial function in people with ALS by detoxifying reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

In the Phase II study, ALS progressed 31% slower in patients taking 300mg of dexpramipexole daily compared to placebo.  It also appeared to be safe and well-tolerated.  The drug, now licensed to Biogen, is currently being tested at the Phase III stage in about 800 patients at 81 sites worldwide.  ALS TDI calls it “extremely promising.”

US and Canadian Locations for the Dexpramipexole Phase III Clinical Trial

In May 2011, I was one of the first 10 ALS patients to be enrolled in the Phase III trial at the University of Virginia.  The FDA fast-tracked dexpramipexole in 2009 due to the need for a more effective treatment for ALS.  Initial Phase III results are expected in 2013.  (Learn more about dexpramipexole here.)

The experimental drug NP001, administered by intravenous injection, is still in the Phase II clinical trial stage.  NP001 may lower the levels of activated cytotoxic macrophages in people with ALS, thus reducing inflammation and further injury to the motor nerves.  The Phase II double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial is ongoing at several US locations.  Unless an early usage allowance is granted, it may require an additional 5-7 years of testing.

Led by top ALS researcher Dr. Robert G. Miller of Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center in San Francisco, this trial is notable as the scientific foundation of NP001 is extremely sound.  Andrew Gengos, CEO of Neuraltus, the manufacturer of NP001, says, “Our hope is that if we can reduce or eliminate the neuroinflammation, it will have a beneficial effect on the underlying progression of ALS.”  (Learn more about NP001 here.)

4.  Beyond signing the petition, what else can people do to become ALS activists?

Take part in the activities and initiatives of the ALS Association (ALSA), the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI, founded by PatientsLikeMe’s Jamie Heywood) and Treat Us Now.

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What does PatientsLikeMe think about compassionate use?  “Our society needs to rethink the balance of risk and reward to allow patients the right to pursue the treatments they believe can help them,” says Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood, whose brother Stephen died from ALS. “This is a complex problem with many balancing issues, but I believe that there needs to be a mechanism for those that consent and who understand the risks to pursue options they chose regardless of regulatory status. Those facing illness should not be denied the right to self-determine their own path to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”


“A White Coat Affair”: A Wonderful Evening Celebrating ALS TDI

Posted November 4th, 2011 by

Last night, the PatientsLikeMe team came together for a great cause: the “White Coat Affair” gala benefit in support of the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI).  Founded by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood in 1999, ALS TDI is the world’s most advanced research laboratory dedicated to ALS.

PatientsLikeMe Executives and Employees at ALS TDI's "A White Coat Affair"

Held the night before the institute’s 7th Annual Leadership Summit, the gala event included the presentation of the first-ever “ALS TDI Lou Gehrig Award” to US Congressman Michael Capuano as well as special recognition for ALS TDI Chairman of the Board Augie Nieto, who has raised more than $30 million for the institute since 2007.

Congratulations to ALS TDI on 12 years of cutting-edge research and leadership.


Photo of the Day: A Glimpse of PatientsLikeMeInMotion

Posted July 15th, 2011 by

As we mentioned in our blog post last week, our PatientsLikeMeInMotion program is off to a running start this year with more than 30 sponsored teams thus far. What does one of these run/walk/bike teams look like? Below is Team Sylvan, a 40-person team led by ALS patient Panda155.

Team Sylvan, Sponsored by PatientsLikeMeInMotion

Decked out in bright blue PatientsLikeMe t-shirts, Team Sylvan took to the streets for the ALSTDI Cure Is Coming Walk, held on May 7, 2011, in Lexington, Massachusetts. This is the third year that they’ve been sponsored by PatientsLikeMeInMotion, which makes them one of our veteran superstar teams.

Congrats to Team Sylvan and all of our sponsored teams for your efforts to raise funds and awareness for your condition. We’re honored to support you every step of the way.  For more inspiring PatientsLikeMeInMotion team photos, check out our new Flickr slideshow.

Organizing a team for this fall?  Sign up for PatientsLikeMeInMotion today.