3 posts tagged “adverse event reporting”

$70,000 at Stake in the “Reporting Safety Events Challenge”

Posted August 22nd, 2012 by

How serious is the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) about increasing patient safety?   So serious that they are running a contest challenging the best and brightest developers to create a platform that makes it easier to report a patient safety event electronically.

Learn More About the "Reporting Safety Events Challenge" for Developers Here

The Reporting Patient Safety Events Challenge is offering $70,000 worth of prizes, with $50,000 (and a demo opportunity) awarded to the first place winner, $15,000 to the second place winner and $5,000 to third place winner.  The submission deadline is August 31, 2012.  Learn more about the contest guidelines and 30+ participating developer teams here.

“Ideally, we would live in a world of optimal care delivery,” says the ONC.  “Physicians, nurses and care delivery organizations across the country are continuously working to minimize and eliminate errors.  But, until this ideal world exists, we need to invest in infrastructure that helps enable better care quality, risk management and shared learning – all to ensure better care for patients.”

PatientsLikeMe fully supports this goal, which is why we introduced our first-of-its-kind adverse event reporting platform in 2009.  As part of a two-year pilot program, our members with multiple sclerosis (MS) were able to submit adverse events related to a medication, medical product or medical device directly to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s MedWatch program through PatientsLikeMe.  Our system automatically pulled relevant data from the patient’s profile into a FDA 3500 form, dramatically reducing completion time.

Since then, we’ve also developed an integrated and comprehensive drug safety reporting platform that monitors patient data for potential adverse events when we are collaborating with a sponsoring partner in designated disease areas. These data are then clinically triaged and curated using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), an industry standard terminology. Adverse events are submitted to our partners electronically in FDA 3500A format to meet regulatory timelines and reporting criteria.  Of note, PatientsLikeMe is the only online health data platform in social media that has successfully passed multiple drug safety audits conducted by our partners’ pharmacovigilance and drug safety experts.

What’s the difference between patient safety and drug safety?  And what do we see ahead in this critical area of healthcare?  Tune in to a podcast with PatientsLikeMe Chairman and Co-Founder Jamie Heywood on this very topic.


Sharing, Openness…and Privacy?

Posted November 18th, 2009 by

Every so often, we sit down to try and make our business objectives clearer to our patient communities.  Why?  Well, we can’t have a business without you and our communities can’t exist to help patients without a business.

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This often results in our Privacy Policy and User Agreement being updated to help clarify our goals and objectives.  One of our company’s core values is transparency, which means we never want to surprise you.  Our site wouldn’t be what it is today if we didn’t honor the trust you put in us.  Because of that trust and our values, we want you to understand what our Privacy Policy means for you and make sure it clearly states what we’re doing with your information as a business.

So, what has changed about our Privacy Policy?  Well, the short answer is not much – but if you haven’t read it in a while, it will read differently (and hopefully much clearer).  As you know, we talk very openly about how we encourage our paying customers to partner with our patients (check out our Read This! section) to better serve your needs. The latest changes to the Privacy Policy reflect what we have always intended to do as a business, which we’ve hopefully expressed to you.  In this latest revision, we try to make it clearer by providing examples of what different parts of the policy means.  We give specific examples of real world cases of where and when your data is used and/or sold.

For example, over the last year we have expanded our efforts into understanding drug safety in the real world.  This started with the Treatment Evaluations – letting you tell us (and our customers) what is good and what is bad about the treatments you are taking.  Next, we piloted (in our MS community) the ability to voluntarily report adverse events directly to the FDA through PatientsLikeMe.  Lastly, in conjunction with UCB, we are expanding our efforts to measure drug safety in the Epilepsy community.  All of these initiatives are building to a better understanding of how treatments work in the real world – one of our goals here at PatientsLikeMe.

As we’ve said through our site from the start – you control your information and you “may enter as much or as little information as they like.” We just added “and should not enter any information they feel uncomfortable sharing.”  This is common sense on any website, but for new members we wanted to make it clearer.   The bottom line – the more you share about your real identity online (whether its on PatientsLikeMe or other Internet sites), the better the chance that someone could identify you.

If you haven’t see our Read This! section, please do.  It’ll help give you a sense of what we believe the risks and benefits are to sharing information.  Openness is at the core of who we are as a company (see our Openness Philosophy).  Your openness is improving patients’ lives, accelerating research and helping improve medical care.   Thank you for that.  If you have any questions or comments, you know where to find us!

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood


An Interview with UCB’s Peter Verdru

Posted July 13th, 2009 by

Last month, PatientsLikeMe announced our partnership with biopharma leader, UCB, to launch a new community for people with epilepsy.  Below is an interview with UCB’s Vice President of Clinical Research, Peter Verdru, MD.  David S. Williams III, head of PatientsLikeMe business development, recently spoke with Peter about the forthcoming epilepsy community, adverse event reporting, and the partnership in general.

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581
(David) UCB is known as The Epilepsy Company.  What’s your goal in partnering with PatientsLikeMe to create a new community for people with epilepsy?
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(Peter) As patient-centric companies, UCB and PatientsLikeMe are both committed to advancing research and improving the lives of people with life-changing conditions.  UCB has a long-term commitment to the epilepsy community – so a partnership with an organization like PatientsLikeMe seemed only natural.

Our goal with this partnership is to provide this community to patients with epilepsy to help them manage their disease. Additionally, the community will generate patient-reported outcomes that may help UCB better understand how patients live with epilepsy and help advance epilepsy care. We anticipate patient-reported outcomes data across treatment groups for seizure severity, number of seizures, symptoms, adverse events, health-related quality of life, and co-morbidities, among other things. Using this knowledge for our future clinical research programs would be a logical next step, leading to an even better understanding of what future treatments could offer or what type of patients would gain additional benefit.

581 (David) This partnership is said to give patients a voice in advancing research.  How so?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) This community will give patients the tools they need to measure their own outcomes. Participants will record their real-time, day-to-day progress in controlling their seizures and achieving their treatment goals, and share that with the community to help other patients, caregivers, researchers and industry learn more about the disease. Tracking their disease over the long-term may help patients and physicians work together to evaluate the impact of their treatment. Eventually, clinical research programs might also benefit from the long-term data these patients are sharing.
581 (David) Through the partnership, both companies will be working to design and deploy a system that allows for adverse event reporting to the FDA.  Why?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) UCB has an ethical and legal responsibility to report adverse events associated with our drugs. If adverse events for any UCB drugs are mentioned on the site, UCB is required to report these directly to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Therefore, we are working to develop and deploy a solution that will allow us to assess and process potential adverse events, report them to the FDA, and capture them in the UCB safety database.
581 (David) What’s the most exciting part of this initiative for UCB?
pvh-1-3 (Peter) We’re excited to be taking a leadership role in the pharmaceutical industry to create a community that will give patients a forum for showing their treatment outcomes. Patients are really the experts about how epilepsy impacts their lives.

UCB is focused on bringing new treatments to patients with severe diseases like epilepsy. We sincerely believe this unique partnership will bring real value to the large community of patients, families and caregivers

581 (David) Thanks Peter!