163 posts in the category “Research”

Want to know more about Radicava (edaravone)? Here’s a snapshot:

Posted August 17th, 2017 by

With the recent FDA approval of Radicava (edaravone), we wanted to know more about how it works and what it means for patients living with ALS. We asked Maria Lowe, Pharm.D., BCPS, and our Health Data Integrity team, to give us a snapshot of the drug, how it’s used and what you should know. Maria’s rundown is meant to give you more context so you can have better conversations with your care team – as always, talk with your physician before starting any type of new treatment.

Radicava: The quick hits

  • Radicava works as a free radical scavenger.
  • When free radical (toxic by-products of cells that are highly unstable and reactive) levels are too high, cells are damaged resulting in oxidative stress (which may damage motor neurons). The way in which Radicava works to help patients with ALS is not fully understood yet; however, researchers believe that by getting rid of these free radicals it can help prevent some cell damage.
  • In clinical trials, treatment with Radicava was found to slow the decline in functional disability as measured by ALSFRS-r scores for some patients. However, it is important to note that Radicava does not stop the death of motor neurons (it’s not a cure).
  • Radicava may be taken in conjunction with riluzole (consult healthcare provider).
  • Radicava is administered intravenously (60 mg IV over 60 min) daily for 14 days, followed by a 14-day drug-free period. Subsequent cycles are administered daily for 10 days over a 14-day period followed by 14-day drug-free periods. Because this drug is meant for long term use, patients will need to have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line) or some other kind of catheter installed.

Clinical trials and FDA approval

  • FDA approval for Radicava was based on a Phase III clinical trial conducted in Japan only in Japanese patients. Patients enrolled had to have ALS for less than two years, have normal respiratory function as well as the ability to complete most activities of daily living.
    • Radicava may be processed and function differently in different patient populations. Post marketing data will be important for determining the effects and impact of the drug in patients other than those who participated in the clinical trials.

Side effects and reactions:

  • The most common side effects reported in clinical trials include bruising, problems walking (gait disturbance), and headache.
  • Hypersensitivity reactions:  Radicava may cause allergic reactions that could happen after the infusion has finished.
    • Symptoms to watch for: Hives, swelling, dizziness, wheezing, shortness of breath, itching, and fainting.
    • If you’ve experience allergies to other medications before, inform your healthcare provider.
  • Sulfite allergic reactions: Since Radicava includes sodium bisulfite as an ingredient, those with sulfite allergies should be cautious when taking this drug.
    • Those with asthma have a higher risk of developing sulfite sensitivity. Let your healthcare provider know if you have asthma.
    • Symptoms to watch for: Hives, trouble breathing/ swallowing, itching, swelling, dizziness, asthma attacks (in people with asthma), wheezing and fainting.
    • If you have a sulfa allergy, you may or may not have a reaction to this drug. Sulfa allergies are a result of hypersensitivity to a chemical structure called sulfonamides, which are common in many antibiotics. Sulfites are chemically different from sulfonamides and any reaction to sulfites is not related to sensitivity to sulfa drugs. Both can cause reactions, but they are not related.
  • If you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant and/or are breastfeeding, let your healthcare provider know. It is not known if Radicava will harm the baby or if it passes into breast milk.

Availability and access

  • Radicava is expected to be available in August of this year as a brand name drug and it’s estimated it will cost around $145,000 per year in out of pocket costs (does not account for insurance coverage).
  • Because the drug isn’t available yet, many insurance companies may not have developed policies regarding coverage. Different insurance programs will develop such policies of coverage of new drugs at different times.
  • MT Pharma America (MTPA), the manufacturing company for Radicava, has developed a program called Searchlight Support to help people with ALS learn more about this treatment and to help them find and secure coverage through their insurance.
    • Searchlight Support offers out of pocket support options only to certain eligible patients with commercial insurance. Patients with Medicaid, Medicare and other government funded insurance may not qualify.

Interested in learning more about whether Radicava is right for you?

Check out the medication guide and contact the Searchlight Support program to learn more about the potential financial support programs and to find an infusion center near you.

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Disclaimer: At PatientsLikeMe, we’re all about transparency, so please keep in mind that this piece is solely to provide a snapshot of Radicava so you can stay informed and make better decisions with your care team. This content isn’t sponsored and we don’t have a financial relationship with the drug manufacturer.


It’s Clinical Trials Day, and patients are driving change

Posted May 19th, 2017 by

Today is Clinical Trials Day – celebrated to bring more attention to public health and also to recognize the contribution of the patients and healthcare professionals who make clinical research possible. At PatientsLikeMe, it’s members who are changing the way clinical trials are designed.

Bringing the patient voice to clinical trials has long been part of the PatientsLikeMe mission. Jeremy Gilbert, Vice President, PLM Health and Paul Wicks, Ph.D., Vice President, Innovation, sat down with us last year to talk about the importance of putting patients at the center of drug discovery and development. Check out their Q&A here. Recently, Paul Wicks touched on the purpose behind the latest PatientsLikeMe study on clinical trial design involving the patient perspective, and why organizations need to work on improving their trial process:

“As researchers we know that clinical trials are the best tool we have for identifying new, safe, effective treatments. Patients know this, too, and they’re motivated to take part. But what this research tells us is that actually participating in a trial is not a fun experience; about as much fun as dealing with the worst airlines, banks, or utility companies, and we all know how that can be. This is a call to action to trial designers and sponsors to step up their game and understand that while patients volunteer out of altruism, a clinical trial still has to fit into their daily life and should create as little burden as possible if we want people to enroll and see it through to the end.”

-Paul Wicks

4,718 PatientsLikeMe members took part in the survey, and below is just a snippet of what they had to say. The complete findings of this study have also recently been published – take a look!

How do patients learn about clinical trials?

59% of those who responded said they learned about a trial from their health team, while 24% said they learned via the web. For those who participated in past trials, the first person to suggest they participate was a doctor (43%) or another healthcare provider (19%), and 80% of respondents said they took part in the trial based on their own desire to.

A key takeaway from the study:

Most people are still finding out about trials through their care teams or providers, but when it comes to making a decision to take part, it’s their own desire that motivates them.

Paul Wicks weighed in saying, “We think patients are interested in participating in research in general because of altruism, that they choose to enroll in a particular trial because of its objectives, and that they stay enrolled because of their relationship with trial staff and the level of burden the study incurs on their daily lives.”

What are patients’ impressions of clinical trials?

Of those who responded, 55% were very or extremely satisfied, and 51% would tell other patients about the trial.

Jeremy Gilbert touched on the issue of patients providing feedback following a trial, “We’re starting to see another gap now, which is that companies have no way of soliciting feedback from patients as they participate in a trial, to find out what patients think of real trials. This is a surprise, because given most of us are consumers, we’re used to being able to give feedback about a product or our experience at any time.”

9% of those who answered the survey considered dropping out of their trial — side effects and worsening of overall health after the trial were the main reasons. Following the conclusion of a trial only 38% of patients recall being told about the results.

To find out more about clinical trials and how to get involved, visit the PatientsLikeMe clinical trial finder tool. Find a trial that’s right for you, search by location, phase, intervention type and more.

Thank you to all who participated and shared their experiences to help bring the patient perspective into improving clinical trials.

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