182 posts in the category “Parkinson’s Disease”

Parkinson’s disease + anxiety/depression: Stigma-busting for Mental Health Month

Posted May 31st, 2018 by

Stress. Anxiety. Depression. Have you experienced any of these along with Parkinson’s disease (PD)? As National Mental Health Month comes to a close, we’re highlighting how common these non-motor symptoms and mental health issues are among people with PD.

Plus, see some new research on the prevalence of feeling demoralized (vs. depressed) with PD, and explore how members of the PatientsLikeMe community try to manage their mental health.

Research shows that the vast majority of people with PD have non-motor symptoms (NMS) — with psychiatric symptoms (like anxiety, depression and psychosis) accounting for 60 percent of NMS in one large-scale study.

“That’s why taking action is important,” says Andrew Ridder, M.D., a movement disorders specialist at Michigan Health. “If you or a loved one has had a new diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, we recommend an immediate evaluation for depression, mood and cognitive problems. Frequent monitoring should also be done throughout the course of the disease.”

Dr. Ridder cites some key stats:

  • About 5 to 40 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease have a clinical diagnosis of anxiety
  • Between 17 to 50 percent of patients with Parkinson’s have depression

“Anxious mood” and “depressed mood” are commonly reported symptoms of PD on PatientsLikeMe. Hundreds of members have reported a diagnosis of PD plus a mental health condition.

Work with your doctor or care team to find treatments that work best for you. Some of the treatments Dr. Ridder mentions for people with PD and depression or anxiety include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as paroxetine or sertraline
  • Serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as venlafaxine
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy or psychotherapy (learn more about types of therapy and finding a therapist)

He also discusses some lesser-known treatments, adjustments to carbidopa-levodopa (Sinemet) regimens (to treat anxiety during “off” times) — as well as some treatments that are not prescribed or advised for people with PD — so check out his full article on PD and mental health (also, check out this video).

Anxiety and Parkinson’s

clinical diagnosis of anxiety is marked by frequent, long-term “feelings of worry, nervousness or unease that may be accompanied by compulsive behavior or panic attacks.” Dr. Ridder says some of these symptoms can be worse or occur only when Sinemet is wearing off, also known as “off times.”

Join PatientsLikeMe to see what members living with PD have shared about their experiences with anxious mood as a symptom (and the treatments they’ve tried) — after joining, click here. Nearly 300 members report having diagnoses of both PD and generalized anxiety disorder.

Depression and PD

“Depression and Parkinson’s have so many similar-looking symptoms that it is hard to tell the difference between them,” Dr. Ridder says. “It’s important to note, however, that depression is not a reaction to the disability. Rather, it seems to be related to the degeneration of specific neurons in Parkinson’s disease itself.”

Both PD and a depression can bring: sadness, pessimism, decreased interest in activities, slowing movements and fatigue. Clinical depression or major depressive disorder is often accompanied with guilt and self-blame, which you don’t often see in Parkinson’s disease depression, Dr. Ridder points out.

Join/log into PatientsLikeMe to explore what other members with PD have shared about their experiences with depressed mood as a symptom (and the treatments they’ve tried for it) here. Also, connect with about 300 members who say they’ve been diagnosedwith both PD and major depressive disorder.

Depression vs. feeling demoralized

New research published in the journal Neurology sheds light on how many people with PD may feel demoralized (and not clinically depressed). Among the 94 study participants with PD, 17 of them (18%) felt demoralized, while 19 of them were depressed.

“Demoralization is a state of feeling helpless and hopeless, with a self-perceived inability to perform tasks in stressful situations,” PsychCentral explains in a report about the new study. “With depression, a person usually knows the appropriate course of action and lacks motivation to act. With demoralization, a person may feel incompetent and therefore uncertain about the appropriate course of action. The two can occur together.”

Study author Brian Koo, M.D., says the distinction is important because “demoralization may be better treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy rather than antidepressant medication, which is often prescribed for depression.”

Get tips to help handle or prevent demoralization in this recent Parkinson’s Foundation blog post.

Let’s not forget stress

Stress refers to “the emotional, psychological, or physical effects as well as the sources of agitation, strain, tension, or pressure.” Stress can manifest itself both physically and mentally, so it’s also important to keep in mind in managing PD.

See how stress affects the PatientsLikeMe community as a symptom, and what members with PD have tried to help manage it. Also, check out the Michael J. Fox Foundation blog posts on 7 Apps for Stress Relief and Wellness and the benefits of low-key calming activities for overall well-being.

Explore the forums

As a logged-in member, click on these links to see what other members living with PD have shared in forum posts about:

And keep in mind that you’re not alone in experiencing these symptoms or conditions.

How have mental health symptoms or conditions affected you along with your PD? Make a comment here or join the community discussions through the links above.

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Cannabidiol (CBD) oil and product FAQs: Fad or effective? Legal or not?

Posted May 29th, 2018 by

Trending: Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, gummies, tinctures and more. Why are cannabis products gaining popularity as medical treatments and in general? As more states have legalized medical marijuana, more people have shifted their views on cannabis treatments (like former Speaker of the House John Boehner’s recent change of heart). And last month, an advisory panel at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) unanimously recommended a medication made from CBD for some forms of epilepsy.

CBD comes from cannabis/marijuana but has some key differences. So, let’s take a closer look at CBD products and some FAQs, like, do they work and are they legal?

What is CBD?

Short answer: Cannabidiol (pronounced canna-bid-EYE-ol) or CBD is a chemical found in cannabis plants that does not produce a “high.”

More info: Cannabis plants can produce more than 100 different types of cannabinoids, a type of chemical that reacts with receptors in the brain. The two most common cannabinoids found in medical marijuana are THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). THC is responsible for producing the mental and physical effects of medical marijuana. CBD has many of the same therapeutic qualities as THC, but without psychoactive effects. (For even more info, read our report called “Weed 101: How and why patients use medical marijuana.”)

Products made purely from CBD (without THC) do not produce the psychoactive high of other medical marijuana or some CBD/THC combination products. But, as a JAMA report and some in the medical cannabis industry have pointed out, many CBD products sold online are not accurately labeled (containing much more or less CBD than the label claims, or even containing some THC when it’s not mentioned on the label).

CBD is not regulated or approved by the FDA — but they have issued warning letters to some CBD producers with misleading labels.

Many doctors (in the U.S. and internationally) are hesitant to recommend smoking cannabis or inhaling any burned plant material but may be more open to CBD products that are not smoked. (Has your doctor or provider weighed in about medical cannabis or CBD products? Make a comment below.)

Are CBD products effective?

On PatientsLikeMe, members have reported trying CBD for about 160 different reasons, including specific conditions (ALS, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and fibromyalgia — to name a few) and symptoms (from anxious or depressed mood to stiffness/spasticity). Below is a list of CBD or cannabis products members have reported as treatments on the site — remember to discuss your treatments with your healthcare provider, and keep in mind that treatment responses vary:

Join PatientsLikeMe to see more details through the links above and to connect with other members about their treatment experiences.

Note: CBD industry insiders advise avoiding splashy websites that offer a “free trial” of the product — by filling out a form, you may be signing up for an unwanted subscription.

Is CBD legal?

Short answer: CBD is legal under some state laws but not under federal law — so it’s pretty confusing (even to healthcare providers).

More info: As of May 2018, there are 17 states with laws specifically about legal CBD. Most state laws allowing some CBD use tend to be very specific (for example, limiting a CBD product’s THC content) and are not the same as state medical marijuana laws.

Under federal law, cannabis products (including CBD) are illegal and classified the same as marijuana (and heroin and ecstasy) as a Schedule I controlled substance. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) made headlines in Indiana (where some CBD is legal) a few months back when DEA spokesman Rusty Payne told the local news that CBD is illegal under federal law, but is not the DEA’s main focus. “We are in the middle of an opioid crisis in this country,” Payne said. “That’s our biggest priority right now. People are not dying from CBD. Some would argue lives are being saved by CBD. Are we going to get in the middle of that? Probably not.”

Last year, U.S. Rep. Morgan Griffith introduced a bill called the “Compassionate Access Act” to encourage the federal government to remove marijuana from “Schedule I” classification, exclude CBD from the definition of marijuana in order to allow better medical access, and regulate CBD products to ensure they’re low in THC. So far, the bill has only bounced around to various congressional subcommittees.

Have any questions, comments or feedback on CBD products? Make a comment below or — even better — become a PatientsLikeMe member to discuss this topic in the forum and see more treatment evaluations from people living with your condition.

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