14 posts in the category “Are you sleeping?”

Talking medication and sleep for National Sleep Awareness Week

Posted April 24th, 2017 by

Do medications disturb sleep?

Did you know this week is National Sleep Awareness Week? Sleep disorders affect around 50-70 million US adults, and troubled sleep is common within the patient community – just take a look at the results from a patient poll we did with you in 2015. There are many reasons someone might be struggling with a sleep disorder, and one of the contributors could be when you take your medication.

Some medications cause drowsiness, while others can keep you awake, so taking your medication at a certain time could impact your sleep schedule. Below are some medications that can affect sleep. Make sure you talk to your doctor before making any changes on your own!

  • Anti-arrhythmics (for heart rhythm problems)
  • Beta blockers (for high blood pressure)
  • Clonidine (for high blood pressure)
  • Corticosteroids (for inflammation or asthma)
  • Diuretics (for high blood pressure)
  • Cough, cold, and flu medications that contain alcohol
  • Headache and pain medications that contain caffeine
  • Nicotine replacement products
  • Sedating antihistamines (for colds and allergies)
  • SSRIs (for depression or anxiety)
  • Sympathomimetic stimulants (for attention deficit disorder)
  • Theophylline (for asthma)
  • Thyroid hormone (for hypothyroidism)

Find out more.

Think your medication might be causing difficulty with your sleep schedule? Bring it up with your doctor, they may be able to work with you on finding a solution. You can also join the conversation on PatientsLikeMe, there are over 31,000 topics in the forum on sleep!

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Study results: What patients like you said about sleep medications

Posted March 28th, 2016 by

Over a year ago, we partnered up with Merck Pharmaceuticals to learn more about insomnia and sleep medications. More than 1,200 PatientsLikeMe members responded to questions about how long they’ve had sleep problems, what treatments they’re using, what interferes with sleep most and what their overall quality of sleep is like.

Here’s what we uncovered (tap each graphic for a larger view).

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Throwback Thursday: Are you sleeping?

Posted July 9th, 2015 by

It’s time for another Throwback Thursday, and today, we’re rewinding back to the summer of 2013, when the staff at PatientsLikeMe shared about how they sleep. Sixty one employees helped kick off the “Are you sleeping?” campaign in a quick poll, answering questions about how long and how well they sleep each night. Check out the highlights below:

How well are you sleeping?
All in all, we found that the majority (89%) of our staffers were sleeping OK or better.

How well are you sleeping?

 

On average, how much sleep do you get every night?
Although our Zzzz’s were OK, 61% of respondents were only getting between 5-7 hours a night (and according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, that’s way less than the recommended 7-8 hours for adults).

How many hours?

 

Do you have a problem…
For those who confessed to having sleep troubles, more people said it’s staying asleep that was the issue (77%).

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What have you tried to help you fall asleep?
When it came to needing sleep aids to catch Zzzz’s, more of our employees turned to solutions like books (60%), lifestyle changes (50%), TV (31%), relaxation (31%) and sex (33%). Some tried over-the-counter interventions (22%), prescriptions (16%) and homeopathic techniques (14%). We also asked what was least helpful, and found ‘watching TV’ topped that list.

Tried to fall asleep

 

Since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, do you…
And last but not least, since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, only a handful had changes in their sleep, with 13 people saying they slept less (23%), and surprisingly, 5 (8%) actually slept more.

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If you’ve been struggling with sleep, read what PatientsLikeMe members Lori (living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) and Marcia (living with multiple sclerosis) had to say about their insomnia. And don’t forget to reach out to the community in the Sleep Issues forum on PatientsLikeMe – over 40,000 members are sharing about everything related to their sleep.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for sleep and insomnia.


What do you know about getting enough sleep?

Posted March 2nd, 2015 by

That’s what the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is asking during Sleep Awareness Week to help everyone better understand why sleep matters. And what you know probably depends on your own experiences. Are you living with insomnia or a chronic condition that impacts your sleep? Or do you just have a restless night every once in a while?

Back in 2013, more than 5,000 PatientsLikeMe members participated in a survey about their sleeping habits, and we shared what the community helped to uncover (get it!?) in a series of infographics on the blog. Nearly a third of respondents never (5%) or rarely (25%) got a good night’s sleep, and almost half (44%) frequently woke up during the night. Poor sleep is the norm for people living with life-changing health conditions, and it affects everything from driving to relationships and sex – view the infographics here.

To help launch Sleep Awareness Week, the NSF released their “Sleep in America” poll results today, including the 2015 Sleep and Pain survey, which looked to find if stress and poor health were related to shorter sleep durations and lower quality sleep. The poll found that:

  • Greater stress was associated with less sleep and worse sleep quality
  • Pain was related to greater sleep debt – the gap between how much people say they need and the amount they’re actually getting1

For everyone living with these sleep issues, you can help raise awareness this week on social media through the #SleepWeek hashtag. And if you’d like to share any PatientsLikeMe infographics or results, please use the #areyousleeping hashtag.

If you’ve been struggling with sleep, read what PatientsLikeMe members Lori (living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) and Marcia (living with multiple sclerosis) had to say about their insomnia. And don’t forget to reach out to the community in the Sleep Issues forum on PatientsLikeMe – over 40,000 members are sharing about everything related to their sleep.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for Sleep Awareness Week.


1 http://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-polls-data/2015-sleep-and-pain


“Sleep has become a process.” Checking in with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patient and PatientsLikeMe member Lori

Posted November 11th, 2013 by

Some of you probably remember seeing her on the PatientsLikeMe blog before. Lori is living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and when we first chatted with her last July, she shared her experiences with blogging, the difficulty in finding the right diagnosis and how connecting with others has positively impacted her life. For our “Are You Sleeping?” initiative, the PatientsLikeMe community is taking a closer look at how sleep impacts our health, but also how our health affects sleep. Check out what Lori has to say about it in our follow-up interview with her.

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Don’t forget to check out Lori’s blog too, called Reality Gasps. She balances stories of her daily struggles with dashes of humor that can make anyone laugh.

How have you been doing since the last time we talked? It looks like you said on your blog that you broke an ankle?!  

I did break my ankle and had to have surgery to put in a plate and 8 screws! I had refilled the bubbler on my concentrator and didn’t realize I hadn’t screwed it back on just right. As a result, I wasn’t getting enough oxygen and when I stood up, my sats dropped quickly.  I collapsed and must have twisted my ankle, dislocating it and breaking the tibia in the process.  Surgery was quite an adventure. Because of my IPF, I can’t go under sedation, so I had a spinal and was awake for the whole thing.  I have three weeks left in the cast, and then I’ll move to a boot. I’m basically chair-bound right now, so I am eager to get mobile again!

We’ve been talking a lot about sleep on PatientsLikeMe lately. What are your sleeping problems like? Have you been officially diagnosed with insomnia?

I don’t have an official diagnosis of insomnia, but it is definitely a side-effect of my medication. I am on prednisone, which can cause insomnia at higher doses. I was just getting over an infection when I broke my ankle, so I was on a higher than usual dose of prednisone.

In addition to periodically having troubling getting to sleep, I also have periods where I wake up several times during the night because my O2 sats drop. Everyone breathes more shallowly when they sleep, and if I am having a flare or an episode, this can be a particular problem for me at night. Since changes in weather can affect my breathing, I’ve been having more trouble during the past few weeks.

When I do wake up at night, I check my sats immediately. If they’re low, I do some deep breathing to bring them up and can usually drift back off to sleep. Though, I have unintentionally started my day at 4:30 or 5:00 in the morning more than a few times!

How do you think lack of sleep impacts life with IPF? Or is it the other way around for you, that IPF affects how well you sleep. Maybe both?

I think sleep and IPF are definitely intertwined for me. To make it easier to breathe, I sleep with my head elevated. I was never a “back” sleeper, so I’ve had to get used to a whole new position. It still doesn’t quite feel “natural” to me, and it becomes one more thing to obsess about on those nights when I just can’t fall asleep. And as I’ve mentioned, medication and O2 levels affect my sleep as well.

When I can’t sleep, I get sluggish, both mentally and physically. Mental fog is especially dangerous because I need to be aware of how my body feels at all times. If I am moving and my oxygen supply cuts out or is reduced, I collapse within seconds. That’s how I broke my ankle. More directly, I notice that I cough more and my chest generally feels tighter if I am fatigued. Plus, when I am tired, it’s hard to get up the energy to keep moving. And one thing I’ve learned is that remaining active is a key factor in fighting IPF.

You mentioned that you take Ambien sometimes, but that it might not work if you’re on other medications too. Can you tell us about that? 

I take a low dose of Ambien, which usually is just enough to let me drift off to sleep. But, when I am on higher doses of prednisone, Ambien often won’t cut it. My doctor gave me a dosage range of 5-10 mg so I could adjust for those situations. But I’ve found that when I take 10 mg, I wake up feeling really groggy and that feeling lasts for several hours. I also worry about taking too much sleeping medication because I don’t want to subdue my nighttime breathing too much. I’ve started using relaxation techniques in addition to the Ambien, and this seems to be helping.

I still long for those days, though, when my bedroom was quiet (no huff-chuffing machines) and I could flip onto my belly and just snuggle down for a lovely snooze! Like everything else with my disease, sleep has become a process.


Stress and sleep- PatientsLikeMe co-founder Jamie Heywood’s interview on the TEDMED blog

Posted November 6th, 2013 by

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Our co-founder Jamie Heywood was just interviewed for the TEDMED blog. Check it out! He talks more about the recent PatientsLikeMe sleep survey and some new results that show how stress can impact our sleeping habits.

 

 

 

Here’s what’s posted up on the TEDMED blog…

A new survey suggests patients’ sleep problems often go untreated

Most people with a health condition have a hard time sleeping well.  And one of the overwhelming reasons why sleep is difficult?  They’re stressed.

So say the results of a recent survey of more than 5,200 patients by the online network PatientsLikeMe. The findings make sense, right?  Yet the issue of sleep deprivation can be hard to spot and quantify among patients already suffering from other ills. Its causes are complex and varied, including factors like anxiety, pain and depression. And our specialty-centric medical system makes it difficult to design a comprehensive treatment.

PatientsLikeMe has been studying sleep issues for more than five years now, amassing patient-specific sleep data representing the experiences of 65,000 patients.  The recent survey revealed that most respondents – 64% – say they think they have a sleep problem, with over half saying they’d suffered for a year or more.

“While a common factor among the chronically ill, sleep problems are not generally on the clinical visit menu, even in questions where sleep is really critical like epilepsy,”  says Jamie Heywood, PatientsLikeMe’s co-founder and chairman and a TEDMED 2009 speaker. “There are a lot of things we think we know in medicine, but they aren’t measured in any way that allows you to do comparisons.”

Looking at multifaceted factors among a large population is one of the biggest challenges in medicine, he adds.

“Medicine stores data in largely a storytelling or narrative format, so when you talk to an endocrinologist, for example, and you ask them if their patients have sleep problems, they say a lot of them do. But they would not be able to say quantitatively how many do, or if there are treatments that are more or less effective for that population.

“We built PatientsLikeMe to advance understanding of the many variables of health across conditions” Heywood says. “Because we run these cross-condition studies, we can create much greater value than the current silo-based model creates.”

 

Stress Contributes to Sleep Problems, Makes Normal Functions Difficult

Stress was reported as one of the biggest sleep loss factors – again, a likely outcome but one with a surprising impact.  Of survey respondents who reported sleep problems of at least mild severity, 89% of women and 84% of men said their sleeping problems are caused by stress or anxiety.  And those with stress-induced sleeping problems reported that it had a significant impact on their ability to work.  (Click here for the data.)

The study aimed to measure sleep quality against the holistic backdrop of a patient’s life environment, such as work and living conditions. Going forward, PatientsLikeMe also plans to look more closely at data relating insomnia to chronic fatigue, depression, pain, and diet, and to delve into nuances such as a patient’s feelings of empowerment and how it may relate to his or her symptoms.

“These are important variables about how people live with disease,” Heywood says.  “Every one of these is a complicated sub-domain where understanding the compounding factors and context is extremely important. For us to move into this next generation of personalized medicine, we first have to understand mathematically what the human condition is.”

PatientsLikeMe also launched the Open Research Exchange this summer, an online platform to help researchers design, test and share new ways to measure diseases and health issues, and to open the research process to patient input, including developing and critiquing questions.

A traditional research model with a principal investigator collecting subjects and restricting access leads to conditions without good outcome measures, particularly those for rare diseases, Heywood says. Instead, Open Research Exchange uses crowd-sourcing concepts to help researchers develop new health outcome measures and more fully understand diseases in a patient-centered way.

“Look at the BECK Depression Inventory – that was developed in just over a week.  The idea that our whole understanding of depression is based on something that was developed in a week without patient input, and hasn’t evolved since, is just wrong. We have patients tell us all the time how to make our scales better, and now we’re going to give them the ability to do it,” Heywood says.

Jamie Heywood will be a participant at this week’s live online Google+ Hangout, discussing the causes and effects of sleep deprivation. It’s tomorrow at 2PM Eastern. Click here for more information and to register.


A Live Online Event: The extended effects of sleep deprivation

Posted November 4th, 2013 by

Recently, PatientsLikeMe co-founder Jamie Heywood and the member community were featured on TEDMED’s blog, and we’re happy to share the post with you this morning. In case you didn’t know, TEDMED is a “multi-disciplinary community of innovators and leaders who share a common determination to create a better future in health and medicine.” (Check out their website here.) Coming up this Thursday, Jamie is going to be part of a live online conversation, talking about chronic illness and it’s impact on sleep. It’s a free event that anyone can join, so we hope to see you there.

Here’s what’s featured on TEDMED’s blog:

The more we know about the physiological effects of sleep deprivation, the less we seem to know about its prevalence, diagnosis and effects on our well being.

The online network PatientsLikeMe recently conducted a survey of more than 5,200 members — people with life-changing health conditions — about sleep, which revealed that most respondents think they have a sleep problem, and have suffered for a year or more.

In fact, a quarter of those said that they rarely get a good night’s sleep. Yet only a small percentage had actually been diagnosed with insomnia. The effects of sleep deprivation, meanwhile, affected their emotional well-being and relationships, and led to dangerous behavior when driving.

Why would sleep loss in what would seem to be an obviously affected population — the chronically ill — go under-diagnosed, and how much do their conditions affect their sleep, and vice versa? What factors are to blame for their sleep loss, and how can we better quantify and treat an issue with such complex causes? Join our live online conversation this Thursday at 2pm ET to discuss the issue and to hear more surprising results from the PatientsLikeMe survey. Our special guest is James Heywood, PatientsLikeMe’s co-founder and director.


Trying to put insomnia to rest – An interview on sleep with insomnia patient and PatientsLikeMe member Marcia

Posted October 23rd, 2013 by

Marcia

As part of our “Are You Sleeping?” initiative, we’re talking with different patients to learn what it’s like to live with a lack of sleep and how that impacts their health. Recently, we caught up with Marcia, a PatientsLikeMe MS community member (some of you might know her as gamma) and happy grandmother of 3 who has had her fair share of experience with insomnia. Marcia talked about her initial diagnosis, her treatment with Zolpidem and general advice regarding insomnia – scroll down to see what Marcia had to say!

 

When did you first start experiencing symptoms of insomnia? Were you ever officially diagnosed?

It has been a while, I think it was early in 2009, so I would have been 49 years old. The problem began with a feeling of bugs crawling all over my skin, and the resulting itch was insane and kept me awake. I did eventually get the itchy bugs under control but the inability to sleep persisted. My primary care provider diagnosed insomnia and prescribed a sleep aid.

I noticed on your health profile that you have been taking Zolpidem since March 2009. How often do you use a prescription drug to treat your insomnia? Has it worked for you?

I did indeed take Zolpidem every night for about 3 1/2 years, and I still was not sleeping as well as I would have liked, but if I skipped a night, I couldn’t get any sleep at all. About a year ago, I noticed that the Zolpidem was no longer working, and I made the decision to wean myself from the drug. I do still have a bottle of Zolpidem sitting on my nightstand, and on those occasional nights that I am desperate and can find no other way to fall asleep I will take one.

How does insomnia impact your MS? On the flip side, how does MS affect how you sleep? 

Hmmm….that is a good question. When I don’t sleep well I find the symptoms of MS much more bothersome. When I am tired I have less patience, and it is more difficult to maintain a positive attitude. The fatigue is amplified and I have less energy to deal with even the small stuff. On the flip side, it is often the symptoms of MS that cause my inability to sleep or stay asleep. Sometimes it is pain, sometimes it is the sensation of bugs crawling on the skin. When this happens, even if I manage to reign in the symptoms, I often spend the remainder of the night awake wishing I was asleep. It becomes a vicious circle; sleep deprivation amplifies symptoms, and symptoms increase the inability to sleep.

How has connecting with others on PatientsLikeMe who live with insomnia positively impacted you?

Connecting with others has many benefits. First, it helps me remember that I am not alone with this challenge. There are others that truly understand because they too are dealing with the same thing. Also, when sharing with others, I can glean ideas from them, including coping strategies that I might not have thought of on my own. And as an added bonus, I get to forge new friendships!

If you could give one tip to people who are living with insomnia, what would it be? 

Find someone to connect with! Either face-to-face or on the web. When there is someone who truly understands and is willing to be there when you need support, it will help keep you grounded and help to keep you from going crazy. It is so easy to lose your perspective when you are so tired that you can’t focus.


Sleep survey results: infographics take-3

Posted September 27th, 2013 by

Happy Friday! Here’s the final round of the PatientsLikeMe sleep survey infographics. On Tuesday, we shared info about general sleep issues, and on Wednesday, we learned how these problems affect the daily lives of people living with chronic conditions. Now, see how the PatientsLikeMe community compares to a study conducted by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF). Don’t forget to share your own experiences through #areyousleeping on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Together, we’re learning about how sleep impacts the conditions we live with everyday, and how our health affects how we sleep.

 

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Survey Methodology
Between July 15 and 30, 2013, PatientsLikeMe invited recently active members to participate in the PatientsLikeMe® survey; 5,256 members worldwide completed the entire survey. The mean age of respondents was 51 years (SD: 13); the age range was 18-87; the margin of error was 0.3 year(s); one survey respondent did not provide age. The survey represents a summary of the current insomnia experience as shared by patients with chronic illness.


Sleep survey results: infographics take-2

Posted September 25th, 2013 by

As promised, here’s the next round of PatientsLikeMe sleep survey infographics. Yesterday we shared some about general sleep problems and how long they last. Today, it’s all about how sleep impacts your sex life, ability to drive a car and overall mood. Don’t forget to share through #areyousleeping on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest so everyone can learn more about how sleep (or lack thereof) impacts our health, and how the conditions we live with every day can affect how we sleep.

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Survey Methodology
Between July 15 and 30, 2013, PatientsLikeMe invited recently active members to participate in the PatientsLikeMe® survey; 5,256 members worldwide completed the entire survey. The mean age of respondents was 51 years (SD: 13); the age range was 18-87; the margin of error was 0.3 year(s); one survey respondent did not provide age. The survey represents a summary of the current insomnia experience as shared by patients with chronic illness.


Sleep survey results: infographics take-1

Posted September 24th, 2013 by

Just yesterday, we announced the results of the PatientsLikeMe sleep survey and found that a bad night’s sleep is the norm for people with health conditions. Over the next week, we’ll be sharing some sleep survey infographics with our blog followers and the PatientsLikeMe community. Here are a few to kick us off…

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PS- Don’t forget to share them on your own Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest pages (#areyousleeping) so everyone can learn more about how sleep (or lack thereof) impacts our health, and how the conditions we live with every day can affect how we sleep.

Survey Methodology
Between July 15 and 30, 2013, PatientsLikeMe invited recently active members to participate in the PatientsLikeMe® survey; 5,256 members worldwide completed the entire survey. The mean age of respondents was 51 years (SD: 13); the age range was 18-87; the margin of error was 0.3 year(s); one survey respondent did not provide age. The survey represents a summary of the current insomnia experience as shared by patients with chronic illness.


Bad night’s sleep is norm for people with health conditions, according to PatientsLikeMe survey

Posted September 23rd, 2013 by

Majority of Members Have Chronic Sleep Problems That Point to Insomnia, But They Aren’t Diagnosed With The Condition

 

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.— September 23, 2013—Results from a new survey of 5,256 PatientsLikeMe members around the world reveal nearly one-third of respondents—people who live day to day with life-changing conditions—never (5%) or rarely (25%) get a good night’s sleep. Nearly half (44%) wake up a lot during the night every night, or almost every night. The survey also found that sleep problems for the group are chronic, with more than half (53%) saying their sleep problems have lasted for more than a year. Here are the survey results and graphics.

“It’s challenging enough to live with a condition that affects your day-to-day life, but now on top of that we’ve uncovered a hidden burden that has a major impact on patients’ well being,” said PatientsLikeMe Research and Development Director Paul Wicks, Ph.D. “It’s vital that patients and doctors understand how lack of sleep may affect other illnesses.”

The survey offers a rare glimpse into the sleep experiences of patients with chronic illnesses and is part of a broader study of sleep issues that PatientsLikeMe has conducted over the last five years. PatientsLikeMe has now amassed one of the largest collections of patient-specific sleep data in the world representing the experiences of 65,000 patients. Half of these patients reported having moderate to severe insomnia, which prompted the survey to deepen understanding of the relationship between sleep and other illnesses. PatientsLikeMe is continuing to analyze the complete dataset and plans other work to study how insomnia relates to specific diseases and conditions. The company expects to publish the complete findings in the future, but the survey results released today show that lack of sleep affects patients far more than the general population.

Sleep Problems vs. Insomnia
The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) says insomnia is characterized by four primary symptoms, including waking up feeling unrefreshed, difficulty falling asleep, waking in the middle of the night, or waking too early. The NSF says a person is at risk of having insomnia if they experience one or more of these symptoms on a regular basis, and if the symptoms impact their daily functioning “a lot” or “extremely.”

Only a small percentage (13%) of the PatientsLikeMe respondents said they have been diagnosed with insomnia. However, among the undiagnosed respondents (n = 4,048), 73% reported they had the symptoms that indicated they are at risk of having insomnia.

Sleep in the U.S.
In a 2005 study of adult sleep habits and styles, the NSF surveyed 1,506 people in the U.S. about their experiences with the four symptoms of insomnia. Based on the NSF definition, results from PatientsLikeMe survey respondents in the U.S. (n=3,284) show that members are almost nine times more likely to be at risk of having insomnia than the general adult population. They also show that PatientsLikeMe members with health conditions experience any one of the four symptoms of insomnia at twice the rate of the general adult population.

Sleep Affects it All: Driving, Relationships and Sex
As part of a series of questions on the impact of sleep on their emotional, physical and social well-being, respondents answered questions about topics such as driving, relationships and sex.

In the survey, people who reported at least a mild sleep problem (n=3,975) were asked how it affects their driving. Of the 81% who drive, 36% have felt drowsy either sometimes, often (10%) or very often (7%) while driving; approximately one out of three (31%) admitted to nodding off or falling asleep at least once while driving because of their sleep problem.

Regarding relationships, 61% of respondents who experience sleep problems said their workmates, family or friends would describe them as “a bit” or “super” irritable; 21% say they’d be perceived as “irritable as usual.”

When the questions got more intimate, two thirds of the respondents with at least mild sleep problems answered how lack of sleep affects their sex life. Of those, one third (32%) said their sex life is negatively affected by their sleep problems, while 27% said it’s the same. Just 17 people, or 0.43%, reported an improvement. The rest answered not applicable, or didn’t want to say.

Survey Methodology
Between July 15 and 30, 2013, PatientsLikeMe invited recently active members to participate in the PatientsLikeMe® survey; 5,256 members worldwide completed the entire survey. The mean age of respondents was 51 years (SD: 13); the age range was 18-87; the margin of error was 0.3 year(s); one survey respondent did not provide age. The survey represents a summary of the current insomnia experience as shared by patients with chronic illness.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 35 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

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For additional PatientsLikeMe news, visit news.patientslikeme.com


Are you sleeping? – Quick poll

Posted July 8th, 2013 by

We all know that sleep impacts our daily lives and overall well-being. Here at PatientsLikeMe, we want to learn more about how sleep affects your health, and how health affects your sleep. It’s all part of our ongoing “Are You Sleeping?” initiative, so take just a second to click the quick poll below and see how you compare to others.

How well are you sleeping?

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Don’t forget to update your symptoms, including insomnia, on your PatientsLikeMe profile. And check out what some of your fellow community members are saying on the “How the PatientsLikeMe Team sleeps” forum thread.

Not a PatientsLikeMe member? Not a problem. Start your own profile for free and tell us… are you sleeping?

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The “Are You Sleeping?” campaign kick off. How the PatientsLikeMe Team sleeps

Posted June 30th, 2013 by

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Sleep and its impact on our lives is one of the hottest topics on PatientsLikeMe. It’s one reason why, over the next several months, PatientsLikeMe is going to be taking a deeper look at your sleep experiences and how they affect your overall health. So, we want to know – Are you sleeping? Keep an eye out for conversations about sleep in the forums, insomnia topics in the newsletter and research surveys that will help uncover more about sleep (or lack thereof). We’ll take a look at everything you’re sharing over the next few months and tell you more about what we’re seeing (stay tuned!) There are many things that can impact our sleep, so let’s get the conversation going and start catching some more Zzzzz’s.

To kick off our “Are You Sleeping?” campaign, we recently went ‘under the covers’ with this PatientsLikeMe staff quick poll. Sixty one of us completed it and below are highlights of what we found about our teams’ own sleep. How do we compare to your experiences?

How well are you sleeping?
All in all, we found that the majority (89%) of our staffers are sleeping OK or better.

How well are you sleeping?

 

On average, how much sleep do you get every night?
Although our Zzzz’s are OK, 61% of us are only getting between 5-7 hours a night. (And according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention that’s way less than the recommended 7-9 hours for adults.)

How many hours?

 

Do you have a problem…
For those who fessed up to having sleep troubles, more people said it’s staying asleep that’s the issue (77%).  (While we didn’t do hard research on this, we can anecdotally share that many people around the office have toddlers and infants at home, so that could be a contributing factor.)

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What have you tried to help you fall asleep?
When it comes to needing sleep aids to catch those Zzzz’s, you’ll see more of our employees turning to solutions like books (60%), lifestyle changes (50%), TV (31%), relaxation (31%) and sex (33%). Some of us try over-the-counter interventions (22%), prescriptions (16%) and homeopathic techniques (14%). (We also asked what’s least helpful and found ‘watching TV’ tops that list.)

Tried to fall asleep

 

Since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, do you…
And last but not least, since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, only a handful have had changes in their sleep with 13 people saying they sleep less (23%) and, surprisingly, 5 (8%)  now sleep more. (Obviously, those 5 people just don’t have enough to do. We’ll fix that.)

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How does your sleep compare to ours? Update your symptoms, including insomnia, on your PatientsLikeMe profile. And here’s a glance at what some of your fellow community members are saying on the “How the PatientsLikeMe Team sleeps” forum thread.

  • “My sleep is practically non existent, if I get a full hour of unbroken sleep I count that as a good sleep.”
  • “I sleep maybe 3-4 hours a night. I get up & read a little & then go back to sleep for about another 3-4 hours. Very rarely do I sleep 5 hours at a time.”
  • “My problem is I am extremely tired all day long.  I do sleep like 5-6 hours in bed sometimes, wake up, and go sit in the recliner.”

Not a PatientsLikeMe member? Not a problem. Start your own profile for free and tell us… are you sleeping?

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