10 results for “steve saling”

Steve Saling’s patient-conceived ALS project

Posted August 15th, 2016 by

Steve Saling (SmoothS), a longtime ALS member of PatientsLikeMe, has made it his mission since diagnosis to help other pALS live a better quality of life. He’s founded the ALS Residence Initiative, which has grown from the first fully-automated, vent-ready ALS Residence in Chelsea, Mass., at the Leonard Florence Center for Living, to multiple residences across the country that offer pALS independent living alongside 24-hour care.

His latest project is producing a series of educational short videos to help caregiving and medical staff in nursing homes and other health institutions better understand the unique care needs of pALS. But before he can create these videos, he’s asking other PatientsLikeMe pALS to help him get started by sharing care experiences in an upcoming survey.

We caught up with Steve recently to chat more about this project. Here’s what he had to say:

You’ve teamed up with us to conduct this survey as part of a larger project you’re working on to create a series of short, educational videos for caregivers of pALS in institutional settings. Can you tell us what inspired you to do this? 

I want to make these videos because it is my nightmare to go to the hospital or live in a traditional nursing home and be treated like a product to be taken care of and kept alive instead of living a life. I have a handful of friends, including Patrick O’Brien and Ron Miller, who have survived institutional living. Their stories were horrible but weren’t about mean or cruel caregivers as much as about ignorant caregivers. I think everyone should be able to live in an ALS Residence but, recognizing that that isn’t going to happen for most pALS in the short term, I want to provide a quick easy way to orient and educate well-meaning staff so that taking care of a pALS, who may not be able to speak or breathe, is less scary. If there is fear of the unknown, let’s remove the unknown.

Caregiver needs are as wide-ranging as the number of people living with a condition, but what do you think is unique about the needs of caregivers of pALS? 

This is very true and these videos will not attempt to be very specific in detailing care needs. But I believe there are some universal truths that will apply to most pALS like non-verbal communication, range of motion, and emotional lability. There should also be a basic understanding of what ALS is and what ALS is not. The Ice Bucket Challenge made everyone aware that ALS is a wretched disease but very little understanding of what ALS is. Institutional caregivers need to know that pALS minds remain sharp and our senses undulled. Like a PatientsLikeMe button of mine says, “ALS has stolen my voice, NOT my mind.”

Similarly, why do you think there’s more research needed here and a need for educational videos?

I think a lot of caregivers are intimidated by the unknown and there is a lot unknown about ALS in the long term care industry. If successful, this video series will begin to fill that gap.

What can you tell us about the series of videos? What is your vision for these? 

I hope the videos become a valuable resource for pALS living in or considering moving to a nursing home or chronic hospital. Even someone going to the hospital for a multi-day stay should benefit. I want them to be what pALS would tell the staff if they could speak themselves. The intent is to create a series of six, 5-6 minute videos that would each cover a different aspect of providing excellent care for pALS. There would be a video for understanding ALS, non-verbal communication, range of motion, emotional lability, patience and compassion, and maybe even one for being a good patient. If successful and well received, this could be the beginning of an ongoing series.

What would you like to take away from this survey? What kind of information to you expect to get? And why is this important for your larger project?

I hope to get a big response so we know that the problem is real. I am counting on friends and family of institutionalized pALS to speak in their behalf if their loved one doesn’t have regular access to the internet. Right now, the topics are based on my fears and a small core of brainstormers. I would like to greatly expand that group to determine what the real challenges are that pALS face. I would even like to solicit video questions that may be in the final video.

After the survey, what are the next steps for this project? And will you be asking the community for any further insight?

I would like to create a focus group out of the willing poll takers. This should be a community project. We will work with a professional filmmaker to storyboard each of the videos along with identifying a recognized expert to address the issue at hand. The filming and editing will take place and there will be a grand release, hopefully with much fanfare and putting PLM in the spotlight for making it happen.

Is there anything you’d like to say to your pALS on PatientsLikeMe? 

Kick ALS’ ass every day. Live long and prosper. Life is good.

 

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“Technology is the cure”: An update with member Steve Saling (SmoothS)

Posted April 5th, 2016 by

Recently, we paid a follow-up visit to ALS member Steve Saling (Smooth S) to see what he’s been up to and talk about future plans.

When we last spoke with him in 2012, Steve was using his expertise as an architect and his interest in technology to spearhead the ALS Residence Initiative (ALSRI), starting with the Steve Saling ALS Residence at the Chelsea Jewish Foundation’s Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Mass.

The ALSRI has grown into a series of fully automated residences – now in multiple cities nationwide – that allow pALS the freedom of independent living alongside 24-hour care. And just this past Sunday, the Dapper McDonald ALS Residence officially opened as the second residence at the Leonard Florence Center for Living.

“Until medicine proves otherwise, technology is the cure,” Steve says.

Watch what else he has to say in this interview.

For more on Steve and footage of the ALS Residence, here’s the rest of his story!

 

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Out of the Office: PatientsLikeMe Visits ALS Pioneer Steve Saling

Posted December 19th, 2012 by

Earlier this month, PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and President Ben Heywood, along with marketing intern Jenna Tobey, went to visit the Steve Saling ALS Residence, which is part of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation’s Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, MA. The foundation has been providing high-quality care for over 90 years and includes the nation’s only specialized ALS residence.

The Steve Saling ALS Residence Is Located Within the Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, MA

When Steve Saling was diagnosed with ALS, a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease, in 2006, he immediately began to “secure a way to provide for care” as his condition advanced. His expertise as an architect, his keen interest in technology and his diagnosis all proved vital as he worked with Barry Berman, CEO of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation, to create the first-ever, fully automated ALS residence. This state-of-the-art residence soon became a reality and opened its doors in August 2010. Despite this tremendous accomplishment, Steve isn’t done yet. He has also created the ALS Residence Initiative in an “effort to duplicate the project nationwide.” The next facility to open will be in New Orleans.

PatientsLikeMe President and Co-Founder Ben Heywood Getting a Tour from Longtime PatientsLikeMe Member and ALS Activist Steve Saling

Steve greeted Ben and Jenna at the door and was excited to get the tour started. Unable to speak on his own, Steve communicates through a sight-based technology that can translate eye movements on a computer screen into audible speech. As he showed Ben and Jenna the residence, Steve demonstrated the independence that advanced technology and the center provide him by opening doors, turning on lights, operating elevators and changing TV channels. The foundation also encourages this independence by getting their residents out and about.  Steve described some of their recent excursions, like going to the movies, downhill skiing at Nashoba and traveling to Disney World.

The Dining Area of the Steve Saling ALS Residence

Steve became a PatientsLikeMe member seven years ago following his diagnosis. Since then, he has been a model community member, regularly updating his symptom reports and frequently chiming in on the ALS forum. In his PatientsLikeMe profile summary, Steve says, “I accept my new challenges and take a great deal of satisfaction in adapting to my losses.” The PatientsLikeMe ALS community is nearing 6,000 members, with patients learning from each other’s shared experiences every day.  Join the conversation anytime; they’d love to hear from you.

To learn more, check out the video below, in which Steve discusses “the dire need for residential living options for the chronically disabled.”

ALS & MS Residences at the Leonard Florence Center for Living from Steve Saling on Vimeo.


“Bang for the buck.” PatientsLikeMe member Steve shares about his experiences with ALS and the IceBucketChallenge

Posted September 19th, 2014 by

Ice + water + video camera = a viral ALS awareness campaign that has spread over social media and the news like wildfire. Millions of dollars has been raised for ALS research while more and more, people are learning about this neurological condition. Recently, PatientsLikeMe member Steve (who has been living with ALS since 2009) took on the challenge, and we caught up with him to find out why. Steve shared about his own diagnosis experience, what he thinks about the ALS community on PatientsLikeMe and what he hopes to see come out of the IceBucketChallenge. Don’t forget to follow Steve on his own blog, too. He calls it Bachblog. 

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your diagnosis with ALS?

I first noticed an odd cramping in my left hand sometime during the summer of 2009 when I was 49 years old. That fall, I realized I no longer had the strength to use fingernail clippers with my left hand. At the time, I was playing pickup basketball two or three days a week. I began to notice that after one hour of basketball I was “wiped out” and that I was having difficulty taking longer shots.

In January 2010 I saw a doctor for a sports hernia related to basketball. At my wife’s insistence, I brought up the cramping in my hand. He took one look at me (I was shirtless) and noted that I had fairly significant atrophy of the left arm. He referred me for an EMG, which I had a few days later.

Within a couple of months I got my neurologist to reluctantly admit that she believed I probably had ALS. She referred me to the University of Minnesota ALS clinic and, about a year later in February of 2011, I was given a definitive diagnosis.

Because I am a U.S. Navy veteran and the VA treats ALS as a “presumed service-related condition,” I am very well taken care of by the government. I am very fortunate in this respect and I wish all PALs had a similar level of support.

I retired in August 2011 as a computer programmer/analyst and UNIX systems administrator. My wife and I (with, at times, other members of my family including two daughters) have traveled quite a bit since my diagnosis: Hawaii, Belize, the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica and a Baltic cruise. I feel fortunate to have enjoyed years of relatively good health. However, I have declined to the point where any significant future travel would be very difficult.

Closer to home, I continue to enjoy family, reading, writing, online and (occasionally, with help) club and tournament Scrabble, trivia competitions, birding, and the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx. In the past two years I have created crossword puzzles that I have shared on my blog. I have been very happy to walk both of my daughters “down the aisle” in the past year and to welcome two great guys to our family.

You called the IceBucketChallenge a “seemingly ridiculous internet meme” in your video. Why did you decide to take on the challenge?

At first I thought that it was a curious way to spread ALS awareness and not much more. Many of the videos I had seen barely mentioned ALS and few included appeals for donations. But that soon changed, and I began to read of the astounding amount of money being raised.

My team had raised around $7000 in two previous ALSA walks, but I was not planning to participate this year for a variety of reasons. I decided that I would use the ALSIceBucketChallenge to make a contribution this year.

There are a bunch of ALS organizations people can donate to. Why did you choose to call out ALS TDI in your video?

I believe that the ALSA, while not perfect, does a lot of good work on behalf of our community. But I know that only about 27 percent of money donated to the organization is dedicated to research. There are justifiable reasons for this figure, but in the spirit of this challenge I wanted to raise money specifically for research. I have been very impressed by the work and commitment of ALS TDI. I believe they offer a lot of “bang for the buck” and that their commitment to openly sharing what they learn is absolutely essential to the overall effort of finding a cure for ALS.

You’ve been part of the PatientsLikeMe community for more than 3 years! How has connecting and sharing with others living with ALS helped you?

I cannot begin to enumerate all that I have learned from the site. The experiences of PALs who have lived with this disease for longer than I have – and, sadly, those who have died – provide such a wealth of experience and advice. Every patient has a different experience with this disease, but there is nothing I have gone through or will go through that someone else has not faced. PatientsLikeMe has been and will continue to be a valuable resource as I struggle to meet each new challenge.

It looks like you update your Functional Rating Scale on PatientsLikeMe a lot. Why do you donate your health data? What does donating your health data mean to you and to research?

I try to update my FRS every time I have an appointment and am evaluated on the scale by healthcare professionals. If I had to do this over, I might have chosen to do it consistently every month.

During my participation in the dexpramipexole drug trial, my FRS scores should have been particularly helpful for researchers and PALS interested in the drug. I continue to contribute my numbers as I do not know how and when an aggregate comparison of participants’ scores may be useful.

We’re all working to find a cure for ALS, but what research advancements do you hope to see in the short term?

I believe, as do such brilliant PALs and advocates as Steve Saling, Steve Gleason and Eric Valor, that until a cure or effective treatments for the disease are found, technology IS the cure. I hope to see continuing refinements of the high-tech solutions to many of the challenges presented by this disease.

Support for research into assistive technologies and for sophisticated but expensive ALS residences is important.

As more and more people learn about ALS through the IceBucketChallenge, what’s something you think they might not understand about the condition that you’d like to share?

I know that PALs who have lost the ability to communicate or who communicate with much difficulty are often assumed to be somehow compromised mentally. They are talked down to or assumed to be deaf as well as mute. In most cases, nothing could be further from the truth. I have not experienced much of this yet, but the assumption or even the appearance of the assumption that we are unable to think, feel, make decisions and speak (even if technologically assisted) for ourselves is profoundly discouraging.

Were you part of the PALS/CALS group that sent the letter urging the ALSA to donate their funds to ALS TDI? If so, can you explain a little about the letter and why the group felt it was so important to send to ASLA?

I did not contribute to the creation of this letter but I did sign it. I think it is important for the ALSA to honor the wishes of the vast majority of contributors to this campaign and spend this money on research.

Having said that, I do not believe that it is necessarily a good idea to spend it all immediately. This windfall will not happen again. It is important that any research efforts funded by this money are sustainable. A research effort that spends a large amount of funds upfront without a realistic prospect of continuing support is a dead end. I would like to see the ALSA commit to long-term support for a few of the best and brightest independent research efforts. To researchers who are open and committed to sharing their efforts. Big pharma need not apply. To give these independent researchers assurance that their support will not dry up next year or the year after that is critically important. Therefore, not all of this money need be spent this year. It does need to be committed to research and invested wisely. This will be a challenge, but it is very important. More than ever before, ALSA needs to be transparent and responsive to its constituents in this matter.


“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Steve writes about his journey with ALS

Posted July 16th, 2014 by

For those of you who don’t know Steve, you should! For years he worked as a successful landscape architect designing urban public spaces. In 2006, he was overlooking the design of the historic Boston Common when he was diagnosed with ALS. Steve retired from that career path and quickly started another – creating the Steve Saling ALS Residence, the world’s first fully automated, vent-ready, skilled service residence specifically designed for people with ALS (co-founder Ben Heywood and marketing team member Jenna Tobey went to visit him at the residence not too long ago).

Steve hasn’t stopped with just one residence – his ALS Residence Initiative (ALSRI) provides an environment where people with ALS and other debilitating conditions can live productive and independent lives. As Steven Hawking said, it demonstrates “the roles of technology empowering the lives of those who would otherwise depend entirely on the care of others. I look forward to living centers such as this becoming a standard for the world.” And Steve is on his way to making that a reality – the ALSRI has opened a new house in New Orleans and is currently building another one in Georgia.

Steve recently shared a story on Facebook about an accident that happened while he was on his way to meet up with friends and generously agreed to share it on the PatientsLikeMe blog, too. He put it all in perspective by talking about the challenges of being unable to communicate with medical staff, and how emergency personnel should be better trained to interact with people who have ALS to avoid potentially life-threatening mistakes. Check out what he had to share below.

A tale of friends, beer and ambulances…

I have always enjoyed drinking beer with friends, and ALS did nothing to change that. All spring and summer, my friends and I get together monthly for beer night. Unfortunately, one time I stood them up.

I had parked the van and was almost to Cambridge Brewing Company. I had to cross Portland Street and had to go down a wicked steep curb ramp, and it flipped my wheelchair on its side. It was really no big deal, but the ensuing ambulance ride could have killed me dead.

I appreciate that it must have been quite a sight as a bunch of people rushed over to help me and my mom. I just wanted them to put me back on my wheels so I could go drink beer, but it seemed like the ambulance got there in seconds. They were super nice, but they are paid to be cautious, and I was away from my computer and my grunting protests could not convince anyone not to take me to the hospital.

That is where things got dangerous. Everyone knew I have ALS, but they strapped me flat on my back on a hard board for the trip to the hospital. They were concerned about my spine, but I am already paralyzed and am more concerned about maintaining an open airway, but I had no way to communicate that. If my breathing had been more compromised, I would have suffocated on the way.

Fortunately, my breathing is without difficulty, even flat on my back. My burden with ALS is drooling. I can drool a gallon a day, and I expected to drown on my own spit on the ride to the hospital. One of the few words I can say is “up,” but everyone thought I was complaining about being uncomfortable and off I went. Miraculously, my body recognized the danger, and I realized I had severe dry mouth so I calmed down and made it to the hospital with my mom bringing my chair and more importantly my computer in the van behind the ambulance. I have to say that they were very nice at Massachusetts General Hospital, and my nurses and doctors were hot as balls. It would be tragic if they had killed me by trying to help me. They wanted to do a CAT scan, but I refused and was out within the hour. The whole experience reinforced my fear of going to the hospital when not able to speak. Hospital ERs and EMTs just don’t know enough about ALS to provide appropriate care. This needs to change.

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Paul Wicks weighs in on a new, patient-conceived project

Posted August 22nd, 2016 by

Partnering with patients is at the very core of what we do, but a new collaboration with longtime ALS member Steve Saling (SmoothS) is giving that a new spin — it was Steve’s idea and he’s been driving the project from day one.

Since his diagnosis in 2006, Steve has made it his mission to help other pALS live a better quality of life. He’s founded the ALS Residence Initiative, which has grown from the first fully-automated, vent-ready ALS Residence in Chelsea, Mass., to multiple residences across the country that offer pALS independent living alongside 24-hour care.

Steve sat down with us last week to share about his latest project: producing a series of educational short videos to help caregiving and medical staff better understand the unique care needs of pALS.

But what does this patient-conceived project mean for research? We caught up with our VP of Innovation, Paul Wicks, PhD., to chat more about this project from a research standpoint. Here’s what he had to say:

Working with members for research is in PatientsLikeMe’s DNA, but this collaboration with longtime ALS member Steve Saling (SmoothS) takes it to another level — the project was conceived and driven by Steve. What do you think about this unique partnership? What makes it different than other projects, and what are your expectations? 

There is certainly a lot of buzz out there about being “patient centered” these days – there is a risk that it’s tokenism rather than truly empowering – which means giving up some degree of control to others. In our case we’ve offered Steve access to powerful survey tools and our highly engaged population so he can develop his research about the experiences of other patients like him to help shape the services he designs. That’s really the core of what we do here, bringing the patient voice to decision makers in healthcare, and the reason this is so powerful is that as an architect, as an advocate, as a leader in the space, we’re helping Steve to make better decisions about the unmet needs of his community. My hope is that by giving people an anonymous survey they can complete at their leisure from home or with the use of assistive technology that we might hear from people with ALS who don’t normally have a voice.

In its early stages, the survey was more geared towards pALS and cALS receiving and giving institutional care. Can you talk about the evolution of the project with Steve to include those not in a care setting like that, too? 

We’ve been following Steve’s pioneering work in developing his ALS Residence Initiative for a long time, in fact I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him for a beer a couple of times and I even mentioned it in a TEDx talk as far back as 2010. As a researcher with 13 years experience in ALS I know that while residential care is the right fit for some people with ALS, others don’t have that option or couldn’t imagine being anywhere other than their homes. We also recognized that people have a mix of caregivers, both informal (e.g. spouses, children) and professional (e.g. home help, nurses) and that many patients have a blend of care from different sources throughout their journey. We also wanted to broaden the survey as much as possible so that we could hear from as many people as possible.

One of the goals is to learn from members to get more background context for a series of educational caregiver videos that Steve is producing and PatientsLikeMe is also sponsoring. What else do we hope to learn? 

When you or a loved one is diagnosed with ALS, you get a lot of educational material about the disease. It’s full of statistics and medical jargon about neurons and genetics, but you don’t get much support about how to live with it, how to cope. That could be something as simple as little tips for coping with weakness to something as complex as how to choose the right wheelchair or how to safely transfer with a hoist. Neurologists and experts and professionals can advise and consult, but in most cases they haven’t been there day after day to assist with the basics of daily life that become so hard with ALS, so I’m hoping that with our help Steve can build a permanent resource that will be a great “how to” guide for practical (and sometimes even awkward or embarrassing) topics that people encounter every day.

Caregiver needs are as wide-ranging as the number of people living with a condition, but what do you think is unique about the needs of caregivers of pALS? 

Fear of the unknown is a big one – although we’re seeing increasing awareness about ALS thanks to the Ice Bucket Challenge and movies likeThe Theory of Everything, most people don’t know what ALS is going to involve for them when their loved one is first diagnosed. Many people will want to tiptoe gently in the shallow end of knowing about it rather than diving in at the deep end – it can be hard enough coping with the issues in front of you without having to worry about problems that may or may not arise further down the line. Unlike something like cancer we also lack treatments in ALS, so it can feel like you’re just waiting for the next symptom rather than actively fighting it with drugs or surgery. Perhaps this is just bias, but ALS also tends to affect some of the strongest and most courageous people I’ve known and it can be hard for them to accept that they need help from others – they’ve often been successful professionals or highly active people and so admitting that they need help to walk or to get dressed doesn’t always come naturally to them.

Is anyone else doing research projects like this one that you know of?  

Over the years I’ve seen a little bit of relatively small-scale qualitative research like this published in the main ALS Journal usually from nurses, physical therapists, or occupational therapists, but I’m pretty confident this is the first conducted by a patient!

 

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“TransFatty Lives”: An interview with ALS filmmaker Patrick O’Brien

Posted May 19th, 2016 by

Meet Patrick O’Brien, a.k.a. “TransFatty,” whom we met through our friend and longtime PatientsLikeMe ALS member Steve Saling (Smooth S) after catching up with him earlier this year.

Patrick is one of Steve’s housemates at the Steve Saling ALS Residence at the Chelsea Jewish Foundation’s Leonard Florence Center for Living and he’s also an award-winning filmmaker.

Back in 2005 when he was diagnosed with ALS, Patrick was making his mark on New York City as a rising filmmaker, DJ, infamous prankster and internet sensation. He called himself “TransFatty,” as a nod to his love of junk food. After his diagnosis, he decided to keep the cameras rolling – on himself. “TransFatty Lives” is the result of a decade of footage that shows his progression with the disease and it’s gone on to win the Audience Choice Awards at both the 2015 Tribeca and Milan Film Festivals.

We visited Patrick last month to chat with him about the film and life in general. Here’s what he had to say.

“TransFatty Lives” is available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, and Xbox.

 

 

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2014 recap – a year of sharing in the PatientsLikeMe community

Posted December 23rd, 2014 by

Another year has come and gone here at PatientsLikeMe, and as we started to look back at who’s shared their experiences, we were quite simply amazed. More than 30 members living with 9 different conditions opened up for a blog interview in 2014. But that’s just the start. Others have shared about their health journeys in short videos and even posted about their favorite food recipes.

A heartfelt thanks to everyone who shared their experiences this year – the PatientsLikeMe community is continuing to change healthcare for good, and together, we can help each other live better as we move into 2015.

Team of Advisors
In September, we announced the first-ever PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors, a group of 14 members that will work with us this year on research-related initiatives. They’ve been giving regular feedback about how PatientsLikeMe research can be even more helpful, including creating a “guide” that highlights new standards for researchers to better engage with patients. We introduced everyone to three so far, and look forward to highlighting the rest of team in 2015.

  • Meet Becky – Becky is a former family nurse practitioner, and she’s a medically retired flight nurse who is living with epilepsy and three years out of treatment for breast cancer.
  • Meet Lisa – Lisa was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in 2008, and just recently stopped working as a full-time executive due to non-motor PD symptoms like loss of function, mental fatigue and daytime insomnolence. Her daughter was just married in June.
  • Meet Dana – Dana is a poet and screenplay writer living in New Jersey and a very active member of the mental health and behavior forum. She’s living with bipolar II, and she’s very passionate about fighting the stigma of mental illness.

The Patient Voice
Five members shared about their health journeys in short video vignettes.

  • Garth – After Garth was diagnosed with cancer, he made a promise to his daughter Emma: he would write 826 napkin notes so she had one each day in her lunch until she graduated high school.
  • Letitia – has been experiencing seizures since she was ten years old, and she turned to others living with epilepsy on PatientsLikeMe.
  • Bryan – Bryan passed away earlier in 2014, but his memory lives on through the data he shared about idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. He was also an inaugural member of the Team of Advisors.
  • Becca – Becca shared her experiences with fibromyalgia and how she appreciates her support on PatientsLikeMe.
  • Ed – Ed spoke about his experiences with Parkinson’s disease and why he thinks it’s all a group effort.

Patient interviews
More than 30 members living with 9 different conditions shared their stories in blog interviews.

Members living with PTSD:

  • David Jurado spoke in a Veteran’s podcast about returning home and life after serving
  • Lucas shared about recurring nightmares, insomnia and quitting alcohol
  • Jess talked about living with TBI and her invisible symptoms
  • Jennifer shared about coping with triggers and leaning on her PatientsLikeMe community

Member living with Bipolar:

  • Eleanor wrote a three-part series about her life with Bipolar II – part 1, part 2, part 3

Members living with MS:

  • Fred takes you on a visual journey through his daily life with MS
  • Anna shared about the benefits of a motorized scooter, and a personal poem
  • Ajcoia, Special1, and CKBeagle shared how they raise awareness through PatientsLikeMeInMotion™
  • Nola and Gary spoke in a Podcast on how a PatientsLikeMe connection led to a new bathroom
  • Tam takes you into a day with the private, invisible pain of MS
  • Debbie shared what it’s like to be a mom and blogger living with MS
  • Shep spoke about keeping his sense of humor through his journey with MS
  • Kim shared about her fundraising efforts through PatientsLikeMeInMotion™
  • Jazz1982 shared how she eliminates the stigma surrounding MS
  • Starla talked about MS awareness and the simple pleasure of riding a motorcycle

Members living with Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis:

Members living with Parkinson’s disease:

  • Dropsies shared about her frustrating Parkinson’s diagnosis experience and how diabetes might impact her future eating habits

Members living with ALS:

  • Steve shared the story behind his film, “My Motor Neuron Disease Made Easier”
  • Steven shared how technology allows him to participate in many events
  • Steve shared about creating the Steve Saling ALS residence and dealing with paramedics
  • Steve told why he participated in the Ice Bucket Challenge
  • Dee revealed her tough decision to insert a feeding tube
  • John shared about his cross-country road trip with his dog, Molly

Members living with lung cancer:

  • Vickie shared about her reaction to getting diagnosed, the anxiety-filled months leading up to surgery and what recovery was like post-operation
  • Phil shared the reaction she had after her blunt diagnosis, her treatment options and her son’s new tattoo

Members living with multiple myeloma:

  • AbeSapien shared about his diagnosis experience with myeloma, the economic effects of his condition and his passion for horseback riding

Caregiver for a son living with AKU:

  • Alycia and Nate shared Alycia’s role and philosophy as caregiver to young Nate, who is living with AKU

Food for Thought
Many members shared their recipes and diet-related advice on the forums in 2014.

  • April – first edition, and what you’re making for dinner
  • May – nutrition questions and the primal blueprint
  • June – getting sleepy after steak and managing diet
  • July – chocolate edition
  • August – losing weight and subbing carbs
  • September – fall weather and autumn recipes
  • Dropsies – shared her special diabetes recipes for Diabetes Awareness Month

Patients as Partners
More than 6,000 members answered questions about their health and gave feedback on the PatientsLikeMe Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. ORE gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their opinion about each question in a researcher’s health measure. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

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PatientsLikeMe at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

Posted November 28th, 2012 by

On Friday, November 2nd, several PatientsLikeMe team members donned their finest to attend the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, a charity gala benefiting the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI).  Founded by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood in 1999, ALS TDI is the world’s most advanced research laboratory dedicated to ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The PatientsLikeMe Team Along with ALS Patient Steve Saling (Front) at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

This gala fundraiser was held in conjunction with ALS TDI’s 8th Annual Leadership Summit, which included in-depth scientific presentations by top ALS researchers, a discussion panel with industry leaders and an awards ceremony honoring individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to ALS research and advocacy.  (View the summit webcast here.)  PatientsLikeMe was a proud sponsor of this annual gathering of the most influential minds in the ALS community.  In particular, we were honored to witness the posthumous awarding of the Stephen Heywood Patients Today Award – given annually to an individual who exemplifies what it means to be an educator, role model and advocate – to beloved PatientsLikeMe member Persevering (Rob Tison).

Keeping with the Laboratory Theme, The Name Cards Were Inspired by the Periodic Table of Elements

Held at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston the next night, A White Coat Affair was an opportunity for summit attendees to unwind and socialize via cocktails, a dinner program, live music and dancing.  In honor of the theme, servers wore white lab coats, name cards were labeled like the periodic table and vases were filled with brightly colored liquid to resemble lab tubes.  A special highlight of the dinner program this year was the Young Perspectives on ALS segment, which featured the stories of two young people living with ALS (Corey Reich and Pete Frates) as well as four young people who are the children of ALS patients (Katie Shambo, Sam Ketchum, Jenn Sutherland and Alex Heywood).

As you might have guessed, Alex Heywood is the son of Stephen Heywood and nephew of PatientsLikeMe Co-Founders Jamie Heywood and Ben Heywood.  Both ALS TDI and PatientsLikeMe were inspired by Stephen’s seven-year battle with ALS, a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with an average life expectancy of two to five years following diagnosis.

Young ALS Patients and the Sons and Daughters of ALS Patients Were the Focus of This Year's Dinner Program

Approximately 350 guests attended A White Coat Affair, helping to raise $450,000 towards ALS TDI’s efforts to discover and develop effective treatments for ALS. After a decade of progress, the institute is entering a time of great promise, with several therapies in clinical trials and their own work on Gilenya (a drug currently approved for treating multiple sclerosis) and other potential therapeutics moving into the clinical realm.  Learn more about ALS TDI’s current research projects here.

To see more photos from the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, visit the event’s Facebook page.


Help Patients Live Well with ALS

Posted September 1st, 2011 by

In February, we told you about veteran ALS member SmoothS and his efforts to bring to life the first and only fully automated, skilled service residence specializing in ALS. The Leonard Florence Center for Living opened in November 2010 in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and now SmoothS is working on bringing his groundbreaking concept to other cities.

Want to help this admirable mission? On Sunday, September 25, 2011, the center is hosting a Walk for Living event to raise funds for the Steve Saling ALS Residence and the Slifka MS Residence next door, both of which are part of the center. 100% of donations will go towards these two residences as well as the effort to build additional residences throughout the country through the ALS Residence Initiative (ALSRI).

If you are in the Boston area, you are invited to sign up for Team Smooth Saling ALS Residence. You can also make an online pledge here. Thanks to a generous matching program with The Herb Chambers Companies, every dollar you give will be matched 100%. In addition, all pledges are tax deductible and will help make a profound difference in the future of how care is delivered for people determined to live with ALS.

To learn more, check out the video below, in which SmoothS discusses “the dire need for residential living options for the chronically disabled.”

Learn Why SmoothS Founded the Steve Saling ALS Residence

“ALS does not have to be fatal, and with your help, I will prove it to the world,” says SmoothS. “Until medicine proves otherwise, technology IS the cure. Thank you for your support!”