203 results for “Patient Voice”

“My expertise is as a person with Parkinson’s”: Member Lisa brings the patient voice to drug development

Posted April 28th, 2017 by

Member Lisa (lcs), a Team of Advisors alum who’s living with Parkinson’s disease, has found her advocacy niche: involving patients in drug development.

Parkinson's Disease patient

Lisa Cone, PatientsLikeMe member living with PD

Diagnosed with PD in 2008, Lisa served as a patient thought leader and co-author of a published journal article called “Increasing Patient Involvement in Drug Development.” She worked on the publication along with Maria Lowe, Pharm.D. – a health data and drug information clinical specialist at PatientsLikeMe – and other pharmacists and Ph.D.s.

“I hold my co-authors in the highest regard,” Lisa says. “That said, not one of them was a person with an incurable, progressive neurodegenerative disease. My expertise is as a person with Parkinson’s.”

 

Maria says that having a patient co-author was “crucial” to the publication. “We wanted to look at how drug developers were incorporating patients into drug development activities and recommend some best practices,” Maria says. “How could we possibly do this without ensuring we were representing what matters to patients?”

The value of partnering with patients

In addition to teaming up on the research paper, Lisa and Maria also both participated in a webcast on April 12 on PDUFA VI and the Patient Voice.

PDUFA stands for the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, which the U.S. first enacted in 1992 to allow the FDA to collect fees from pharmaceutical companies to help fund the FDA’s drug review and safety monitoring processes. PDUFA VI, the pending update to the legislation (up for renewal in September 2017), would require drug developers to include more of the patient perspective in the early stages and overall process of drug development. (Read more about it here.)

Maria Lowe

Maria Lowe, Pharm.D., health data and drug information clinical specialist at PatientsLikeMe

Lisa says that the FDA has been trying to drive a higher level of patient participation in the trial process and the drug approval process. New leadership and budget changes in Washington could shift or delay the FDA’s focus on patient-centeredness, but Lisa still has a message for pharmaceutical industry leaders:

“I urge you not to confuse the value of partnering with patients with the requirement to partner with patients.”

 

But she adds that low participation in trials often stems from problems in the study design from the get-go. Involving patients early and often in trial design and drug development can pay off big time, Lisa says. “The time and resources it takes to bring a single new therapy to market are significant,” she says. “Because of this investment, failure to assess the needs of patients early in the development process can mean marginal success or frankly disastrous results when taken to market.”

On becoming a patient thought leader, plus a few pointers

Lisa had professional experience in the healthcare field — before leaving the workforce, she was an executive responsible for understanding the business of and policies affecting healthcare providers.

“I do not, however, believe that these experiences are required to be an effective advocate. I believe having knowledge of your condition beyond your personal experience is the primary requirement, which is not complicated,” she says.

On PatientsLikeMe, 23,512 patients say they’re interested in advocacy. Lisa’s advice? Find a “role that most suits your gifts,” such as fundraising, lobbying or speaking. She also puts her her physical and emotional health first. “This means taking time to relax, play with my dog, visit with friends and family and getting physical activity,” she says. “I’m not always successful in this endeavor as I have a tendency to ‘over volunteer.’”

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Loud and clear: The patient voice on the ACA

Posted March 2nd, 2017 by

Have you had chance to check out that poll where 2,000+ PatientsLikeMe members shared their views on the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”)? It was the largest patient poll on potential changes to the health care law, and several media outlets are now listening up.

A recent CNBC article called “The human side of the Obamacare debate” featured quotes from those who took part in the poll. Here’s a glimpse of the patient perspective:

“Raising the age of dependent coverage to age 26 was a lifesaver for our daughter. ACA is not perfect as there are stories of those who’ve hated it and it cost them more money in the long run, but there are just as many positive stories of all the people the ACA helped. Health care in this country is big business and complicated. The ACA didn’t uncomplicate it, but it helped many more Americans have affordable health insurance. It is a mistake to just repeal it without anything to take its place.”

  • Jeanne of Jackson, WI, living with fibromyalgia, depression, generalized anxiety disorder and primary biliary cirrhosis

 

ACA patient poll by PatientsLikeMe

2,197 PatientsLikeMe members weighed in on the ACA.

 

“I lost my health insurance because my husband was laid off. Then, I had Medicaid for five months, but that was taken away because my husband made ‘too much’ on unemployment which wasn’t much. This doesn’t take into account our other bills like keeping a roof over our heads. I am in the middle of a disability case. I can’t afford insurance. If I start having seizures again from my [traumatic brain injury] or other issues, I am screwed financially. I don’t have any savings; I can’t work. I am borrowing money from credit cards just to make ends meet.

And to insist that I have insurance (the lowest quote I received was $270 per month) with no financial way of paying and getting fined because of that is an insult. I have been paying into a system that is supposed to help when I need it, but no. This has hurt me and so many others.”

  • Shawn, Lakewood, CO, living with severe traumatic brain injury

Thanks again to all who participated and helped elevate the patient point of view. Let’s keep the dialogue going, together.

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Bringing the patient voice to clinical trials

Posted October 3rd, 2016 by

PatientsLikeMe has a long tradition of bringing the patient voice into drug discovery and development, but it’s only been in the last year or two that industry has been tuning in to hear what that voice is saying about clinical trials. For the last 18 months, we’ve been asking many of our members about their attitudes toward and experiences with clinical trials, and working to ensure pharmaceutical companies understand what patients want most from trials, now and in the future. We talked with Jeremy Gilbert, Vice President of PLM Health, and Paul Wicks, Vice President of Innovation, about what we’ve found, and how that’s already helped to change the design and execution of trials and their future direction. Jeremy will be presenting more about this topic and details of a key project with AstraZeneca and Takeda that leverages the patient voice in new ways at the Patient-Centered Clinical Trials Conference in Philadelphia on October 11. More info about discounted tickets below.

 

Jeremy Gilbert, Vice President, PLM Health

You’ve surveyed more than 1,400 people about their experiences and opinions with clinical trials. What have they shared, and what has PatientsLikeMe done with that information?

Jeremy: A lot of people in our community are living with life-altering, degenerative conditions, and they’re acutely aware of the importance of new drugs coming to market to address their problems. In conditions like MS, where there are perhaps a dozen treatments on the market, people are keenly aware that the drug they’re taking may stop working, so there is great interest in helping new drugs come to market. Our members are vocal, too, about how involved they want to be. About 92 percent of our survey participants said they would be willing to help researchers design clinical trials to make them better for patients. At the same time, our industry partners are looking for ways to improve trial participation, especially since trials will grow more complex. So we’ve found these two groups want to come together to improve the trial experience for everyone. And there’s no better place to start than by involving patients in the trial design process.

Paul: The state of art in designing trials has been to use the advice of physician experts and to review literature and published papers, but patients have been left out. Researchers have told us this is because of legal and regulatory concerns about asking patients about experimental treatments; they don’t want to be seen as promoting a treatment that hasn’t yet undergone testing. They also cite their lack of experience and fears about the extra time it might take them as reasons why they’ve carried on with the status quo. We’ve long believed that online communities like PatientsLikeMe provide a great vehicle to attack those barriers. We can act as an honest broker of information between researchers and patients who want to help, we’ve developed a repeatable methodology to gain patient input, and we’re delivering results in a matter of weeks to researchers to improve their protocols. Increasingly now researchers are coming to us before they design their trial to incorporate the patient voice, which is a great step.

Does what patients want from trials depend on the condition they have?

Paul Wicks, PhD., Vice President, Innovation

Paul: Some elements, such as their desire to altruistically help other patients like them, stay remarkably consistent. But depending on their demographics and the impact of disease, we do see a lot of variation. Working age adults might want extended hours so they can participate outside of normal business hours, whereas older people might prioritize having transport organized for them. It really depends on the aim of the study as much as the condition; some trials are for drugs that slow the progression of a disease, while others are to treat specific symptoms or even to take an existing drug and make it more convenient to take, such as moving from an injection to a pill. Against that you’ve also got the overall commitment required to the trial protocol such as the number of study visits, their duration, any special testing that people have to undergo and, of course, any special measures put in place to mitigate those burdens. We think patients are interested in participating in research in general because of altruism, that they choose to enroll in a particular trial because of its objectives, and that they stay enrolled because of their relationship with trial staff and the level of burden the study incurs on their daily lives.

The design of a trial is just the start. What happens as trials begin, or end?

Jeremy: We’re starting to see another gap now, which is that companies have no way of soliciting feedback from patients as they participate in a trial, to find out what patients think of real trials. This is a surprise, because given most of us are consumers, we’re used to being able to give feedback about a product or our experience at any time. That inspires us to think about how to gather patient input not just about a trial’s design, but also during the trial itself, and even after it ends. And if we can figure out how to share the knowledge that’s gathered, that would help industry design and run even better trials in the future.

Where do you think trials are headed in the future, and how is the idea of patients as partners instrumental in guiding that direction?

Paul: Today, taking part in a clinical trial is like having a part-time job. In the future, we want it to be much more convenient and to harness the digital technologies that have become a normal part of daily life. We’re also looking at novel technologies to see if we can do away with some of the aspects of trials that patients dislike, such as placebo arms. Using online digital platforms, it might be possible to produce enough carefully-matched historical controls to more rapidly identify when a treatment is having an effect. That could reduce costs, speed up trials and ultimately increase the number of “shots on goal” that researchers can take to fight disease.

 
Note: Jeremy will be presenting more about this topic at the Patient-Centered Clinical Trials Conference in Philadelphia on Tuesday, October 11 at 2:00 PM. He’ll be joined by Arnold Degboe, Director of Patient Reported Outcomes, Health Economics and Outcomes Research at AstraZeneca. They will talk for the first time about their work to change clinical trials with patient feedback. Discounted tickets for patients and industry participants are available from the conference organizer. Please contact Katie Gadsby for further information at kgadsby@eyeforpharma.com.

 

 

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The Patient Voice- PTS member David shares his story

Posted June 27th, 2015 by

Today is PTS Awareness Day, so we wanted you to meet PatientsLikeMe community member Cpl. David Jurado, who lives with post-traumatic stress (PTS). David developed PTS while serving in the military. After he retired, he continued to deal with daily symptoms, and he encourages members to connect with others on PatientsLikeMe, because “if you want to make changes for yourself and the PTS community, you’ve got to share your story. The same thing may be happening to them.”

David is not alone – and neither are you. There are more than 1,000 vets living with PTS that are part of the community. We’ve heard members like David talk about how important it is for them to connect with people who ‘get it.’

Not a veteran living with PTS? You’re not alone either. With more than 8,000 PTS members, it’s easy for anyone with PTS to share their story and get support.

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Update and results – the Patient Voice Analysis study

Posted April 27th, 2015 by

About a year ago, the PatientsLikeMe Parkinson’s disease (PD) community started something totally different: a study to compare the sound of their voices to their self-reported PD Rating Scale (PDRS) on PatientsLikeMe. It’s called the Patient Voice Analysis (PVA), and we teamed up with you, Max Little, Ph.D. and Sage Bionetworks to get it done.

A little bit of background
Dr. Little had done some earlier work and compared the voice signals of people who were living with PD to those of people who were not, but we wanted to take that to the next level. With their PDRS, they shared how Parkinson’s was affecting them, and we were able to match their self-reported scores to the sound of their voice.

By matching a PDRS to voice samples, we might develop the ability to predict PDRS scores (which takes a few minutes to complete) by using the voice test (which only takes a few seconds). We might also be able to detect more subtle changes in people’s Parkinson’s through their voice than we can through the PDRS. This is what Dr. Little is working toward, and all the voice samples you donated will help make it happen.

Community results, starting with the basics
Who took part, from where, and how many PDRS scores could we match to voice recordings?

  • Most of the recordings came from the U.S. (81%), with others coming from the U.K. (12%), Canada (5%) and some from Australia and New Zealand, too.
  • 677 of you recorded 851 voice samples
    • Since our original goal was 500 samples, you blew that out of the water!
  • 114 of you took the test two or more times, and one community member even contributed 10 recordings!
    • For those that took part more than once, we can start to examine how your symptoms changed over time.

Why voice recording quality matters
For the PVA study, you were able to use your landlines, cell phones, even Skype or Voice-Over-Internet-Protocol (VoIP) to submit your voice samples. The recording quality varies depending on which type of call you used, occasionally creating technical issues in analyzing the voice samples.

For example, if you’re using a cell phone in a busy restaurant, your microphone will automatically get louder so that the person you’re talking to can hear your voice better and without distortion. But that also changes the loudness of the background noise. In this study, that automatic change could actually affect the quality of the voice recording, so we have to identify where this has been an issue and find ways to overcome it.

Partly because of this, we’re still analyzing the voice samples in detail. We’re looking for subtle markers of Parkinson’s, such as fluctuations in volume, pitch and breathiness. We’re also training intelligent algorithms to identify when the quality of the voice recording is strong enough so we can develop a consistent and repeatable process.

You be the researcher
To give you some idea of what we are looking for in these voice recordings, we wanted to share a couple with you. The first is someone living with severe Parkinson’s, who scores 55 on the PDRS. You can probably hear the noticeable tremor in pitch, and the occasional short breaks in voicing.

The second is a recording of someone with mild Parkinson’s, who has a very low PDRS score of 1.

Can you hear the subtle drift in pitch? This is, most likely, indistinguishable from normal pitch drift. Subtle pitch variations such as this are one of the kinds of symptoms that algorithms attempt to identify from these voice recordings, and they contribute towards making the PDRS prediction.

So, what’s next?
At this stage, the PVA project is still just a research tool and isn’t quite ready for clinical or diagnostic use. We’re still working on analyzing the data to compare the severity of voice patterns to the reported severity of Parkinson’s disease. But in the meantime, if you’re looking to share more info with your doctor, the most useful tool is your PDRS score on your PatientsLikeMe profile. It contains items that make sense to a neurologist. If your clinic has access to speech and language pathologists, they would also have the ability to map any vocal issues you may be experiencing as part of your Parkinson’s.

As we continue to evolve the tools, we hope to provide individual level feedback and information for clinicians. But before that can happen, we want to make sure that the data quality is high enough to support drawing clinical conclusions.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for Parkinson’s.


Update and results – the Patient Voice Analysis study

Posted March 6th, 2015 by

About a year ago, we started working with you and your Parkinson’s disease (PD) community on something totally different: a study to compare the sound of your voice to your self-reported PD Rating Scale (PDRS) on PatientsLikeMe. It’s called the Patient Voice Analysis (PVA), and we teamed up with you, Max Little, Ph.D. and Sage Bionetworks to get it done.

A little bit of background
Dr. Little had done some earlier work and compared the voice signals of people who were living with PD to those of people who were not, but we wanted to take that to the next level. With your PDRS, you shared how Parkinson’s was affecting you, and we were able to match your self-reported scores to the sound of your voice.

By matching a PDRS to voice samples, we might develop the ability to predict PDRS scores (which takes a few minutes to complete) by using the voice test (which only takes a few seconds). We might also be able to detect more subtle changes in people’s Parkinson’s through their voice than we can through the PDRS. This is what Dr. Little is working toward, and all the voice samples you donated will help make it happen.

Community results, starting with the basics
Who took part, from where, and how many PDRS scores could we match to voice recordings?

  • Most of the recordings came from the U.S. (81%), with others coming from the U.K. (12%), Canada (5%) and some from Australia and New Zealand, too.
  • 677 of you recorded 851 voice samples
    • Since our original goal was 500 samples, you blew that out of the water!
  • 114 of you took the test two or more times, and one community member even contributed 10 recordings!
    • For those that took part more than once, we can start to examine how your symptoms changed over time.

Why voice recording quality matters
For the PVA study, you were able to use your landlines, cell phones, even Skype or Voice-Over-Internet-Protocol (VoIP) to submit your voice samples. The recording quality varies depending on which type of call you used, occasionally creating technical issues in analyzing the voice samples.

For example, if you’re using a cell phone in a busy restaurant, your microphone will automatically get louder so that the person you’re talking to can hear your voice better and without distortion. But that also changes the loudness of the background noise. In this study, that automatic change could actually affect the quality of the voice recording, so we have to identify where this has been an issue and find ways to overcome it.

Partly because of this, we’re still analyzing the voice samples in detail. We’re looking for subtle markers of Parkinson’s, such as fluctuations in volume, pitch and breathiness. We’re also training intelligent algorithms to identify when the quality of the voice recording is strong enough so we can develop a consistent and repeatable process.

You be the researcher
To give you some idea of what we are looking for in these voice recordings, we wanted to share a couple with you. The first is someone living with severe Parkinson’s, who scores 55 on the PDRS. You can probably hear the noticeable tremor in pitch, and the occasional short breaks in voicing.

The second is a recording of someone with mild Parkinson’s, who has a very low PDRS score of 1.

Can you hear the subtle drift in pitch? This is, most likely, indistinguishable from normal pitch drift. Subtle pitch variations such as this are one of the kinds of symptoms that algorithms attempt to identify from these voice recordings, and they contribute towards making the PDRS prediction.

So, what’s next?
At this stage, the PVA project is still just a research tool and isn’t quite ready for clinical or diagnostic use. We’re still working on analyzing the data to compare the severity of voice patterns to the reported severity of Parkinson’s disease. But in the meantime, if you’re looking to share more info with your doctor, the most useful tool is your PDRS score on your PatientsLikeMe profile. It contains items that make sense to a neurologist. If your clinic has access to speech and language pathologists, they would also have the ability to map any vocal issues you may be experiencing as part of your Parkinson’s.

As we continue to evolve the tools, we hope to provide individual level feedback and information for clinicians. But before that can happen, we want to make sure that the data quality is high enough to support drawing clinical conclusions.

 


The Patient Voice- MS member Jackie shares her story

Posted January 12th, 2015 by

 

When Jackie was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis after a long, exhausting process, she struggled with a fear of the unknown and had no idea what she would be facing. But then she connected with the thousands of MS members on PatientsLikeMe. Jackie shared with the community about how she felt her current medication was making matters worse instead of better, and others responded with how they had the same experience. They told her about a new medication that seemed to be working for some of them. Jackie’s doctor prescribed it after she mentioned what others had shared, and she’s been having good luck with it ever since. Watch the video to see more of her journey.

 

 

Share this post on Twitter and help spread #dataforgood. And don’t forget to check out previous #dataforgood member videos.


The Patient Voice: Garth shares his cancer story for 24 Days of Giving

Posted December 12th, 2014 by

After Garth was diagnosed with cancer, he made a promise to his daughter Emma: he would write 826 napkin notes so she had one each day in her lunch until she graduated high school.

“In the beginning they never had a deep meaning. They were generally just notes of reminders. ‘I love you’ or ‘Have a good day.’ The notes took on a little different of a meaning after I was diagnosed with cancer. I recognized that I was looking at my legacy.”

Garth’s napkins are his personal legacy, but he also has a medical legacy – the health data he donates on PatientsLikeMe. This month, join Garth in 24 Days of Giving, a campaign centered around patients, driving medicine forward and making good things happen, together. Every piece of health data that is shared will contribute towards a $20,000 donation to Make-A-Wish® Massachusetts and Rhode Island to help fund life-affirming wishes for seriously ill children.

If you’re already a member, add your data to 24 Days of Giving. If not, join PatientsLikeMe and see how your data can make a difference.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread #dataforgood. And don’t forget to check out previous #dataforgood member videos.


The Patient Voice- Epilepsy member Letitia shares her story

Posted September 25th, 2014 by

 

 

What would you do if you were living with seizures from epilepsy since you were ten years old? And you weren’t even able to drive a car? Letitia turned others living with epilepsy on PatientsLikeMe and shared about her journey in a recent video. Watch above to see her inspiring story, and how she’s helping others through her own experiences and the data she’s donating on PatientsLikeMe.

 

 

Share this post on twitter and help spread #dataforgood. And don’t forget to check out previous #dataforgood member videos.


The Patient Voice- PF member Bryan shares his story

Posted July 10th, 2014 by

 

Since we announced #dataforgood back in March, many PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about why they donate their own health experiences. Becca (fibromyalgia) and Ed (Parkinson’s) already shared their stories, and now we’re hearing from Bryan, an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) member. Check out his video above. Miss Becca or Ed’s? Watch them here.

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The Patient Voice- Fibromyalgia member Becca shares her story

Posted May 28th, 2014 by

 

What does sharing about health experiences and donating #dataforgood mean to her?
“I’m hoping that my contribution is going to help others who come behind me who have these conditions have an easier time of it.” -Becca

If you missed our video interview with Ed, a Parkinson’s disease member, you can catch that here.


The Patient Voice- Parkinson’s member Ed shares his story

Posted April 21st, 2014 by

 

Back in March, we shared some of our infographics and videos on the blog, and as part of our #dataforgood initiative, PatientsLikeMe member Ed spoke about his experiences with Parkinson’s disease and why he thinks it’s all a group effort. Click above to watch his video, and keep an eye out for more interviews with PatientsLikeMe members talking about what #dataforgood means to them.


Improving drug safety through the patient voice

Posted November 22nd, 2013 by

At PatientsLikeMe we’re interested in bringing the voice of our patients to the attention of those who make drug products and to the regulators that approve them. Since 2008 we have conducted a series of projects to collect safety information from some of our member communities. We’ve worked with our pharmaceutical partners to help them better understand the safety experiences of patients while they are using certain drug products.

I’d like to introduce you to a new acronym – P.R.O.S.P.E.R.  It stands for Patient-Reported Outcomes in Safety Event Reporting and it promotes the value of including patient experiences in monitoring the safety of drug products during clinical trials and after drugs are approved.

The PROSPER Consortium is co-led and supported by PatientsLikeMe and Pope Woodhead, a UK healthcare firm, with input from most global pharmaceutical companies, many clinical and academic groups, as well as regulators, researchers and patient advocates.

A report from the Consortium was recently published in the journal Drug Safety that provides guidance for using patient reported outcomes (PROs) for safety monitoring processes. These are just a few of the reports findings…

  • The patient perspective is an essential component of drug safety
  • Patient-centeredness and patient safety are emerging as core elements of any responsive health system
  • The potential clinical utility and value of real-world information obtained from real patients taking real drugs is great1

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted safety reports from consumers for 20 years through its MedWatch program, other parts of the world only accept reports on adverse reactions to drugs from health professionals. While patient reporting has recently been encouraged there remain skeptics who doubt its value.

PatientsLikeMe is part of the PROSPER Consortium because we believe the patient voice – your voice – is essential to improving the safety of drugs and medical products. As we look ahead to 2014, we’ll be exploring opportunities to amplify your voice across all areas of health care to improve safety, starting with the FDA and the EU counterpart, the European Medicines Agency.

PatientsLikeMe member MollyCotter


1 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40264-013-0113-z/fulltext.html