15 results for “"food for thought"”

Food for thought: What GERD means for digging in on Thanksgiving

Posted November 21st, 2016 by

It’s GERD Awareness Week — and it’s also Thanksgiving week. To a lot of folks, this means a holiday feast with all the trimmings: turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, pies and other rich foods. But for people living with gastroesophageal reflux disease — over 4,650 here at PatientsLikeMe — it might mean something different.

The most common symptom of GERD is heartburn, but others include difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, sensation of food sticking in the esophagus, chronic sore throat, wheezing or chronic cough.* And while food doesn’t cause GERD, it can aggravate these symptoms.

So what does this mean for eating on Thanksgiving? Here are a few tips from the International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD):

  1. Eat dinner earlier
  2. Season lightly
  3. Pass on deep frying your turkey
  4. Eat slowly
  5. Drink more water (and less soda and alcohol)

If you or a loved one is living with GERD, what Thanksgiving tips and GERD-friendly recipes can you share? Hop in the forum and get a conversation going.

*http://www.aboutgerd.org/

 

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Food for thought: Which foods trigger headaches and migraines?

Posted June 23rd, 2016 by

Last week, we shared some study results for National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month. Today, we’re digging deeper into which foods might trigger – or help – chronic headaches. We asked the community for their diet dos and don’ts, and here’s what members have said so far…

 

“I have found too much sugar can trigger a migraine. But then at the same time, in the past when I have had a migraine, If I drank a Mountain Dew (regular) and ate salty potato chips it would help alleviate it.  I believe it was the salt and caffeine that helped.” 

— PatientsLikeMe member living with chronic kidney disease

 

“I have noticed an incredible difference dropping sugar from my diet along with dairy. Am now using Stevia and there are many alternatives to milk products.”

 —PatientsLikeMe member living with rheumatoid arthritis

 

“I have suffered migraines for more than 35 years… At one point, I was having migraines that were non-stop for three to five months at a time. One of my biggest triggers was fish. The only fish that I can eat anymore is salmon and tuna. I can eat shrimp in small amounts but absolutely nothing else.”

— PatientsLikeMe member living with fibromyalgia

 

Which foods set off your headaches or migraines? Head over to the forum and share your experiences with the community.

 

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Food for Thought: IBS Awareness Month edition

Posted April 6th, 2016 by

 

Did you know that 9% – 23% of the world’s population live with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)1, including over 5,000 members on PatientsLikeMe? For IBS Awareness Month, we’re digging deeper into how people are coping with this condition that affects so many.

We asked IBS members for some insight — which foods help and which ones hurt? Here’s what they had to say about their diet do’s and don’ts:

I’ve tried all sorts of stuff and not long ago, I was experiencing much pain so here are the general guidelines:

  • No raw food
  • No legumes (e.g. lentils, beans, etc.)
  • No FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols): that helps to sort all the types of fruit and vegetable (so basically very few fruits)
  • Be careful on milk, gluten and soy, depending on the sensibility
  • No high-sugar food that can be irritating
  • Be careful in the choice of nuts
  • No lacto-fermented products

I tend to blend a lot of my food but still make sure I chew! Well, this is kind of restrictive and it depends on the people and the periods of crisis or not. I’d love to hear from others!

–       PatientsLikeMe member

For me it’s boiled down to: Nothing raw, certain veggies cooked, no dairy. I can tolerate lacto fermented foods and certain legumes. No red meat. No shellfish. Nothing processed. I used to be the biggest salad lover. Now I love broth and bland foods.

 –       PatientsLikeMe member

More often than not, it’s down to stress. So, really I only have three categories that are always going to upset me:

  • Anything containing lactose. I sometimes *need* ice cream though and I’ll pop a Lactaid tablet. Ben & Jerry’s makes an excellent non-dairy ice cream, too.
  • Anything really greasy or fried. If there’s a lot of sugar, it’s a double-whammy. Very sweet by itself doesn’t bother me, it’s always when it’s in conjunction with greasy things. Pancakes and french toast are really terrible.
  • And lastly, there’s a certain local restaurant chain that never fails to give me fits. 

–       PatientsLikeMe member

Are you living with IBS? Which foods have you added or removed from your diet? Share your experience with the community in the forum.

 

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1http://www.aboutibs.org/site/living-with-ibs/ibs-awareness-month/


Food for Thought: A heart-healthy recipe for Heart Month

Posted February 22nd, 2016 by

 

February is Heart Month, a time to raise awareness for the leading cause of death in Americans: heart disease. Healthy eating can lower your risk for heart problems, so for this edition of Food for Thought, we’re sharing a recipe from the American Heart Association. Give this Thai chicken soup a try — it’s is both heart-smart and tasty.

     

Slow Cooker Thai Chicken Soup

  •  2 lb. boneless large chicken breasts
  • 14.4 oz. packaged onion and pepper stir-fry mix
  • 16 oz. packaged white mushrooms
  • 1/2 (13.5-ounce) can lite coconut milk
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken stock
  • 2 Tbsp. lime juice
  • 1/4 tsp. red hot chile flakes
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 10 oz. packaged frozen peas
  • 1/2 cups fresh basil or cilantro leaves
  • 4 oz. raw rice vermicelli noodles, roughly chopped or broken
  • Asian hot sauce like Sriracha, to serve, optional

Directions:

  1. Place chicken into a large slow cooker. Add stir-fry mix and mushrooms. Pour coconut milk and chicken stock over the mixture. Cover and let mixture cook on high heat for 4 hours or on low heat for 8 hours until chicken is tender.
  2. Before serving, turn the heat to high if it’s on low. Use tongs to transfer chicken to a bowl. Stir lime juice, chile flakes, salt, pepper, peas, basil, and vermicelli noodles into slow cooker, making sure the noodles are mostly submerged in the liquid. Cover with lid and cook until noodles have softened, about 20 minutes.
  3. Carefully transfer hot chicken to a cutting board and cut into bite-sized pieces. Stir back into the soup. Ladle soup into bowls and serve with hot sauce, if desired.

Do you have a heart-healthy dish you like to make? Share it with the community!

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Food for thought: healthy eating in 2016

Posted January 27th, 2016 by

A lot of people talk about smartening up their diets at the start of a new year. Over the past month, many PatientsLikeMe members have shared eating habits they’re going to keep and the new ones they’d like to start in 2016 — everything from cutting down on salt to going vegan. Take a look at what some people said below:

“I’m not changing my eating patterns. I eat anything I want, just in moderation. I shy away from processed food, limit my salt intake and eat lots of fruits and vegies. I try and snack healthy, although this is hard.”

-MS member  

“I am going to be taking a complete overall look at my diet, as I don’t look after myself anymore, and I am going to try and get back on track!”

-Fibromyalgia member

“My diet excludes all animal products. That means no dairy, no eggs, and no meat or fish. I eat a wide variety of grains, legumes, vegetables and fruit. I avoid processed sugars and use coconut sugar or agave, for example. I made these changes approximately three years ago. I am healthier because of my vegan diet.”

-Major Depressive Disorder member

“I’ve been gluten free since Sept. 2015. I have felt better. I have also added gradually, vitamins and supplements. The most important one being D3. I now am day 3 of 5000iu D3 daily. I also take Omega 3/fish oil daily. Added calcium, C Complex, magnesium, Acetyl L Carnitine, CoQ-10, and B, Glucosamine & Chondroitin. I’m better than I was, more energy, less pain, and IBS is way better. I’m saying this works for me. Consult your doctor before going this route. Looking forward to my best year in a very long time.”

-Fibromyalgia member 

“Since I found out I have MS and cut down on inflammation, I eat very little red meat and pork. Have also cut down on processed food and salt. Feeling better!”

-MS member

Do you have any goals for eating healthy in 2016? Share them with the community!

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, check out the previous editions here.

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Food for thought: August (diet) edition

Posted August 12th, 2015 by

Many mothers have told their children “you are what you eat,” but some PatientsLikeMe members have taken that idea one step further and are using their diets to try and manage the symptoms of their conditions. People have been sharing about everything from gluten-free to vegan diets – check out what some people said in the conversations below:

“I truly believe, after 50+ years of fibromyalgia symptoms ranging from pain and depression to migraines, irritable bowel, and low thyroid, that the biggest help of all is to watch my diet, get in lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit sugar and alcohol. I supplement my fruits and veg intake with a whole food based supplement. This has allowed me to reduce medication to thyroid supplementation and a very occasional sumatriptan.”
-Fibromyalgia member on her “detox” diet

“My diet is greens, beans, nuts and seeds. Favorites are kale, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, sweet potatoes, black, pinto and kidney beans, lentils, black-eyed peas, cashews, almonds, peanuts and pistachios, flax and pumpkin seeds. I also have occasional sweet potatoes, apples, oranges and watermelon. Grains are consumed about once a week and are usually Farro or Quinoa.”
-Diabetes II member on his vegan diet

“With all my meds and other things I take for depression and the DBS, I can’t say that a gluten-free diet has been particularly whiz-bang helpful. However, I think it may have slowed my symptoms or made me feel better than I should.”

“I am also trying to stay as gluten-free and sugar-free as possible. It is a daunting exercise each day, but may be worth it long-term. I believe that diet plays a huge role in all disease states. All we can do each day, realistically, is take one day at a time and note any positive changes in our PD symptoms to gauge how we are benefitting.”
-Parkinson’s members on their gluten-free diets

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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Food for Thought: July (chocolate) edition, take 2

Posted July 7th, 2015 by

Last year, July’s Food for Thought revolved around MS members sharing their experiences with chocolate. This year, we thought we’d continue the tradition – check out what a few members had to say about their relationships with the delicious sweet:

“I have been trying a dairy free diet for a couple of months due to me having a problem with milk protein which is an antigen to the lungs and acts like any other substance that can affect our breathing. I have a treat of dark chocolate now and again and have been grateful for a plentiful supply of dairy free products.”
-IPF member

“For me, I don’t deny myself a little sweet treat.  What I do deny myself is massive amounts of sweet treats. I buy a few high quality dark chocolates and allow myself one per day. Or I buy the sugar free mousse packs in the refrigerator section or the sugar free Jell-O puddings. They seem to work. I also make my own brownies and cookies using high fiber ingredients and sugar substitutes. I have been using Xylitol with good success too.”
-Diabetes member

“I will take a teaspoon or two of coconut oil (organic, extra virgin) and add to it a bit of cocoa powder and a drop or two of Stevia to sweeten.  It tastes like real chocolate. The coconut oil is firm and melts in your mouth just like real chocolate…I can hardly tell the difference.”
-Diabetes member

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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Food for thought: Diabetes awareness edition

Posted November 26th, 2014 by

It’s American Diabetes Awareness Month, and the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) theme for November is “America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes.” And in that spirit, we’re highlighting the diabetes community on PatientsLikeMe. Members have been sharing about pasta, low-carb diets and ideas for daily menus. Plus, one member graciously shared her personal recipes for some of her favorite dishes – read them in the infographics below.

What’s the diabetes community sharing about?

Usually a meal of pasta and meat sauce in moderation a couple of times a month sopped up with toasted sourdough garlic bread (1 good slice) is usually enough to satisfy one’s pasta cravings. Provided you tow the line on everything else you eat you should recover from a pasta meal within 3 hours of eating it!
-Diabetic neuropathy member

I eat no starches. That is, no bread, no chips, no rice, no pizza, no potatoes, no tortillas. I severely restrict the amount of root vegetables I eat. Occasionally, I’ll have a little bit of beans. I eat very little fruit, maybe a slice or two of tomato on a burger or an occasional strawberry.
-Diabetes type 2 member

Instead of scrambled eggs, I make tofu scramble with veggies almost every weekend. Instead of store-bought cookies, I make my own gluten-free vegan version that not a single picky eater has been able to tell the difference. Instead of regular, white, flour scones, I make vegan teff-based scones with mixed berries.
Diabetes type 1 member

 

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Food for Thought: September weather and autumn recipes

Posted September 30th, 2014 by

Around the PatientsLikeMe office in Boston, the leaves are beginning to turn red, yellow, orange and gold, and everyone is starting to bundle up as the weather gets colder. In turn, PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing their favorite fall recipes and some thoughts about how the weather impacts the conditions they live with. Here’s what some have been saying:

 

I love fall. Cooler temps, brisk breezes, my favorite earth colors and long-sleeved tops with soft vests. The more clothes I put on, the better I feel. [I made] creamed chicken and peas with garlic toast. One of my favorites I only make when the husband is off visiting family.”
-Fibromyalgia member

I love recipes from Real Simple because they tend to be very…ah…simple. This is a crock pot one (yay!) and the potatoes are totally unnecessary if you are avoiding them.
-Mood member

“I will be making sautéed Kobach squash w/ onions, broccoli and some Jasmine rice. Spices turmeric, paprika, salt and pepper. Maybe a little scrambled eggs added.”
-Fibromyalgia member

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Food for thought: August edition

Posted August 28th, 2014 by

Are you trying to lose weight in time for the fall? Or are you hoping to gain a few pounds instead? Weight fluctuation is a part of everyone’s life, and PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about their weight management in the forum, everything from the Primal Blueprint 21-day diet to alternative substitutes for pasta and carbs. Read what everyone is saying.

“Finished my first week on the diet, I lost 3 lbs and my psoriasis is not as bad, it has cleared up a little…I do miss carbs though.”
-IPF member

“I think I would very much like to increase my fiber intake in the form of soup made of tolerated vegetables. I think soup will be much more easily digested than some other ways of increasing fiber and maybe cause me less problems, I hope.”
-MS member

“I’m Italian, so that’s a major problem with Type II! I can’t go very long without a dish of pasta. Does anyone have a REAL suggestion for a substitute? Or am I going to have to tempt the fates once a month or so and have a dish of pasta? I tried spaghetti squash. It was like eating shoelaces!”
-Diabetes type II member

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Food for thought: July (chocolate) edition

Posted July 14th, 2014 by

Calling all dark chocolate lovers! Did you know there could be a benefit to eating it besides tantalizing our taste buds? A new study started to get some buzz in the MS community forum when a member posted about how it claimed those who regularly consume dark chocolate may enjoy improved walking ability. Here’s what people had to say:

“I have been having problems with dark chocolate causing bowel urgency 🙁 So have had to be very judicious about my intake.”
– MS member


“Dark chocolate generates endorphins and endorphins are hormones that regulate T-cell proliferation in the immune system. Meaning…dark chocolate may help slow MS progression.”

– MS member


“I can get away with some dark chocolate most of the time, without stimulating an unexpected bowel motion. However, sugar I definitely have a problem with…and cocoa butter? I expect it is not great for us either.”
– MS member

 

Members aren’t just talking about the study though; they’re sharing their favorite dark chocolate food recipes. Check them out. And if you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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Food for thought: June edition

Posted June 18th, 2014 by

For the past couple months, we’ve been sharing about different members’ favorite foods and recipes, and we’re keeping it going with multiple sclerosis members discussing the pros and cons of smoothies, ALS patients talking about getting sleepy after steak, and the fibromyalgia community sharing about cutting foods out of their diets.

MS forum thread: Nutrition questions anyone?

“And on the other hand, some people, (myself, for instance) have resistance to green smoothies…”

“We love green smoothies. I think they taste best if you use 1/3 green stuff, 1/3 banana, and 1/3 other fruit, like berries, peaches, etc.”

“I can understand the value of smoothies, which have all the fiber blended into the drink, but juice? Not only no, but hell no.”

ALS forum thread: Could a steak make you lethargic?

“I get really tired after chewing. Steak would knock me out!” 

“My hubby has always asked for steak dinners since his dx. He says it makes him feel more energetic.”

“Try really small bites and/or mix with mashed potatoes.”

Fibromyalgia forum thread: gluten/sugar/alcohol free

“I have cut out soda and now drink seltzer water. (I like the bubbles).”

“I had to cut out the alcohol, sugar, red meat and a gluten free diet.”

“It has not been easy. I have on numerous occasions opened that cupboard door to the chocolates but then just closed it again.”

 

 


Food for thought: May edition

Posted May 30th, 2014 by

Just last month, we shared about some of our community members’ favorite foods, and about how what they choose to eat can impact the conditions they live with every day. We heard from the fibromyalgia, type 2 diabetes and multiple sclerosis communities – and to keep the series going, we’ve got three new hot, or cold if you like a good scoop of ice cream, forum threads to share. (If you follow our blog, that hot/cold play just made you smile… again. ☺)

ALS forum thread: tips on how to gain weight while eating healthy?

“… the bottom line is that I need to put on weight. I eat organic foods when possible, no sugar and a little if any wheat.”

“I rely on high calorie fruit (but all are good) such as bananas, mangoes, blueberries, etc. I just blend them up (using one fruit) to make smoothies.” 

“You might try using Ensure, Boost or other nutritional food extras.” 

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis forum thread: Primal blueprint

“The basic premise is that we should be eating like our pre-agricultural ancestors and eliminate grains and sugars from our diet. I need to lose weight to get on the transplant list…”

“And it becomes very surprising to find out how wheat is found in many unexpected products.”

“Men do demonstrate the ability to lose weight quicker and faster than women … although I prefer the word ‘program’ to ‘diet’” 

PatientsLikeMe forum thread: Nutrition questions anyone?

“Someone mentioned to me, and I am wondering if it is a concern to others, that the skin of fruit nowadays might have too many toxins from sprays, etc. … do others that eat non-organic worry about that?” 

“Juicing is a wonderful way to gulp down the 10-20 servings of raw fruits and vegetables that many are encouraged to intake.

“My intestines are very sensitive to fibre, I would have to build up the fibre content very slowly, or they would go straight through me …”

Jump into one of these forum threads or you can always start your own with a favorite recipe, general diet tips that have worked for you or a question you think the community can help answer.


Food for thought: April edition

Posted April 15th, 2014 by

Everyone’s got a favorite dish (pizza is one of ours), and many PatientsLikeMe members share a bunch of their recipe ideas and foods in the forum. So, we’re going to start highlighting some of the hottest – or maybe the coolest, if you like gazpacho – conversations on the blog as part of a new “Food for thought” series. We’ll be featuring what people are saying in different condition communities.

So, what are people talking about this month?

Fibromyalgia forum thread: What did you make for dinner tonight?

“Leftover sage and rosemary soup, added mushrooms and scrambled egg batter. Stirred until cooked, added sea salt and pepper. Yummy!”

“Crock pot lamb shanks and salad.”

“A protein bar and yogurt – not hungry.”

Type 2 diabetes forum thread: High early morning blood glucose readings

Try having a low carb high protein snack at bedtime. This usually helps me have a lower reading in the morning. I have a really grainy piece of toast with peanut butter or cheese and it works wonders.”

“I eat my dinner at 4:30 or 5 p.m.  I also watch my carbs.  That helps me get the sugar down in the morning.

“At night for a snack and hour or so before bed I might have a piece of celery with peanut butter.

Multiple sclerosis forum thread: Different diets and reactions

“I have to say, the flavor of grass-fed beef is far superior to that of the ‘conventionally raised’ beef.”

“I have gone with the Mediterranean diet and it seems to have helped me physically. Not so much neurologically, though

Does any of that sound familiar? If you are living with fibromyalgia, diabetes type 2 or multiple sclerosis, join PatientsLikeMe and jump into a conversation in the forum, or start a new thread of your own. Sharing experiences has never tasted so good!