12 results for “"Share and compare"”

Share and Compare: What Have You Learned with InstantMe?

Posted March 9th, 2011 by

How are you feeling today – honestly?

instantme-choices

In December, PatientsLikeMe launched a new feature called InstantMe. It’s designed to allow you to chart how you are feeling day in and day out. Is today a bad day? Record it on InstantMe (found on your profile), and if you’d like, add a note explaining what’s going on.

With InstantMe, patients like you are able to learn about your day-to-day fluctuations in response to your symptoms, treatments and many other things, such as family stress or work issues. More than 13,000 of you have been using InstantMe for a little over three months.

So, what have you gleaned from it so far? Here’s a sampling of the feedback you’ve shared.

  • I really like Instant Me because I see that I am feeling better than I thought and noticed the weather really has an effect on me.
  • I’m more aware of the changes that have occurred since I had the CCSVI procedure. And using this new InstantMe has let me chart this almost on a daily basis.
  • I can record when and why I feel the way I do, like if I am trying a new supplement and such, or forgot to take my vitamins, or if my teen was home all week.
  • My neuro asked that I keep a diary of my issues and when PatientsLikeMe started InstantMe, that was a perfect format. This allowed me to track day to day changes in pain levels and V/S steroid input.
  • One thing I have noticed is that that feeling of being more run down at the end of the week is NOT my imagination. I also am curious to see what times of day are my “best” times to do mental activities.

What about you? We’d love to hear what you’ve learned from answering the question “How are you feeling?” on a regular basis.

PatientsLikeMe member emorgan


Share and Compare: The Launch of Two Medications

Posted February 10th, 2011 by

The launch of a new medication can be a very exciting event.  It can renew hope for a better future and provide proof of the billions spent on research every year.  It can also stimulate a lot of interesting conversation.

Or not.  We’ve learned from you that not every new medication warrants your attention and discussion.  What’s fascinating is learning which ones do and which ones don’t, and why.  We saw a recent example of this on PatientsLikeMe:

medsavb

(In this chart, the medications are called “A” and “B” so, as we continue to observe and research dialogue about these medications, we will not have influenced you in any way.)

This chart shows the volume of conversation about two new medications that were approved by the FDA to treat the same disease.  We studied the time immediately following FDA approval of each new medication to see whether or not patients were talking about them.  Since the drugs were approved at different points in time, we simply shifted them onto a single timeline for head-to-head comparison.

What a difference!  In the first month following FDA approval, you discussed Drug A 67 times but Drug B only 25 times.  Three months later, the difference grew to 402 discussions about Drug A to only 42 discussions about Drug B.

What caused this difference, and why is it so pronounced?  Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way:

  • There was no major event or change on PatientsLikeMe during this time.
  • The number of patients on PatientsLikeMe was approximately the same when both new medications were approved.
  • PatientsLikeMe was not influencing conversation on either new medication.
  • Neither medication was available for use before month 3, long after the two lines in the chart had separated.
  • Similarly, the companies that developed these new medications did not begin their marketing efforts before month 3.

What this leaves is the new medications themselves.  There must be something different between Drug A and Drug B – could be side effects, could be efficacy, could be something else entirely – that drove the volume of conversation about Drug A only.  PatientsLikeMe will study this in greater detail to understand and illuminate the factors behind this phenomenon.

Why?  Because researchers need to know what you value in new medications.  By listening to your unmet needs, researchers can develop solutions to unsolved problems caused by your disease.  Wouldn’t that get you talking?

This is just another example among many of how you are selflessly giving back and helping advance medicine on PatientsLikeMe.

PatientsLikeMe member cfidyk


Share and Compare: A PatientsLikeMe Year in Review (Part III – more R&D)

Posted January 5th, 2011 by

The research team is very proud of how our team has grown in 2010 and the impact we’ve made in the academic community.  In 2010 alone, PatientsLikeMe and our work were mentioned in scientific literature more than 133 times.  All of this is because of what you share with us.

Yesterday, we highlighted some of the research work we’ve done in 2010 across our four newest communities.  Today, we’ll highlight our older communities.  Below is also a highlights reel of some of this work.

HIV

  • Throughout 2010, we discussed the goal and benefits to measuring your quality of life (QoL). This concept of measuring QoL started in our HIV Community at the end of 2009. Earlier this year in a blog and podcast, Researcher Michael Massagli Ph.D. discussed some of the insights that are being shared by HIV patients through the QoL survey. For instance, we found that the average physical, mental and social well-being score of patients with a CD4 count below 200 is significantly lower than for those of you with a count above 200.

Parkinson’s Disease

  • The Parkinson’s Community has always excelled in reporting their health status through the Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (or PDRS). When answering the questions on this scale, members often asked us: “Should I respond when my drugs are working and I’m at my best (‘On’) or when my drugs aren’t working and I’m at my worst (‘Off’)?” Back in October, we released a brand new feature in the PD community that allows you to rate your symptoms as either “On,” “Off”, or in both conditions so now you can see the effect of your medications for yourself.

Multiple Sclerosis

  • We hear a lot from you about the difficulty of adhering to medication. Early last year, our research team developed a new rating scale for patients with MS to assess the difficulties of sticking to their medication. We presented findings at the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC), the main North American conference for MS specialist physicians, nurses, and researchers. The team is currently working on publishing these findings.

ALS

  • Co-founder Jamie Heywood discussed our research into lithium in ALS at the TEDMED conference late in 2009. In early 2010, TEDMED released the video of his presentation where he shares our vision of the future of medicine. The team is currently working on publishing the lithium findings.
  • PatientsLikeMe, in collaboration with researchers at Oxford University, discovered that when ALS patients get symptoms in their arms first, they’re most likely to get it in their dominant hand. This research was presented at the ALS MND Symposium and cited on this MND Research blog.
  • We also collaborated with the Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) to examine the decision-making process that patients with ALS go through when considering whether or not to take part in research studies; this was published in the peer-reviewed journal Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Here’s a short video highlighting much of the research you’ve helped us do in 2010.

Finally, I want to recognize how our team has expanded this year to better focus on what matters to you most.  Some new additions include:

  • Brant Chee, Ph.D. – a specialist in natural language processing and detecting drug safety data in patient reported text
  • Kate Slawsky, MPH – an outcomes researcher helping to develop custom surveys for our partners and our platform
  • Shivani Bhargava – a research assistant supporting the team in ensuring our platform holds high-quality data about our patients

Thank you all for having a voice in research. There’s so much being learned from what you are sharing every day, and we are excited about what 2011 will bring.

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks


Share and Compare: A PatientsLikeMe Year in Review (Part II – R&D)

Posted January 4th, 2011 by

rd1The PatientsLikeMe research and development (R&D) team is excited about what we can all share and learn in 2011.  Here’s a look back at some of what patients like you shared with us, and what we then shared with the world, in 2010.

The R&D team published and presented some unprecedented insights based on what you shared with us this year.  In addition to attending and presenting at some noteworthy conferences in 2010, we also published a series of blogs and podcasts pulled together just for you.

Based on your feedback, the R&D team also implemented some changes to the medical architecture that will help improve the research we do, as well as your experience as a patient on the site.  Ultimately, we are working to develop tools that help you answer the question: “Given my status, what is the best outcome I can hope to achieve and how do I get there?”

Today and tomorrow, we’ll be highlighting some of the work we’ve done in 2010 focused on various communities.  Today, we start with the following (listed from newest to oldest community):

Organ Transplants

  • Researcher Catherine Brownstein MPH, Ph.D. presented a poster at the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) Renal Week in Denver. We compared the profile of our Transplants Community to published data from the UNOS/OPTN databases and found that about half of our patients knew about the exact degree of tissue matching they had with their donor. We found the fewest mismatches in organs that had come from deceased, rather than living donors. We also found that within the living donors the closest matches came from siblings, followed by parents, children, and then any other relative.

Epilepsy

  • In December, the team attended the annual American Epilepsy Society (AES) conference and presented a poster comparing our data to the Pharmetrics insurance claims database. We found that our Epilepsy Community is a little more likely to be female, more likely to be in their 20s-40s, and that they are more likely to be taking multiple anti-epileptic drugs than the broader epilepsy population. Exploring the biases in our data set and being transparent about them is one of our core values as a science team.
  • PatientsLikeMe is running an ongoing patient-reported outcomes (PRO) study with UCB to measure the physical, social and mental well-being of people with epilepsy over time. By the end of 2010, members of our Epilepsy Community had completed more than 1,300 PRO surveys. Thanks to all of you who contributed.

Fibromyalgia

  • The R&D team recently blogged about a report comparing our Fibromyalgia Community to the wider fibromyalgia population and revealed we are now able to declare with confidence that our community very closely matches the fibromyalgia community at large.
  • In 2010, we published a study entitled “Sharing Health Data for Better Outcomes on PatientsLikeMe” in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR). The study, conducted across several of our communities, established a link between sharing health data and benefits experienced on our site. The fibromyalgia-specific findings were that 21% of fibromyalgia members of our site strongly agreed or agreed that they had changed physicians as a result of using PatientsLikeMe, higher than the rate in MS (15%), mood (10%), Parkinson’s (9%), HIV (8%), or ALS (6%).
  • In response to popular demand for more research in fibromyalgia, the R&D team has also started reaching out to members of the scientific community to design research studies to take place in early 2011.

Mood

  • Looking again at the JMIR study specifically within the Mood Community, we found 26% of users agreed or strongly agreed that using the site had reduced thoughts about self harm; 23% agreed they had decided to start therapy or counseling after interacting with others on the site; and 22% agreed they needed less inpatient care as a result of using PatientsLikeMe.  Here’s a video where I present some of these results, and give a walk-through of the Mood Community, at the UMASS Medical School’s Psychiatry Grand Rounds this year.
  • We also recently introduced a new tool in all of our communities called “InstantMe” to help you put your experiences in context.  Based on the feedback we received from members of our mood community about the pilot tool (called “InstantMood”), it is now available for everybody.
  • In response to popular demand for more research in mood, the R&D team has also started reaching out to members of the scientific community to design research studies to take place in early 2011.

More highlights, including a video, coming tomorrow.

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks


Share and Compare: Be a PRO! Understand Your Experiences in Context

Posted December 6th, 2010 by

This week on our blog, we’ve been highlighting how patients like you are putting their experiences in context.  With the launch of InstantMe and some of the design updates you read about, you can see we’re listening to your call for more functionality that lets you understand how your condition affects the whole you.

Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) questionnaires are a great tool to illuminate the physical, mental, and social dimensions of your overall health. In fact, PROs are increasingly used in clinical trials, and in December 2009 the FDA approved the use of PROs to support product claims. Best of all, PROs are free of clinical interpretation, which empowers you, the patient, to have your voice heard in the real world.

PatientsLikeMe is an unparalleled platform for electronic PROs, which have a few advantages over traditional pen-and-paper ones, such as:

  • Patients are more likely to share and share truthfully using electronic interfaces;
  • Researchers have real-time access to the data;
  • Electronic PROs enable alerts for specific concerns (such as adverse side effects), ensuring better safety for all patients (1).

Early on in our partnership, our colleagues at the biopharmaceutical company UCB proposed a longitudinal PRO survey: members of our Epilepsy Community would have access to surveys that reveal the effect of their condition on everyday life over distinct periods. That’s right — you could see your progress over time! Together with UCB,  we decided to take the concept of an electronic PRO one step further: not only would you be able better understand your own experience with epilepsy, but you would also be able to put it in context. When you complete a PRO survey, you’ll see that you can compare your results to the larger Epilepsy Community!

Figure 1

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Figure 2

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Such commitment to patient health reveals two interesting things about UCB: First, patients really do come first; and secondly, UCB is committed to understanding how their products work in the real world, and not just in clinical trials. It is not easy to take a leadership position in an innovative arena such as this, and we are proud to partner with such a company.

screen-shot-2010-12-03-at-95803-amAs of today, members of our Epilepsy Community have completed more than 1,300 PRO surveys. By the end of 2010, many of you will have contributed to the largest patient-led study ever in epilepsy.

Are you in on what our communities already know?  Share…and then compare. If you understand your condition in the broader context, you’ll be a PRO too.

1. Dupont et al. “Use of Tablet Personal Computers for Sensitive Patient-Reported Information.”  Journal of Supportive Oncology. Volume 7, Number 3. May/June 2009.

PatientsLikeMe member AMGraham


Share and Compare: From the mouths of patients

Posted December 3rd, 2010 by

screen-shot-2010-12-03-at-41141-pmAs we round out our “Share and Compare” week, here are a few quotes that some of our members have shared regarding the impact of being able to see where you fit in.

You’ll read in the quotes how patients like you can find solace in the fact that there are others out there experiencing the same thing;  you’ll see how your sharing is helping others make sense of their treatment dosages; and you’ll feel through these quotes how personal sharing can be within a community like ours.  Behind all the graphs and charts we’ve shared this week are people – here’s what they have to say.

Stay tuned next week for a few follow-up pieces on Share and Compare, as well as a new topic series.  Have you learned from sharing and comparing?  Add a comment below, post in the forum or connect with us through private message inside the site.

- – -

“It’s so nice to share information with others who are experiencing the same thing. The most frustrating thing I remember as a teenager was when doctors couldn’t explain exactly what was happening to me or why. I used to feel as if I did something wrong and that’s why I was ‘different’. The more information we can share with each other, the better.”
- Epilepsy community member

“I feel like a breath of fresh air of hope; just knowing I’m not alone and there are others who experience side effects, have good and bad days even experience combination seizures.”
- Epilepsy community member

“[It] really puts my mind at ease and sounds like my [treatment] dosage is not that unusual this soon after my transplant. I look forward to eventually taking it down.”
- Transplant community member

“I am so thankful [to have] found this site…where I can, after a fashion, talk and identify with others on the PD bus. We understand. We are similarly bound.”
- Parkinson’s community member

“…just being able to see so many people that are going through the same thing I am (literally sorted by [treatment] and [diagnosis]) – makes it feel just a little bit more in control for me.”
- Fibromyalgia community member

PatientsLikeMe member e_morgan


Share and Compare Your Health Experience

Posted December 2nd, 2010 by

“I want to know if what I’m going through is normal for a patient like me.” This is a sentiment we’ve heard from so many of you throughout our communities.  This week, we’re focusing our blog on some of the ways we’re trying to help you put your experiences in context.  It’s a concept we like to call “share and compare.”

From a design standpoint, we’ve been focusing on how to help you see how your status relates to other patients with the same condition.  By showing where you fit within a larger group, you can begin to see if your experiences are typical.  The more data you share, the more you can compare your experience to others.

Here are some of the changes we’ve made this year along these lines, as well as the benefits to patients like you:

  1. Treatment pages: Now you can view the most commonly prescribed treatments for your condition and see where you fit in with the treatments you’re taking.  Want to see if the dosage you’re on is in line with others?  Now, you can.  (You can also use this to discuss dosage questions with your doctor)
  2. alprazolamreport-forblog

  3. Individual treatment reports: When you view a report for an individual treatment, you can get some additional context, including how your reasons taken, side effects and dosages relate to those reported by other patients.  Again, it’s a great way to see if your side effects or dosages are typical, and then use this information in your discussions with your healthcare team.
  4. txtoplevel-forblog

  5. Condition history: When you answer questions in the condition history section of your profile, you can now see how you compare to the larger community based those items, including diagnosis status, age at diagnosis, condition type, family history and more.  Are there a lot of other newly diagnosed patients like you?  Maybe there are a lot more people with many years of experience with your condition to whom you can reach out to for support.  All of this data helps you compare your experiences with those of the larger community.

ms_condhistory-forblog

Over the next few days, we’ll continue to highlight how patients like you are putting their experiences in context and what value they’re getting from being able to compare it with others.  Sign up for an email alert of new blogs or just stay tuned right here!

PatientsLikeMe member kbrigham


Share and Compare: How are you feeling? Find out with InstantMe!

Posted December 1st, 2010 by

Here at PatientsLikeMe we strive to give you the tools and functionalities you want and need to gain insights into your conditions, including putting your experiences in context.  Today, we’re introducing a new tool in all of our communities called “InstantMe.”  screen-shot-2010-12-01-at-91856-am1Want to chart how you’re feeling day in and day out?  Now you can.

All you need to do for InstantMe is answer this simple question – How are you feeling now?  You can answer this question as many times in a day or week as you’d like. InstantMe will appear on your profile to add more context to the other experiences you share there, as well as on your Doctor Visit Sheets so you can communicate more effectively about how treatment changes have impacted the whole you.  You can even sign up for a reminder and answer InstantMe right over email.

Why InstantMe?  Many of you already use the measurement tools we have in place to put your experiences in context  - for example, there’s the mood map, quality of life scale, or clinical rating scales (e.g., ALS functional rating scale). These instruments (which you typically fill out weekly or monthly) measure the severity and impact of medical conditions on your life.  But what about all the fluctuations that all of us experience day-to-day or even throughout one day? Maybe they’re due to our health, our treatments, or perhaps something totally unrelated, like holiday planning or work.

For a couple of years, mood community members have been using a tool called “InstantMood.”  They answer one simple question (“How would you rate your mood right now?”) and then choose an answer (“Very good,” “Good,” “Neutral,” “Bad,” or “Very bad.”)  Members can even add a short note (140 characters) to each rating to remind them what was happening at that time. It’s a popular functionality and helps members put context around changes in their overall condition.  Here are some trends members can watch with InstantMood:

Instant mood trends by day of the week Instant mood trends by time of day

What we’ve seen and heard from the Mood community is that this ability to “instantly” rate how they’re feeling is useful at both the individual and community level.  As a user, you give a little something and get instant feedback.  We like that concept.  In fact, you’ll be hearing a lot more about it in the blogs to follow this week, so stay tuned.

With this in mind, we’re excited to roll out InstantMe for all of our communities (thanks in part to what we learned from Mood).  Because we know there are more things that can influence how you feel than mood alone and we believe it’s important to have measurements that get at your whole well-being, we have changed the question slightly.

It’s a simple question, but probably one of the most important ones to ask you.  So tell us – How are you feeling now?

PatientsLikeMe member pwicks


What’s Your Experience with Cinarizina?

Posted May 28th, 2011 by

Cinarizina is an international brand of the prescription drug Cinnarizine, an antiemetic (anti-nausea) agent used for symptoms of inner ear disorders.  These symptoms may include vertigo, dizziness, tinnitus, nystagmus, nausea and vomiting. Cinarizina is also used to prevent motion sickness when taken in advance.

If you’ve tried Cinarizina, we encourage you share your experiences at PatientsLikeMe, where more than 130,000 patients are using our unique data-sharing platform to review all types of treatments, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs and supplements.  Our treatment evaluations cover important data points such as dosage, effectiveness, side effects, cost and adherence so that you can easily share and compare experiences with others.

Currently, one patient reports using Cinnarizine (the generic version of Cinarizina) to treat Meniere’s disease, which is characterized by a sudden onset of dizziness, low-frequency hearing loss, tinnitus and the sensation of fullness in the affected ear.  This patient, a 55-year-old male taking 25mg daily, reports no side effects but rates the effectiveness as non-existent.

JOIN PATIENTSLIKEME TODAY

What about you?  Have you taken Cinarizina or another brand of CinnarizineJoin PatientsLikeMe and add your experiences to our growing body of knowledge.  Then, stay to exchange advice and support, research common treatments and learn from other patients like you.

Join PatientsLikeMe


One for All: A PatientsLikeMe Year in Review (Part 1)

Posted January 3rd, 2011 by

Thanks everyone for a great 2010.  As we kick off the New Year, PatientsLikeMe would like to take a quick look back at the road we’ve traveled together this year.  We think of all these improvements as laying the groundwork for even more exciting changes to come in 2011.

PatientsLikeMe Flash charts

At the start of 2010, we set out to tackle two very important goals that could help you, our members, get the best possible experience out of PatientsLikeMe:  1) unify the way we collect medical information and 2) give more information back to you so you can see how you fit in and compare your experiences with others.  Kate Brigham recently talked about some of the improvements we’ve made on the second goal in her Share and Compare post, but I’d like to share a bit more about the first goal.

Our communities have a lot in common despite their different conditions and health concerns.  As Tommy Maker said in a recent newsletter interview, “I’ve learned that we all care enormously for each other and are very eager to help those who find themselves in the same boat as we are.  But most of all I’ve learned that I am not on my own.”

“We are all in this together” is the sentiment we hear from you time and time again.  In that spirit, we made a lot of changes to unify your experiences across all our communities.  Many of these improvements started in one community where some of you tried functionality and gave us good feedback so we could improve things and share them with all patients.  With the rollout of every product development below, you can now better share and compare your experiences.

Here are some examples of ways our communities have helped each other learn and grow in 2010:

  • Flash charts: We piloted these in the ALS community last January and received a lot of great feedback.  Since that successful pilot, we converted the profile charts in all our communities to these more flexible and easier to understand charts.  This change also enabled future enhancements, like re-organizing your profile and better Doctor Visit Sheets.
  • Condition History: While many of the questions you answer on PatientsLikeMe are very specific to your medical condition, there are a lot of questions that apply to any and all patients.  When did your symptoms start?  Do you have a diagnosis?  Are you taking any treatments?  Now members across communities answer many of the same questions in the condition history so everyone can share and see how their answers compare with the rest of the community.
  • InstantMe: This idea of asking you a quick question about how you are doing started out as InstantMood, and was available only to members of the mood community.  They gave us great feedback and helped us to improve it (especially adding a “neutral” answer choice) before we rolled it out to patients in all our communities in November.  It’s now called InstantMe.
  • Quality Of Life: The quality of life survey we just made available to all members at the end of December was piloted in the HIV and Organ Transplants communities.  By having a way to measure your social, mental and physical well-being, now you can gain a better understanding of how your condition affects you – the whole you.

Thank you to all the members of our community who continue to share and learn along with us.  Watch this year in review video to see how you all have contributed to making the patient experience on PatientsLikeMe one of a kind.

PatientsLikeMe member moakes


Treat Us Right: Comparing our Community to the General Population

Posted December 14th, 2010 by

Our recent series entitled Share and Compare focused on how patients like you can better answer the question, “How do I put my experience in context?” The answer, in part, comes from how much information you share to help create that context of real-world patient experiences.  Think of it this way – with every piece of information you share, you are contributing directly to research.

When we’re conducting research, one of the things we look at is how similar or different you are to the populations at large.  We even have minimum criteria for a person’s data to be usable.  For example, if you indicate whether you’re male or female, you make it that much easier in determining how you “fit in.”  That one piece of information helps us know if our population is in fact representative of a disease, or whether we’re only getting one specific type of patient (e.g., males with fibromyalgia who don’t have much pain).  If we do get more of one type of patient, it becomes more difficult to draw any conclusions from that population and apply them to the general public.

So, you may be wondering why we need to compare to the published literature/general public?  Why can’t we just say that our conclusions apply to our users and leave it at that? The answer to this question has many parts:

  1. We have the ability to positively impact everyone with disease, not just our current members.  Ideally, we will apply knowledge gained through research in our communities to all people living with diseases.
  2. From a research perspective, we have to know our biases, and how to correct for them if possible. For example, we tend to have more women than men in our populations.  By knowing that, we can “correct” for it in our analyses by making sure our proportions are correct when we look at a sample of users.
  3. We can know how our discoveries fit in with other information known about a disease.  For example, let’s say we figure out that patients who have had fibromyalgia for 15+ years improve their quality of life by doing Treatment X.  If we don’t know how many patients have had fibromyalgia for 15 years or how many do Treatment X and don’t improve, the discovery loses some of its power from lack of context.  Perhaps it isn’t a discovery at all!  However, if we have data from our community to answer those questions and can compare it to published literature, we can trust more in our discoveries.

Here’s a great example of what can happen with the data you share.  Recently, we evaluated our fibromyalgia community characteristics with the Demographics Survey sent out early in 2010.  For some of our communities, the survey had fantastic results.  We are now able to declare with confidence that our community very closely matches the fibromyalgia community at large (Table 1).

screen-shot-2010-12-14-at-93007-am

screen-shot-2010-12-14-at-93044-am

By maintaining your profiles and keeping accurate records of side effects, medications, background information, and outcomes (such as quality of life), you are participating in groundbreaking research that is already yielding fantastic results. Our research team has presented at prestigious conferences and written dozens of abstracts and papers. Working together, PatientsLikeMe has discovered new symptoms and compared treatment efficacy; we are also working towards creating an accurate picture of how medications work in the real world so you get the right treatment for you. This is just beginning.

PatientsLikeMe member cbrownstein


The Patient Rules. A Discussion with the PatientsLikeMe Executives

Posted December 13th, 2010 by

We recently sat down with our executive team here at PatientsLikeMe in our first-ever roundtable-format podcast.  In this PatientsLikeMeOnCallTM interview, we ask Co-founders Ben and Jamie Heywood, Chief Marketing Officer David S. Williams III, and R&D Director Paul Wicks PhD to discuss why our recent series themes are so important to the history and future of PatientsLikeMe.

Blog Series Themes:

  1. “Share and Compare” – where you learned more about how and why patients like you are sharing their health information to put their experiences in context.
  2. “One for All” – including visualizations on how one member of a community can be the catalyst for a universe of unparalleled dialogue and support.

While discussing how patients can continue to drive the health care process, they also help us preview this week’s discussion called “Treat Us Right.”

Treat Us Right screen-shot-2010-12-13-at-125537-pm
In this series, we focus on how you can see if your treatment is right, just by the information shared by patients like you; and how important your shared information is to research efforts – both for academia and industry to learn how they can help each of you make good choices about your treatments.  We’ve heard you tell industry to “Treat Us Right” and we will talk more about it this week.

We kick off “Treat Us Right” week tomorrow with Research Scientist Catherine Brownstein, MPH, PhD describing why it’s critical to compare the PatientsLikeMe communities with the general population of the diseases to begin to assess the validity of treatment outcomes reported on the site.  Stay tuned.

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