Why Should I Participate in a Clinical Trial?

Posted June 8th, 2012 by

“Before me, there were hundreds and thousands of other people with Parkinson’s who participated in clinical trials that gave me the ability to have the medications that I take today. If people today do not participate in clinical trials, there will be no cure. There will be no new medications.” – Parkinson’s patient Jean

Last year, PatientsLikeMe unveiled our Clinical Trials search tool, which helps you find upcoming studies that might be right for you.  We also introduced a matching feature that notifies you on your profile when you meet the criteria for a new study.  That means when your condition, gender, age and location are all a match.

Anyone (Members or Otherwise) Can Use the Clinical Trials Search Tool at PatientsLikeMe

But if you’re unfamiliar with the clinical trial process, the idea of participating in a study may be a bit daunting.  That’s why the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently launched a new microsite called NIH Clinical Research Trials and You.  Here you’ll find a clear overview of how clinical trials work as well as a number of personal stories from both study volunteers as well as researchers.

Below are two volunteers’ stories to give you a sense of the different reasons people have for participating in research.

Jenny (Type 1 Diabetes)

Jean (Parkinson’s Disease)

Have you participated in a clinical trial?  Share your experiences in the comments section.


One Comment

  1. I had the choice to participate in a trial or receive no meds as I had lost my job and was fighting to get Social Security, but the biggest motivation was, as an ex-vegetarian and Anti-Vivisection protester, how could I not “put my money where my mouth was”.

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